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Use, Abuse, Abstinence: Reading Alcohol in Literature | NEMLA 2016, March 17-20 | Submission Deadline Sept. 30, 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 10:08am
Northeast Modern Language Association

This panel calls for papers that stake a claim in the cultural significance of representing alcohol or alcohol consumption. How do these representations relate to alcoholism as a disease and the alcoholic as an identity category? Does the text evaluate alcohol abuse morally or politically? Do communities organized around alcohol consumption facilitate social movements based on class, race, sexuality, or gender?

[UPDATE] THE LAND HAS A STORY

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 10:01am
Pennsylvania College English Association

CALL for PROPOSALS

The Land Has a Story

Pennsylvania College English Association (PCEA) 2015 Conference
October 1-3, 2015
Hilton Scranton and Conference Center
100 Adams Avenue, Scranton, PA 18501

Keynote by Sarah Piccini, Assistant Director
Lackawanna Historical Society

Papers and Panels: Sports and Violence Conference

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 9:46am
Ashland Center for Nonviolence

Interdisciplinary Conference on Sports and Violence, March 19, 2016, Proposals due by October 31, 2015

Americans love sports. An estimated 35 to 50 million American youth play organized sports, the Super Bowl regularly attracts over 160 million viewers, and sports figures are among America's most recognized celebrities.

(Post?) Modernist Hitchcock --NEMLA Convention March 17-20, 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 12:40pm
Andrew Schopp/ Northeast Modern Language Association 2016 Conference

In terms of simple chronology, Alfred Hitchock's films span the Modernist era up through the beginning of the postmodern era. While Hitchcock's works have understandably been examined in terms of their connections to/reflections of Modernist culture and/or aesthetics (e.g., Spellbound's use of surrealism, his films' fascination with Modernist technological progress, the influence of Freud, etc.), his later films, especially, would seem to lend themselves to an analysis informed by postmodern theoretical approaches to film and to culture.

Postmodern Gods and Monsters: Gender, Sexuality, Power--NEMLA Convention March 17-20, 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 12:36pm
Andrew Schopp/ Northeast Modern Language Association 2016 Conference

The postmodern god figure has been a staple of postmodern art at the very least since John Barth published Lost in the Funhouse, in which the god figure, both author and father, was simultaneously characterized as asleep, malevolent, kind, and/or insane. As this figure has penetrated popular culture, s/he has become more and more linked to investigations of gender and sexuality. These "god" figures strive to control the lives of others (e.g. Amy Dunne in Gone Girl, Tyler Durden in Fight Club, Kaiser Soze in The Usual Suspects). These puppet masters often work behind the scenes, exploiting the margins of society for either personal or social gain.

Unsettling Objects: Collecting in Nineteenth-Century America

updated: 
Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 10:16am
Reed Gochberg / C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists

This proposed panel for the 2016 C19 conference seeks paper proposals on the topic of collectors and collections in nineteenth-century American culture. In keeping with the conference's theme of "Unsettling," this panel aims to explore how examining practices of collecting opens up new approaches to considering American literature in relation to institutions, print and material culture, and scientific study. How does literature engage with the efforts of individual collectors or institutions to organize texts, natural specimens, material objects, and other forms of information? How did competing taxonomies unsettle existing modes of categorizing objects?

"Remeasuring Lyrical Pain" -- Seminar CFP -- ACLA Annual Meeting, Cambridge, MA, March 17–20, 2016

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 10:30pm
Jessica Tabak / Brown University

In recent scholarship, lyric emerges as a privileged form for expressing, simulating, and circulating pain: its formal flexibility, non-narrative structure, and somatic elements allow lyric to evoke an embodied sensation whose "resistance to language," as Elaine Scarry memorably argues, "is essential to what it is." Yet these characteristics do not adhere neatly to lyric. Not all lyrics are formally free and non-narrative. Furthermore, various literary genres employ the formal invention, non-narrative digressions, and somatic elements most often identified with the lyric form.

NeMLA Roundtable: "Beyond the Monster Inside: The Ethics of Fragmentation in the Long Nineteenth-Century": Due 9/30/15

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 3:36pm
NeMLA 2016: March 17-20, 2016

Doubles and doppelgangers abound in the Victorian Gothic novel and Miltonian readings have emphasized the inner monster as a nod to the period's desire to, in Tennyson's terms, "Move upward, working out the Beast, / And let the ape and tiger die" (In Memoriam). How does the trope of doubleness figure in other nineteenth-century contexts beyond the Gothic and its subterraneous influence?

Willa Cather as Modernist, 9/30/15; 3/17-3/20/16

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 11:56am
Northeast Modern Language Assoc (NeMLA)

This panel for the NeMLA 2016 Annual Convention, to be held in Hartford, Connecticut, from March 17 to March 20, 2016, will feature papers that explore Willa Cather as a Modernist writer. Fresh readings of any of Cather's works are welcome.

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