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CFP NeMLA 2017: "Queer and Now": Queerness in the Mainstream

updated: 
Wednesday, August 17, 2016 - 12:32pm
North East Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

On or about June 26, 2015, human character changed. As late as 1991, Eve Sedgwick observed that being queer at that time still meant being someone whose life did not matter and whose very survival was highly uncertain (“Queer and Now”). Yet, our contemporary “now” is a moment which has seen same sex marriage declared a federal right; openly queer persons appear as comedians, TV reporters and characters on shows, in films and recently on the musical stage. No longer “apparitional” in Terry Castle’s well-known sense, queers of the current moment might not be confined to haunting the margins of the social imaginary.

Trans Atlantic Shell Shock

updated: 
Tuesday, August 16, 2016 - 2:27pm
Trans Atlantic Shell Shock
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Although the phenomenon of World War I trauma, particularly shell shock (a term that this volume understands as denoting specifically mental trauma unique to World War I), greatly influenced both British and American literary modernism, the trauma, and its reception, was different on each side of the Atlantic, both in its scale and its quality. This proposed peer-reviewed comparative collection seeks essays on both British and American literary and cultural representations of World War I trauma, particularly shell shock. Essays that compare and contrast the American and British experiences and representations of shell shock are particularly welcome, and will be given special consideration.

 

The American Romance in 2016

updated: 
Monday, August 15, 2016 - 1:33pm
Society of Early Americanists (SEA)
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2016

his panel addresses the American romance in light of recent developments in early American studies. While many Britishists accepted the ascendancy of the anglophone novel, others challenged this teleology, and the transatlantic turn has invited us to consider whether the romance genre survived the New World. The existence of a colonial romance would challenge the “birth” of the American genre in the wake of Scott’s Ivanhoe (1819), and revising that literary history could in turn broaden American romance beyond a hoary pro-slavery ideology. Post-WWII critics arguing for an American romance tradition often cite Hawthorne’s own christening of his novels as “romances” as a key piece of evidence.

Reckonings: Essays on American Revenge Narratives (edited collection) DEADLINE EXTENDED

updated: 
Monday, August 15, 2016 - 12:06pm
Kyle Wiggins, Boston University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 6, 2016

I invite proposals for a collection of essays that examines the theme of revenge in American fiction, film, and television. Vengeance – that quest for violent reciprocity – is one of storytelling’s oldest and most enduring plots. But in the modern American imaginary the familiar shape of retribution assumes a new form. Over and over, avengers on page and screen desire not only blood but also symbolic victories. In Sherman Alexie’s Indian Killer (1996) a troubled protagonist named John Smith yearns to kill the one “white man [who] was responsible for everything that had gone wrong” for Native Americans.

Experience and Education: Pragmatism in the English Studies Classroom - Panel @ NeMLA 2017

updated: 
Monday, August 15, 2016 - 10:17am
Matthew Overstreet / University of Pittsburgh
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

This panel seeks to bring together teacher-scholars who utilize the philosophical tradition of American Pragmatism in teaching literature, writing, digital media, cultural criticism or rhetoric and composition.

This includes those who teach the work of William James, John Dewey and their progeny directly, and those who use pragmatist thought to inform broader pedagogical or theoretical projects.  Whether interested in the semiotics of C.S. Peirce, the neo-pragmatism of Richard Rorty or Stanley Fish, the “prophetic pragmatism” of Cornel West, or any other branch of the pragmatist tradition, all are welcome.

The Great Depression in Children's Literature: Celebrating the 40th Anniversary of Mildred Taylor's Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry

updated: 
Friday, August 12, 2016 - 9:18am
Cambridge/Homerton Research & Teaching Centre for Children’s Literature, Cambridge University (UK)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 23, 2016

Registration now open for a symposium at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge

Dates: Friday 23rd & Saturday 24th September 2016

Keynote speakers: Michelle Martin, University of Washington, and Gabrielle Cliff-Hodges, University of Cambridge

The Symbolic Role of Agriculture in Anglophone/American Fiction

updated: 
Friday, August 12, 2016 - 8:53am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NEMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

“Those who labour in the earth are the chosen people of God, if ever he had a chosen people…” (Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia, Query XIX). This quote from Thomas Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia (1785) represents an attitude towards agriculture and specifically the family farm that remains influential in the United States today. Connection to the land is still viewed as sacred even as less people work on the land as farmers and ranchers (two percent according to the last census) and environmentalists struggle to reclaim the “soul” of agriculture from the industrial interests that have reshaped farming and the American farmer.

Teaching War Literature Since 9-11 (Roundtable Session)

updated: 
Friday, August 12, 2016 - 8:53am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NEMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Many faculty came of age in the Post-Vietnam War era. This time period was shaped by the writings of Tim O’Brien in The Things They Carried and the films Platoon directed by Oliver Stone, Full Metal Jacket directed by Stanley Kubrick, and The Deer Hunter directed by Michael Cimino. These stories challenged the image of the United States as a land of righteous warriors protecting the world from oppression. Instead, soldiers were the pawns of forces they didn’t understand, forces that were bent on a neo-colonial domination of the world. Then came 9/11 and everything changed. Or did it?

Call for Papers: American Borderlands of Race and Ethnicity (Philosophy & Literature)

updated: 
Friday, August 12, 2016 - 8:52am
Dylan Winchock / CSU San Marcos
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

We are currently seeking finished, previously unpublished articles for an edited anthology under contract, entitled “Transgressing the Limit: Borders and Liminality in Philosophy and Literature.” This article will serve as a substitute piece for an author who has dropped out of the process.

 

The Russians Were Coming

updated: 
Friday, August 12, 2016 - 8:50am
Bulldog Review
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

The Bulldog Review invites scholarly and research papers, personal essays, interviews and creative content on the theme of the manifestation of Soviet paranoia in pop culture, the arts and American society from the mid 1950s through the 1980s for its inaugural issue. There has been a resurgence of the topic as of late with projects like The Americans and Bridge of Spies, as well as the invasion of the Crimean Peninsula and Russian Federation doping scandal at this year's Olympics.  We encourage submissions which approach the subject directly and specifically, as well as papers which interpret the theme in a broader sense.

 

[UPDATE: Deadline extended] The Female Science Fiction Western (Abstracts due August 15, 2016; collection of essays)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:48pm
Melanie A. Marotta / Kolin Ford
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 15, 2016

We are seeking original, previously unpublished essays for a collection tentatively titled The Science Fiction Western: Representation of Female Characters in the Late Twentieth and Twenty-first Century Media. In reference to historians' accounts of the frontier, Susan Armitage writes that "Women are either absent or incidental to the story". While women may have been attracted to the Frontier Myth concept, they are infrequently the main focus of American Western stories. Adult males, however, appeared prominently within literature in connection to this myth.

Bring Out Your Undead: Undead South/Undead Nation

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:46pm
Southern American Studies Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 10, 2016

This proposed session for SASA 2017 pushes and pulls beyond traditional notions of the “gothic,” horror, and hauntings, instead engaging with more expansive ideas enabled by recent theorizations of undeadness. Special attention will be given to proposals that link forms of undeadness associated in some way with the American South to formulations in or across other regions and nations. What is "undead nation," and how might we understand it in relation to undead Souths? How does undeadness migrate and circulate across regional and national frames and at the same time backlight gender, sexuality, race, settler colonialism, and more?

Acting Age in the Long Eighteenth Century

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:46pm
NEMLA 2017
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Recent work in performance studies have trenchantly analyzed constructs of identity, gender, and race in the Long Eighteenth Century. In Rival Queens, for example, Felicity Nussbaum explores how actresses of the eighteenth century embodied and challenged femininity through their roles on and off the stage, roles that blended together in the mind of a public audience. But enlightening performance studies such as Nussbaum's do not often, however, account for age. Age cuts across gender, race, and class.

Migration, Diaspora, Circulation and Translation

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:46pm
Charles Brockden Brown Society
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Migration, Diaspora, Circulation and Translation 

October 5-7, 2017

University College Dublin, Clinton Institute for American Studies

Dublin, Ireland

A conference sponsored by the Charles Brockden Brown Society

(www.brockdenbrownsociety.ucf.edu

1980s Nostalgia in 21st Century Film and Television

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:46pm
Douglas A. Cunningham / Society of Cinema and Media Studies Conference, Chicago, March 2016
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 19, 2016

This is a call for proposals on 1980s nostalgia in 21st-century film and television.  Topics may include, but are not limited to, films and programs such as TRON: LEGACY, SUPER 8, STRANGER THINGS, CREED, and THE EXPENDABLES series, among many others.  A variety of disciplinary approaches is welcome.  Please send a 300-word proposal, a 50-word bio, and a list of at least five relevant sources to Dr. Doug Cunningham at dcunningham@westminstercollege.edu.  The Society for Cinema and Media Studies Annual Conference will be held in Chicago between March 22 and March 26, 2017.

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