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Feminist Singularities

updated: 
Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 2:12pm
ACLA 2016

Feminist Singularities

Co-organizers: Jacquelyn Ardam, UCLA; Ronjaunee Chatterjee, CalArts

2015 marked the 30-year anniversary of the publication of Donna Haraway's "A Cyborg Manifesto," whose radical questioning of the divisions between human and machine, matter and meaning, and gendered and "postgendered" existence continues to animate our social reality. Recent discussions in the field of new materialism, which grapple with questions of embodiment and materiality, have opened up new avenues for theorizing femininity outside of conventional frameworks.

[UPDATE] One Hundred Years of Susan Glaspell's "Trifles" - NeMLA 2016 (Deadline, Sept. 30)

updated: 
Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 2:08pm
Northeast Modern Language Association - Hartford, CT - March 17-20, 2015

Susan Glaspell's one-act play, "Trifles," premiered in Provincetown in 1916, during an era of historic upheaval in American gender relations. That same year, Margaret Sanger opened the first birth control center in the United States and Jeanette Rankin became the first woman elected to the US House of Representatives. The Nineteenth Amendment, of course, would be passed within three years. In the intervening century, the position of women in American society has evolved dramatically – 2016 may see the election of the first woman president – and yet the depiction of gender relations portrayed in "Trifles" remains trenchantly familiar to twenty-first-century readers.

Religious Perspectives on Climate Change

updated: 
Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 11:10am
CrossCurrents/www.crosscurrents.org

The editors of CrossCurrents (www.crosscurrents.org) seeks contributions for a special issue on religious perspectives on climate change. The editors welcome scholarly, activist, experiential, and artistic approaches. We will consider: scholarship in the environmental humanities, religious studies, theology, philosophy of religion, history of religions, comparative religion, and related approaches; personal essays, testimony, witness, memoir, and manifesto; anthropological, ethnographic, and eyewitness accounts of climate activism; and artistic responses to local environments in the midst of change.

Discussing Sexuality in the Liberal Arts: To Clothe or Not to Clothe? Deadline September 30

updated: 
Friday, August 28, 2015 - 9:37pm
Dr. Earl Yarington/NeMLA

Abstract

The 47th NeMLA Convention in Hartford, Connecticut, March 17-20 2016

This panel addresses themes of sexual citizenship and sexual identity. Sex can be a form of play, of identity, of expression, of performance, and of reproduction, but not simply disordered in the traditional psychological sense of the word. Sharon Lamb, a leading researcher on sex education and a co-founder on sexualization research notes in her book Sex Education for Caring Schools that faculty in the Liberal Arts need to educate people about sexuality as well. All of us need to address sexuality in our own professions where sex appears on our own terms. Suggested themes are as follows:

Afrofuturism and Environmental Humanities

updated: 
Friday, August 28, 2015 - 5:30pm
Resilience: A Journal of Environmental Humanities

The Media Review section of Resilience: A Journal of Environmental Humanities seeks reviews of contemporary media at the intersection of Afrofuturism and environmental humanities. The discourse of Afrofuturism has been recognized as an influential postmodern aesthetic, but little work has been done to understand it as a species of environmental thought. Afrofuturism asserts an eschaton beyond white supremacy and colonization by rewriting narratives of space/time travel, the topoi of urban life, and the ethics of spectacular performance. How can these practices be understood in terms of ecological aesthetics, environmental justice, and ecotopia?

DOOM: From the Personal to the Apocalyptic (1/10/2016); (2/27/2016)

updated: 
Friday, August 28, 2015 - 1:24pm
Wilson College Humanities Conference

Wilson College Humanities Conference

DOOM: From the Personal to the Apocalyptic

Saturday, February 27, 2016
10:00am-5:00pm
Held in the Brooks Complex of Wilson College
Chambersburg, PA

sponsored by Wilson's M.A. in Humanities Program

The theme of this year's Wilson College Orr Forum is concerned with the apocalypse, both in biblical representation and thought as well as more scientific and climactic concern. This Humanities Conference wishes to extend this theme beyond these global concerns to focus on doom. Always impending, doom encapsulates fears for both humanity and the individual. Doom can be personal and communal, practical and rhetorical, quite real or simply hyperbole.

Where the World Ends (ACLA2016 3/17-3/20, Harvard University)

updated: 
Friday, August 28, 2015 - 11:48am
Elizabeth Wijaya / Cornell University

Volume 2 of Jacques Derrida's The Beast and the Sovereign begins with "I am alone," which can be taken to mean "I am alone in my world, I end with my world, and my world ends with me." Beyond the ends and limits of my world, I remember, anticipate, and imagine other worlds and the worlds of the other; beyond the end and death of my world, I am remembered, anticipated, and imagined in the world of the other. But what of the distance between these worlds? What hospitality does one world show another? How will what was me and mine alone carry on in the care of the other?

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