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Charles Olson's Legacy for Contemporary Women Poets: Poetic Citizenry in the Early 21st Century

updated: 
Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 10:45am
Rebecca Weaver / Georgia State University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 17, 2017

In 1950, Charles Olson published “Projective Verse,” an essay that deeply influenced many poets who would form the corps of the American poetic avant-garde from the 1950s into the present day.  But his legacy for contemporary women poets is quite complicated.  When he says in that essay, “keep it moving as fast as you can, citizen,” it’s unclear whether he means women poets to be fully and equally included in that poetic citizenry.  Some women poets have included themselves as addressees of Olson’s universal male pronoun in his prose and poems by unquestionably taking up the imperatives of projective verse, even in the face of direct sexism from their male colleagues.  Others, however, approach Olson’s work much more skeptically, seeing in Olson’s discour

EBAAS 2018 Call for Papers (Joint EAAS and BAAS Conference, London)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 6, 2017 - 3:20pm
European and British Associations for American Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, October 1, 2017

EBAAS 2018 Call for Papers

The 32nd European Association for American Studies and 63rd British Association for American Studies Conference

4-7 April 2018

King’s College London, University College London and the British Library

Keynote Speakers: Bettye Collier-Thomas (Temple University), Jo Gill (University of Exeter), Pekka Hämäläinen (University of Oxford)

Trump Fiction (NeMLA; updated)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 6, 2017 - 3:20pm
49th annual NeMLA convention in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (April 12-15, 2018)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Donald Trump was a public figure long before he became President of the United States, one who became familiar to American audiences through his appearances in a wide variety of media over a period of several decades.  While much has been made of Trump’s selling of himself to the American public in branded productions that identified him as their author or producer, ranging from books such as Trump:  The Art of the Deal to his reality-TV Apprentice franchise, less attention has been paid to the treatment of Trump in works of fiction produced by authors other than Trump.  This panel will examine the treatment of Trump and his fictional analogues in films, television programs, and literature, with an emphasis on works that took up the subj

Los Angeles: Grounds for protest. Panel for the 32nd European Association for American Studies and 63rd British Association for American Studies Conference

updated: 
Wednesday, September 6, 2017 - 3:27pm
Eleri Watson, University of Oxford
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 25, 2017

Los Angeles: Grounds for protest

 

For writers and artists such as David Hockney, Christopher Isherwood, John Rechy, Paul Monette and Gore Vidal, Los Angeles provided the literary backdrop for gay communion and protest. As part of the upcoming EBAAS conference in London in April 2018 (https://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/history/eventrecords/2017-18/EBAAS-...), we are recruiting papers for a panel session exploring how and why Los Angeles has represented such a crucial stage for dissent for homosexual writers over the course of the twentieth century.

 

The World of Trump / Trump and the World

updated: 
Wednesday, September 6, 2017 - 3:21pm
Revue LISA/LISA e-journal
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

The World of Trump / Trump and the World

Pierre Guerlain (Université Paris-Nanterre) et Raphaël Ricaud (Université
Paul Valéry-Montpellier 3)

Trumpland isn’t just hell for Muslims, Hispanics, women, and other
vulnerable populations; it is hell for anyone trying to make sense of what
is going on. It is a topsy-turvy world, a world turned upside down, a
world where absurdity reigns .

Andrew Levine

The Cartographic Imagination: Art, Literature and Mapping in the United States, 1945-1980

updated: 
Wednesday, September 6, 2017 - 3:27pm
Terra Foundation for American Art, Département d'études anglophones - University of Strasbourg and the Centre for American Studies - University of Kent
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 30, 2017

The Cartographic Imagination: Art, Literature and Mapping in the United States, 1945-1980

A two-day international conference funded by the Terra Foundation for American Art, in conjunction with the Centre for American Studies at the University of Kent and the Départment d’Etudes Anglophones at the University of Strasbourg.

Dates: 18-19 May 2018

Venue: Reid Hall, 4 Rue de Chevreuse, 75006, Paris, France

Organizers: Monica Manolescu (University of Strasbourg) and Will Norman (University of Kent)

Book History and Textual Criticism at CEA 2018

updated: 
Wednesday, September 6, 2017 - 4:01pm
College English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Call for Papers,  Book History and Textual Criticism at CEA 2018

April 5-7, 2018 | St. Petersburg, Florida

Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront

333 1st St South, Saint Petersburg, Florida  33701 | Phone: (727) 894-5000

The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations on Book History and Textual Criticism for our 49th annual conference. Submit your proposal at www.cea-web.org

The Special Topics Chair for Book History and Textual Criticism welcomes proposals and panels covering the areas below:

 

• Composition, publication, and reception histories

• Bibliography

• Textual criticism

NeMLA 2018 Panel CFP - Strong Female Characters: Subversive Femininity in Literature and Popular Media

updated: 
Wednesday, September 6, 2017 - 4:09pm
Mary Ellen Iatropoulos / Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Are strong female characters necessarily subversive representations of femininity--historically and/or presently? Strong female characters often buck expectations and subvert patriarchal norms: they are super-powered, defiant, and resistant towards authority. Yet, even as the number of female-centered films increases (Wonder WomanGhostbustersMoanaRogue OneBeauty and the BeastGhost in the Shell, and Hidden Figures), the problem of unequal representation persists, and as apparent in some examples given, so does the problem of female characters adhering to cliches or damaging stereotypes.

NeMLA 2018 Roundtable CFP - Of Superpowers and Privilege: Diversity in Superhero Narratives

updated: 
Thursday, September 7, 2017 - 10:45am
Mary Ellen Iatropoulos / Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

The word “diversity” has been thrown around a lot lately in the world of superhero narratives. The last two years have featured an increased diversity in Marvel Comics’ set of characters and creative staff, with Ta-Nehisi Coates’s work on Black Panther, G. Willow Wilson’s co-creation of Ms. Marvel, the character Jane Foster being deemed worthy of Mjolnir and with it the name Thor, and Riri Williams taking over the role of Iron Man from Tony Stark. At the same time, Marvel has faced criticism for whitewashing of films such as Doctor Strange, and a refusal to increase diversity in casting with its main character taking on the white savior narrative in Iron Fist.

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