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C19: Unsettling Old Age

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 4:17pm
C19. March 17-20, 2016

In a letter to his friend and fellow jurist, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.—son of the original Boston Brahmin, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.—congratulated Frederick Pollock on his eightieth birthday saying, "Welcome to old age… So you are a child again in a new zone." In Geriatrics (1914), Ignatz Leo Nascher shared with Holmes the conception of old age as "a distinct period of life…a physiological entity as much so as the period of childhood." Both Holmes and Nascher utilize the comparison to childhood to suggest that by the end of the nineteenth century old age had become understood as a discrete stage of life.

CFP: American Literature Area at PCA/ACA 2016, March 21-25

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 4:11pm
Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association

Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association (PCA/ACA)
2016 National Conference
Seattle, WA
March 21-25, 2016

Call for Papers: American Literature

Deadline for submissions: October 1, 2015

The American Literature Area of the American Culture Association seeks individual papers for presentation at the 2016 National Conference of the PCA/ACA, to be held in Seattle, WA from March 21-25, 2016.

Teaching Post-Modern Native American Literature

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 3:34pm
Carrie Louise Sheffield

Call For Papers: 2016 Native American and Literature Symposium

Panel Title: Teaching "Post-Modern" Native American and First Nations Literature

Many current (and not so current) Native American/First Nations texts exhibit the complex structures of post-modern literature, but are they really post-modern? And should we teach them as such?

ASECS -- The Objects of Performance (3/31/2016 - 4/3/2016)

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 2:30pm
Ashley Bender / American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies

This panel seeks papers that consider the role of objects in the production and study of Restoration and eighteenth-century drama. How might a consideration of the physical and material conditions of performance shed light on the texts through which we so often engage with the drama? What do textual artifacts reveal about production practices or even specific performances? Please send 300-word abstracts.

[UPDATE] SCMS 2016 - Hollywood Dreams and Publicity Machines

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 12:54pm
Peter Labuza, University of Southern California

Society for Cinema and Media Studies Annual Conference
Hilton Atlanta, March 30 - April 3, 2016

The irony of the title A Star Is Born is no longer surprising, as new histories have examined the way that publicity before, during, and after the Hollywood Classical Cinema has changed and developed the reception of films, stars, and more. While studying films can tell us much about the way they figure into larger histories, studying the way studios, agencies, and other distributors have presented and sold their work to the public can reveal much about both the economic and social issues of the time.

[UPDATE] Ruth Rendell: Special Issue of Contemporary Women's Writing on Ruth Rendell/Barbara Vine

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 8:11am
Falmouth University

Ruth Rendell, who has recently died, was one of the most prolific and important female authors of the C20th/21st centuries, achieving many literary awards and honours, plus a Labour peerage. Her literary output, both as Ruth Rendell and Barbara Vine, transcended generic boundaries and conventional assumptions about character, the police procedural novel, class and gender, amongst many of her other concerns.

Museum Engagements in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Literature; NeMLA 2016; Hartford, CT; March 17-20, 2016 [UPDATE]

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 5:11pm
NeMLA 2016

The rise of the modern museum was (and remains) a global event that resonates across literary cultures. Germain Bazin termed the nineteenth century the "Museum Age" for the myriad ways the new phenomenon of the public museum redefined the social status of art. This session investigates how this development was received by nineteenth- and twentieth-century Anglophone authors writing during and immediately following the rise of the modern museum.

CFP: CCLA Congress 2016—Engaging Communities Comparatively 28-30 May, 2016

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 4:09pm
Canadian Comparative Literature Association

CFP: Congress 2016—Engaging Communities Comparatively

Knowledge and understandings of shared values are created based on our respect for difference and diversity and our engagement with the communities we live in. A focus on connections between the individual, the local and the global can provoke new ways of thinking.

Cities of the Future - NeMLA Conference 2016 - Hartford, CT

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 1:54pm
Matthew Lambert / Carnegie Mellon University

This panel seeks to explore representations of futuristic cities from all periods in American literature, film, and other cultural mediums. In particular, it seeks papers responding to one or more of the following questions: In what ways have American writers and filmmakers envisioned future urban landscapes? In what ways have these visions changed over the course of American history and why? How have urban theorists, critics, and reformers as well as particular ideologies (Christian, technocratic, socialist, libertarian, environmentalist, etc.) shaped them? In what ways do the past and present (or the erasure of the past and/or present) affect their depictions?

Edited collection on college movies, Nov. 1, 2015

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 10:18am
Randy Laist and Kip Kline

Movies about college have been a staple of American cinema since the silent era. Films like Harold Lloyd's The Freshman and Buster Keaton's College engaged popular ideas about the culture of campus life as it evolved throughout the 1920s, while also setting precedents for future cinematic representations of the college experience. Benchmark films of the genre such as The Paper Chase, Animal House, and The Social Network provide insight into the ways that college has been variously imagined as a middle class rite of passage, a landscape of hedonistic fantasy, a microcosm of societal hypocrisy, a repressive system of deindividuation, and a carnivalesque holiday from "real life," to name just a few of the most conspicuous themes.

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