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Conference marking the 40th Anniversary of the television miniseries Roots

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 3:53pm
Goodwin College

In the final week of January, 1977, the ABC miniseries Roots became the most-watched television program of all time. To the surprise of the show's producers, Roots became not only a ratings windfall, but a cultural phenomenon, articulating an African-American counter-narrative of American history, provoking a dialogue about the legacy of slavery, and presenting African-American characters with a dignity and integrity that differed sharply from the caricatured representations common to television up to that time. In many ways, the response to the show by the media and the general public constitutes the first of many "conversations about race" that have punctuated the Post-Civil Rights era.

Still Searching for Nella Larsen / NeMLA Hartford CT, 17-20 March 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 2:14pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

The year 2016 marks the 125th anniversary of the birth of Nella Larsen. In spite of the modest size of her œuvre and her early departure from the scene, by all accounts she ranks as one of the leading writers of the Harlem Renaissance. Well regarded during her brief literary career and for a few years thereafter, her works—like their creator—nevertheless slipped into obscurity. In 1986, Deborah McDowell's publication of a new edition of Larsen's two novels was a key element in sparking a revival of interest that took hold in the 1990s and has continued to this day.

CFP: Black Performing Arts (PCA/ACA National Conference, Seattle, March 21-25 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 1:56pm
Michael Borshuk and Jonafa Banbury

Call For Proposals: Sessions, Panels, Papers

DEADLINE: October 1, 2015

The Black Performing Arts Area provides a scholarly forum to share and disseminate research pertaining to the Black performing and visual arts. Broadly defined, the area focuses on all forms of performing and visual arts, including jazz, blues, gospel, hip hop, rhythm and blues, Caribbean music, dance, poetry, drawing, painting, sculpture, ceramics, photography, and acting, in the mainstream marketplace.

The Science of Affect in American Literature and Culture, (NeMLA, Hartford, CT March 17-20 2016, abstracts due Sept 30)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 1:42pm
Allison Siehnel (University at Buffalo) Nicole Zeftel (CUNY Graduate Center) / NeMLA

Patricia Clough has recently identified what she calls an "affective turn" in fields across the humanities and social sciences, which reimagine the place of emotion and the body within the political, economic, and social. Affect is increasingly important to nineteenth-century American studies, as critics like Michael Millner and Christopher Castiglia work to understand how feelings such as sympathy and anxiety helped shape literature and popular culture, as well as our definitions of citizenship more broadly. In addition, this affective turn is present in the sciences: Raffi Khatchadourian's recent investigative piece, "We Know How you Feel: Computers are Learning Emotion and the Business World Can't Wait" in the New Yorker (19 Jan.

Placing Bilingualism: Bilingualism in Comparative Perspective Seminar at ACLA Annual Meeting

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 11:55am
Kate Costello/ University of Oxford

Placing Bilingualism: Bilingualism in Comparative Perspective
Seminar at ACLA Annual Meeting
March 17-20, Harvard University, Cambridge MA

Submission deadline: September 23

Bilingualism is a phenomenon that unites literary creation across geographic and temporal boundaries. Yet questions about the role of bilingual competencies in literature often remain overlooked. This panel seeks to bring together scholars across disciplines in exploring the place of bilingualism in literary production and the comparative potential of bilingualism in literary criticism.

Feminist Singularities [UPDATE]

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 11:31am
ACLA 2016: American Comparative Literature Association

Co-organizers: Jacquelyn Ardam, UCLA; Ronjaunee Chatterjee, CalArts

2015 marked the 30-year anniversary of the publication of Donna Haraway's "A Cyborg Manifesto," whose radical questioning of the divisions between human and machine, matter and meaning, and gendered and "postgendered" existence continues to animate our social reality. Recent discussions in the field of new materialism, which grapple with questions of embodiment and materiality, have opened up new avenues for theorizing femininity outside of conventional frameworks.

[UPDATE} Opening for MMLA Panel in Columbus, Ohio--Panelist Needed ASAP!

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 11:17am
MMLA 2015

I have a last minute cancellation for the MMLA panel I am chairing, scheduled for Friday, November 13 at 4:00pm in Columbus, Ohio. The panel is titled Earth's "Human Layer" and Literary Modernism, and the conference theme is Arts and Sciences. In order to get the new presenter's name on the program by the time the book goes to press next week, I need an immediate response if anyone is interested in being on this panel. If interested, please contact me directly with a potential title and brief description of a paper even loosely related to the treatment of the human and/or Earth's systems in literary modernism. Ecocritical or interdisciplinary projects that speak to the conference's theme are also welcome.

[UPDATE] Performance and/as Exception (ACLA 2016, March 17 -20, Harvard University)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 11:03am
William Burch (Rutgers University)

The state of exception, theorized by Carl Schmitt and Giorgio Agamben, describes the state's ability to grant exemptions to the normative order of its own law, and in so doing to perform itself as a unified whole. But as this political encounter with the performative suggests, theatre too has a long history of engagement with states of exception, and with a capacity to disrupt and evade normative orders. For theorists and practitioners as wide-ranging as Bertolt Brecht, Harold Pinter, Valie Export, and Peggy Phelan, this rupture is one of performance's most insistent pleasures – and a source of its most trenchant social critique.

[UPDATE] CFP: Animals, Animality, and National Identity (ACLA 3/17-3/20/2016; due 9/23/15)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 10:43am
Keridiana Chez

Submission for papers begins today through Sept. 23rd.

This seminar will explore how national identities have been forged through the manipulation and deployment of animals and animality. How have animals, and ideas associated with such animals, been used to construct imagined communities? How have these constructions helped to strengthen or weaken national borders? How have assertions of imagined community, as expressed via relations with animals, overlapped with racial/ethnic identities?

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