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CFP: Peripheral Modernity and the South Asian Literary-World

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 5:54pm
24th European Conference on South Asian Studies, University of Warsaw, Poland

The 2008 global downturn has compelled the social sciences and humanities to refocus on the concept of "crisis" in capitalism and rethink the relations between "core" and "periphery." What is crucial to this era of crisis is the emergence of the BRICS countries and the corresponding shifts in the world system. Debates on world literature and comparitivism have been alert to these readjustments (Moretti, 2000; Orsini, 2003; Damrosch, 2005; Warwick RC, 2015) as well as the proliferation of the neo-social realist novel (Adiga, Hamid, etc).

Managing the Adviser-Graduate Student Relationship (March 16-20, 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 5:35pm
NeMLA (Northeast Modern Language Association)

How are advisers best prepared to work with graduate students? How can we prepare graduate students to be, to borrow Leonard Cassuto's language, "the CEOs of their own graduate education"? What personal, professional, and institutional shifts are required to ensure that graduate students aren't infantilized and demoralized, but instead are professionalized and empowered, and ultimately prepared for diverse careers? This roundtable invites papers from graduate students and their mentors that propose answers to these and other related questions.

Please submit an abstract of ~250-400 words with a brief CV to James M. Van Wyck (jvanwyck AT fordham.edu)

REMINDER CFP Vladimir Nabokov International Conference - Biarritz, France April 28 - May 1, 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 5:28pm
French Vladimir Nabokov Society

"Do the Senses Make Sense?": The Five Senses in Nabokov's Work

International Conference organized by the French Vladimir Nabokov Society

Biarritz, France April 28-May 1, 2016

After the 2013 Conference on "Nabokov and France" in Paris, the Enchanted Researchers – The French Vladimir Nabokov Society invites scholars to reflect upon the importance and significance of the Five Senses in Nabokov's work, poetics and aesthetics, for its next International Conference. Keynotes Speakers are Brian Boyd (University of Auckland) and Maurice Couturier (University of Nice).

"Laboring, Loafing, and Languishing": Work and Identity in Antebellum American Literature (Panel)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 4:26pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) Hartford, CT March 17-20 2016

In 1784, Benjamin Franklin writes of Americans "[we] do not inquire concerning a stranger, what is he? But, what can he do?" When the first Europeans settled the shores of what is now the United States, hard work was necessary for the very survival of the small communities, yet since then, the notion of hard work and a strong "work ethic" has passed into American consciousness as a (if not the) defining virtue of both an individual's identity and of national identity. This panel seeks papers exploring what literary work produced in "Antebellum America" (roughly 1820-1861) has to say about this idea of hard work as the primary shaper of both individual and national identity.

Conference marking the 40th Anniversary of the television miniseries Roots

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 3:53pm
Goodwin College

In the final week of January, 1977, the ABC miniseries Roots became the most-watched television program of all time. To the surprise of the show's producers, Roots became not only a ratings windfall, but a cultural phenomenon, articulating an African-American counter-narrative of American history, provoking a dialogue about the legacy of slavery, and presenting African-American characters with a dignity and integrity that differed sharply from the caricatured representations common to television up to that time. In many ways, the response to the show by the media and the general public constitutes the first of many "conversations about race" that have punctuated the Post-Civil Rights era.

Still Searching for Nella Larsen / NeMLA Hartford CT, 17-20 March 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 2:14pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

The year 2016 marks the 125th anniversary of the birth of Nella Larsen. In spite of the modest size of her œuvre and her early departure from the scene, by all accounts she ranks as one of the leading writers of the Harlem Renaissance. Well regarded during her brief literary career and for a few years thereafter, her works—like their creator—nevertheless slipped into obscurity. In 1986, Deborah McDowell's publication of a new edition of Larsen's two novels was a key element in sparking a revival of interest that took hold in the 1990s and has continued to this day.

CFP: Black Performing Arts (PCA/ACA National Conference, Seattle, March 21-25 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 1:56pm
Michael Borshuk and Jonafa Banbury

Call For Proposals: Sessions, Panels, Papers

DEADLINE: October 1, 2015

The Black Performing Arts Area provides a scholarly forum to share and disseminate research pertaining to the Black performing and visual arts. Broadly defined, the area focuses on all forms of performing and visual arts, including jazz, blues, gospel, hip hop, rhythm and blues, Caribbean music, dance, poetry, drawing, painting, sculpture, ceramics, photography, and acting, in the mainstream marketplace.

The Science of Affect in American Literature and Culture, (NeMLA, Hartford, CT March 17-20 2016, abstracts due Sept 30)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 1:42pm
Allison Siehnel (University at Buffalo) Nicole Zeftel (CUNY Graduate Center) / NeMLA

Patricia Clough has recently identified what she calls an "affective turn" in fields across the humanities and social sciences, which reimagine the place of emotion and the body within the political, economic, and social. Affect is increasingly important to nineteenth-century American studies, as critics like Michael Millner and Christopher Castiglia work to understand how feelings such as sympathy and anxiety helped shape literature and popular culture, as well as our definitions of citizenship more broadly. In addition, this affective turn is present in the sciences: Raffi Khatchadourian's recent investigative piece, "We Know How you Feel: Computers are Learning Emotion and the Business World Can't Wait" in the New Yorker (19 Jan.

Placing Bilingualism: Bilingualism in Comparative Perspective Seminar at ACLA Annual Meeting

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 11:55am
Kate Costello/ University of Oxford

Placing Bilingualism: Bilingualism in Comparative Perspective
Seminar at ACLA Annual Meeting
March 17-20, Harvard University, Cambridge MA

Submission deadline: September 23

Bilingualism is a phenomenon that unites literary creation across geographic and temporal boundaries. Yet questions about the role of bilingual competencies in literature often remain overlooked. This panel seeks to bring together scholars across disciplines in exploring the place of bilingualism in literary production and the comparative potential of bilingualism in literary criticism.

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