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THE "POETESS" IRL: The World, Work, and Performances of Nineteenth-Century Women Poets / Aug 25 Submission

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 4:53pm
Lauren Kimball and Caolan Madden (Rutgers University) for C19 Conference 2016

THE "POETESS" IRL: The World, Work, and Performances of Nineteenth-Century Women Poets

What was the nineteenth-century woman poet like in real life? This panel seeks to unsettle current definitions by attending to her performing/reforming body and the work she did in the material world.

The Afterlives of Nineteenth-Century Medicine (March 10-13, 2016)

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 12:24pm
INCS 2016 (Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies)

From sympathetic contagion to animal magnetism, nervous physiology to cell theory and germ theory, nineteenth-century medical theory and practice imagined human embodiment in open relation to the environmental, economic, religious, and political forces that shape historical experience. Often represented in both cultural and physiological terms, disease functioned as both sign and symptom of the irrevocable togetherness of mind and body, something to be combatted morally and technologically by prudence and enlightened reason.

[UPDATE] CFP: "Moved by the Spirit, Authorized by God: Black Women Activists and Religion" NEMLA Mar 17-20, 2016, Hartford. CT

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 9:34am
Jami Carlacio, Borough of Manhattan CC/CUNY

Since the era of slavery and continuing through the present, Black women have articulated a vision of freedom, equality, anti-racism, and racial uplift, drawing from Scripture to sustain their work of promoting equal rights for African Americans. From the early female abolitionists such as Maria Stewart, Sojourner Truth, and Harriet Tubman, to the anti-lynching activists Ida B. Wells and Mary Talbert, to the twentieth-century civil rights activists Ella Josephine Baker and Septima Clark, and countless others, these "churchwomen" actively challenged the status quo that relegated Black women to the least empowered positions in the social order.

Update: Gender and Class Representation in U.S. Culture, NeMLA, Hartford, 3/17-3/20

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 3:57pm
47th Northeast Modern Language Association Convention

This panel investigates the contemporary meaning of gender and class in film and literature in the United States. While authors such as Sheryl Sandberg and Hannah Rosin focus on women in the professional ranks to argue for women's prominence in U.S. culture and stories of professional women dominate the media, few stories of working-class women have emerged to challenge the symbolic dominance of the white male worker and breadwinner. As work, families, and genders have changed, how has this symbolism been reinforced or challenged in literature and film?

The New Literary Anxiety (ACLA 2016 Seminar Proposal, March 17th-20th, Harvard University)

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 1:44pm
Elizabeth Oldfather, University of Colorado,Colorado Springs; Rebecca Soares, Arizona State University

The melancholic poet, the neurasthenic female reader, the man of artistic temperament: these heavily typed figures, each coded in the medical and psychological discourse of its own time, together bespeak a longstanding cultural connection between anxiety and literature. Sianne Ngai, in Ugly Feelings, even tentatively identifies anxiety as "the distinctive 'feeling-tone' of intellectual inquiry itself" – a signifying trope of bookish existence. But what might this connection between literature and anxiety mean after the advent of psychopharmacology, of neurodiversity awareness, of classroom trigger warnings?

"Catch if you can your country's moment": The Poetry of Current Events, NeMLA, Mar. 17-20, 2016, Hartford. Proposals by Sept. 30

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 1:04pm
William Waddell

If literature is, as Pound said, "news that stays news," then perhaps poetry is always a matter of current events, but recently, books like Claudia Rankine's Citizen or Brian Turner's Here, Bullet, to name just two, have taken on contemporary public moments, current events in common parlance, and in the process sparked a different kind of conversation.

[UPDATE] Words Unofficial: Gossip, Circulation, Mediation (Nov 19-20, 2015)

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 8:37am
University of Chicago English Graduate Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS: UPDATE

Words Unofficial: Gossip, Circulation, Mediation
University of Chicago English Graduate Conference
November 19-20, 2015

Keynote Speaker: Prof. Susan Phillips, Northwestern University
Associate Professor of English and Alumnae of Northwestern Teaching Professor

Faculty Roundtable:
-Prof. Natasha Barnes, University of Illinois at Chicago
Associate Professor of African American Studies and English

-Prof. Peter Coviello, University of Illinois at Chicago
Professor of English

-Prof. Patrick Jagoda, University of Chicago
Assistant Professor of English

-Prof. Lynn Spigel, Northwestern University
Frances Willard Professor of Screen Cultures

UPDATE

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 6:32am
Bettina Hofmann/University of Wuppertal

CfP: Translated Memories: Transgenerational Perspectives in Literature on the Holocaust

We are looking for abstracts for a follow-up publication to the colloquium "Translated Memories" that took place at the Steinheim Institute in Essen, Germany, on July 14, 2015, which addressed the subject of writing about the Holocaust today: How can memories of the Holocaust be constituted and transformed in a transgenerational and transnational perspective?

The concept of translation is of pivotal interest in this context. When talking about "translation," we literally mean code switching. However, the term "translation" is also appropriate if one wants to describe psychological mechanisms and cultural processes.

The River: Flows of Innovation and Exchange in the Global(i)zed English World

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 4:49am
Department of English & Modern Languages, North South University

We would like to solicit abstracts, with a maximum of 300 words, for papers addressing any aspect of our theme of innovation and exchange. The deadline for submissions is October 15, 2015. Please send your abstracts to conference.deml@northsouth.edu. All accepted papers will be published in the conference proceedings. Selected papers will be published in our peer reviewed journal Panini. We will notify candidates of the status of their submission by November 30, 2015.

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