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The Monster In The House: Domestic Ideology in Superhero Narratives (NeMLA 2016 Panel 15842)

Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 8:11pm
Mary Ellen Iatropoulos, Independent Scholar / Derek S. McGrath, SUNY Stony Brook

Deadline for abstract submissions: September 30th 2015

In worlds full of superhuman heroes, mythological imaginary creatures and battle narratives of epic scope, what is the role of the domestic? In the recently released film _Avengers: Age of Ultron_, the titular superheroes hide away not in a high-tech secured stronghold but in a farmhouse belonging to the archer Hawkeye, his wife, and their young children. Barton's presence as the film's only parent with a seemingly stable domestic lifestyle provides a temporary shelter for our heroes, illustrating how the domestic can function as a stable ground for the superhero narrative to withstand its otherwise fantastic, explosive elements.

Animals, Animality, and National Identity (ACLA 3/17-3/20/2016; due 9/23/15)

Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 5:22pm
Keridiana Chez

This seminar will explore how national identities have been forged through the manipulation and deployment of animals and animality. How have animals, and ideas associated with such animals, been used to construct imagined communities? How have these constructions helped to strengthen or weaken national borders? How have assertions of imagined community, as expressed via relations with animals, overlapped with racial/ethnic identities?

Rethinking National Foundations: Using/Abusing History (ACLA 2016; March 17-20; Cambridge, MA)

Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 2:17pm
Meredith Malburne-Wade (Gettysburg College) / ACLA 2016

Foundational texts, events, and people influence our cultural and national personas. In the United States, for example, people may look to the Constitution and patriotic songs or even the bible as foundational texts--texts that define (and limit?) national identity. We often see events such as the Salem Witch Trials, the Civil War, and the Civil Rights Movement as critical moments of national formation, while people such as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Martin Luther King, Jr. represent quintessential "Americans.". These foundational texts, events, and people work their way into literature and pop culture in myriad ways as authors, writers, poets, filmmakers and playwrights incorporate, reify, or challenge them through their works.

THE "POETESS" IRL: The World, Work, and Performances of Nineteenth-Century Women Poets / Aug 25 Submission

Friday, August 7, 2015 - 4:53pm
Lauren Kimball and Caolan Madden (Rutgers University) for C19 Conference 2016

THE "POETESS" IRL: The World, Work, and Performances of Nineteenth-Century Women Poets

What was the nineteenth-century woman poet like in real life? This panel seeks to unsettle current definitions by attending to her performing/reforming body and the work she did in the material world.

The Afterlives of Nineteenth-Century Medicine (March 10-13, 2016)

Friday, August 7, 2015 - 12:24pm
INCS 2016 (Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies)

From sympathetic contagion to animal magnetism, nervous physiology to cell theory and germ theory, nineteenth-century medical theory and practice imagined human embodiment in open relation to the environmental, economic, religious, and political forces that shape historical experience. Often represented in both cultural and physiological terms, disease functioned as both sign and symptom of the irrevocable togetherness of mind and body, something to be combatted morally and technologically by prudence and enlightened reason.

[UPDATE] CFP: "Moved by the Spirit, Authorized by God: Black Women Activists and Religion" NEMLA Mar 17-20, 2016, Hartford. CT

Friday, August 7, 2015 - 9:34am
Jami Carlacio, Borough of Manhattan CC/CUNY

Since the era of slavery and continuing through the present, Black women have articulated a vision of freedom, equality, anti-racism, and racial uplift, drawing from Scripture to sustain their work of promoting equal rights for African Americans. From the early female abolitionists such as Maria Stewart, Sojourner Truth, and Harriet Tubman, to the anti-lynching activists Ida B. Wells and Mary Talbert, to the twentieth-century civil rights activists Ella Josephine Baker and Septima Clark, and countless others, these "churchwomen" actively challenged the status quo that relegated Black women to the least empowered positions in the social order.

Update: Gender and Class Representation in U.S. Culture, NeMLA, Hartford, 3/17-3/20

Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 3:57pm
47th Northeast Modern Language Association Convention

This panel investigates the contemporary meaning of gender and class in film and literature in the United States. While authors such as Sheryl Sandberg and Hannah Rosin focus on women in the professional ranks to argue for women's prominence in U.S. culture and stories of professional women dominate the media, few stories of working-class women have emerged to challenge the symbolic dominance of the white male worker and breadwinner. As work, families, and genders have changed, how has this symbolism been reinforced or challenged in literature and film?

The New Literary Anxiety (ACLA 2016 Seminar Proposal, March 17th-20th, Harvard University)

Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 1:44pm
Elizabeth Oldfather, University of Colorado,Colorado Springs; Rebecca Soares, Arizona State University

The melancholic poet, the neurasthenic female reader, the man of artistic temperament: these heavily typed figures, each coded in the medical and psychological discourse of its own time, together bespeak a longstanding cultural connection between anxiety and literature. Sianne Ngai, in Ugly Feelings, even tentatively identifies anxiety as "the distinctive 'feeling-tone' of intellectual inquiry itself" – a signifying trope of bookish existence. But what might this connection between literature and anxiety mean after the advent of psychopharmacology, of neurodiversity awareness, of classroom trigger warnings?

"Catch if you can your country's moment": The Poetry of Current Events, NeMLA, Mar. 17-20, 2016, Hartford. Proposals by Sept. 30

Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 1:04pm
William Waddell

If literature is, as Pound said, "news that stays news," then perhaps poetry is always a matter of current events, but recently, books like Claudia Rankine's Citizen or Brian Turner's Here, Bullet, to name just two, have taken on contemporary public moments, current events in common parlance, and in the process sparked a different kind of conversation.