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Theories that Shape Worlds: Teaching Literary and Cultural Theory through Science Fiction

updated: 
Monday, January 11, 2016 - 3:23pm
RMMLA (Salt Lake City, UT October 6-8, 2016)

With Ursula K. Le Guin's departure from "hard science fiction" in the 1960s, worlds began to be created that examined the social, cultural, and philosophical foundations of our own societies. These foundations, which are so interwoven into the fabric of our everyday lives that they often defy nuanced examination, were un-Earthed so that their implications and pervasiveness could be clearly displayed. This session seeks to identify methods for how science fiction can be utilized to teach undergraduate students complex literary and cultural theories and will seek to answer questions such as the following: What works can be used to exemplify Marxism, feminism, affect theory, and others?

[UPDATE] Contemporary Short Fiction of the Midwest

updated: 
Monday, January 11, 2016 - 2:49pm
Society for the Study of Midwestern Literature

We invite papers on contemporary short fiction produced in the Midwest, about the Midwest, or by Midwesterners. We seek presentations on a range of topics related to contemporary Midwestern short fiction, including individual texts or authors, literary prizes, and modes of publication such as anthologies, short story cycles, and literary magazines.

These papers will be presented at "Writing the Midwest," the 46th annual symposium of the Society for the Study of Midwestern Literature (SSML), held at Michigan State University on June 2-4, 2016. Papers will also be eligible for publication in a special issue of the journal Midwestern Miscellany.

Beat Studies Association at ALA (May 26-29 '16), proposals due by 20 January '16

updated: 
Monday, January 11, 2016 - 5:06am
Beat Studies Association

1) The Beat Studies Association invites proposals for papers on all aspects of Beat Literature and Beats Studies for the panels at the upcoming American Literature Association Annual Conference in San Francisco (May 26-29, 2016).
If you would like to be considered, please send a brief proposal (a title, abstract, and brief professional statement) to Ronna Johnson at ronna.johnson@tufts.edu and Deborah Geis at dgeis@depauw.edu. Proposals should be sent no later than January 20, 2016.

Charles Johnson Society: ALA in SF 26-29 May '16; Proposals due 20 Jan '16

updated: 
Monday, January 11, 2016 - 5:02am
Charles Johnson Society

The Charles Johnson Society invites proposals for papers on TAMING THE OX and other aspects of Charles Johnson's oeuvre for the panel at the upcoming American Literature Association Annual Conference in San Francisco (May 26-29, 2016). If you would like to be considered, please send a brief proposal (a title, 100-word abstract, and brief professional self-description) to John Whalen-Bridge at ellwbj@nus.edu.sg and Marc Connor at ConnerM@wlu.edu. Proposals should be sent no later than January 20, 2016.

[Update] Sarah Piatt Panel at ALA (San Francisco, CA May 2016) Deadline Proposal Extended to January 25, 2016

updated: 
Sunday, January 10, 2016 - 10:20am
Mary Wearn / Middle Georgia State University

This is a call for a proposed panel for the for the 27th annual American Literature Association conference.

Sarah Piatt at 180 and Palace - Burner at 15: the View from 2016

2016 will mark the 180th anniversary of Sarah Morgan Bryan Piatt's birth and the 15th anniversary of the groundbreaking publication of Paula Bernat Bennett's Palace - Burner, the first modern anthology of the poet's work. Since her mid-nineteenth-century arrival on America's literary scene, Sarah Piatt has been recognized for her "womanly" subject matter and ethos, and the "feminine" quality of her poetry has been aptly characterized by nineteenth-century British author Alice Meynell "not as a grace, but as a force."

"Monster Studies and Pedagogy" Special Topics Session at RMMLA Conference [October 2016]

updated: 
Friday, January 8, 2016 - 8:56pm
Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association Regional Conference

This special topics session slated for the 2016 RMMLA Convention will explore monsters in culture, literature, and media. Monster Studies is a growing sub-discipline within English and Cultural Studies. Some scholars have been incorporating monsters into their classrooms as a way to not only teach tenuous topics in a college classroom (e.g. sexism, racism, classism) but to engage students through a new, innovative topic.

This panel seeks proposals for presentations on Monster studies in general with a secondary focus on the use of monsters as pedagogical tools in the classroom. Proposals submitted for consideration will address either monsters at large or in some specific facet of the academic experience. Papers submitted can

Special Edition-Precarity Tales

updated: 
Friday, January 8, 2016 - 6:13pm
Lehigh Valley Vanguard

Call for Papers
Precarity Tales

Seeking poetry and prose describing the precarious circumstances of the proletariat.
Lived precarity has received much attention over the last several years, especially regarding adjunct professors. We're looking for stories from:

Barely part-timers
Freelancers
Artists
And (of course) Adjunct faculty

Experimental prose and poetry will be considered, along with traditional editorial style.

No papers in academese, please. Must be enjoyable for laypeople.

Prose should be 500-2500 words
Poems can be up to 100 lines (up to 3 poems will be considered)
Please send the finished work, not a pitch.

The Politics of Time in Nineteenth-Century U.S. Literature - ALA 2016 - May 26th-29th

updated: 
Friday, January 8, 2016 - 2:34pm
Molly Ball

Recent years have seen a great deal of work on the temporality of the nation in nineteenth-century U.S. literatures. Dana Luciano, Lloyd Pratt, Thomas Allen, and others have considered how representations of time both produce and contest the boundaries of national belonging. This panel builds on such work, uniting questions about the political dimensions of temporality with questions about literary form. The panel will explore how plotting, narrative structure, and other explicitly literary ways of representing time organize, rework, and/or unsettle ideas about national time during the long nineteenth century.

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