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SCMS 2016 CFP: Science and Audiovisual Media

updated: 
Friday, July 10, 2015 - 6:24pm
Ila Tyagi

From Jerry Lewis's nutty chemistry professor to Heinrich Hertz's experiments with sending and receiving radio waves, audiovisual media's technoscientific basis profoundly shapes its content and form. This panel investigates how scientific research and media arts mutually influence each other. Artists find new expressive tools via scientific innovation, whereas science, as Stephen Wilson observes in Information Arts, can be "as profitably analyzed for its subtexts, its association to more general cultural forces, and its implications" (3) as art.

C19- (Re)forming the Progressive Era

updated: 
Friday, July 10, 2015 - 5:56pm
Laura Fisher and Autumn Womack- C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists

The Progressive Era (1890-1920) occupies an unsettled place in Americanist literary studies, despite the period's claims to forward-looking progress. To some extent, this uneasy relationship to the discipline-- whose professional protocols, pedagogy, and scholarship often operates by means of century-based periodization-- reflects the period's own wildly unsettled nature.

[UPDATE] Reexamining the 1960s: Media, Politics, Culture Conference (proposals due 8/1/15)

updated: 
Friday, July 10, 2015 - 5:53pm
Department of Film, Television and Digital Media, Texas Christian University

Deadline Reminder: Presentation proposals are due no later than Saturday, August 1, 2015 for the Reexamining the 1960s: Media, Politics, Culture Conference (to be held at Texas Christian University, in Fort Worth, Texas, November 6-7, 2015).

The conference organizers are seeking historically and theoretically intriguing presentations that explore any noteworthy aspect(s) of media, politics, and/or culture during the 1960s, whether in the United States or elsewhere. This gathering promises to provide an intellectually stimulating investigation into the complex phenomenon that was "The Sixties." Accordingly, participants are encouraged to interpret the conference theme quite broadly and innovatively.

CFP: New Writing - international creative / critical writing journal (Routledge) - (8/1/15)

updated: 
Friday, July 10, 2015 - 12:05pm
New Writing: the International Journal for the Practice and Theory of Creative Writing

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Call for Critical or Creative Work

"New Writing: the International Journal for the Practice and Theory" is open for submissions for Volume 12 (Issue 12.3, in 2015) and Volume 13 (13.1, 13.2, 13.3, 2016).

The journal considers critical work relating to Creative Writing practice and the critical examination of Creative Writing. Strong pedagogically focused papers are considered.

Creative work (in any genre) is also welcome.

Word length and submission guidelines at: www.newwriting.org.uk

Submissions welcome via this journal submission site.

Seeking Teaching Tools Submissions for Studies in the Novel

updated: 
Friday, July 10, 2015 - 11:59am
Claire Barber-Stetson

Studies in the Novel is seeking pedagogical content for inclusion in the "Teaching Tools" section of its website. Content should address approaches to teaching either 20th- and 21st-century novels or interdisciplinary approaches to teaching novels, in general.

Submissions may include sample course syllabi, assignments, or short reflections on a "teachable moment"—a passage, a conflict, a scene, a pattern of meaning, or a character—from a novel. See https://studiesinthenovel.org/interact/teaching-tools.html for sample submissions and the complete guidelines.

Edited Collection: "Theory Lessons: Theorizing the Classroom" Deadline: September 1, 2015

updated: 
Friday, July 10, 2015 - 11:51am
book editor: Becky McLaughlin / book publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

This collection emerges from a growing interest in the ways in which theory can illuminate not just the products and ideas of high culture but also the ins and outs of everyday life. Taking the university classroom, broadly construed, as a site of theoretical investigation, this collection asks if theory can help us to understand classroom dynamics, offer pedagogical strategies, and illuminate current pressures on higher education that find expression in the classroom. As a forum for these issues, this collection particularly welcomes psychoanalytic, Marxist, Deleuzian, and feminist approaches, recognizing not only that these approaches are often in conflict but also that collectively they enhance our understanding of the classroom.

Studies in the Novel Affiliate Website: Graphic Novels and World Literature Teaching Tools (July 27)

updated: 
Thursday, July 9, 2015 - 10:50pm
Studies in the Novel Affiliate Website: Teaching Tools

The editorial team at _Studies in the Novel_ is seeking content for its online archive of indexed teaching tools on the journal's affiliate website: https://studiesinthenovel.org/interact/teaching-tools.html

I am currently seeking pedagogical materials related to Graphic Novels and World Literature such as syllabi, assignments, textual reflections, etc.

This is a continuous project with monthly opportunities to submit.

Society for the Study of Southern Literature Conference Boston, March 10‐12, 2016 The South in the North

updated: 
Thursday, July 9, 2015 - 8:13am
Society for the Study of Southern Literature

Taking place for the first time in a non-Southern venue, SSSL's conference next year in Boston will focus on challenges to and reconfigurations of North/South binaries in regional, national, hemispheric, and transatlantic literary and cultural studies. The foundation of traditional US Southern literary studies on domestic regional difference and distinctiveness has been expanded over recent decades to encompass broader study of Southernness within national and global rubrics.

Expanding the Field: Rethinking Projective Verse and Mid-Century American Poetry

updated: 
Wednesday, July 8, 2015 - 5:21pm
The Charles Olson Society

The Charles Olson Society will sponsor a session at the annual Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900, to be held at the University of Louisville, February 18-20, 2016. We are interested in abstracts pertaining to any aspect of mid-Century American poetics, but in particular those that build on and problematize the mechanics of projective verse. While "Projective Verse" has received ample treatment in studies concerning major poets like Charles Olson and Robert Duncan, other poets built on projective verse in their own ways, fashioning distinctive styles that, while tangentially related to projective verse, also created new poetic forms.

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