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DOOM: From the Personal to the Apocalyptic (1/10/2016); (2/27/2016)

updated: 
Friday, August 28, 2015 - 1:24pm
Wilson College Humanities Conference

Wilson College Humanities Conference

DOOM: From the Personal to the Apocalyptic

Saturday, February 27, 2016
10:00am-5:00pm
Held in the Brooks Complex of Wilson College
Chambersburg, PA

sponsored by Wilson's M.A. in Humanities Program

The theme of this year's Wilson College Orr Forum is concerned with the apocalypse, both in biblical representation and thought as well as more scientific and climactic concern. This Humanities Conference wishes to extend this theme beyond these global concerns to focus on doom. Always impending, doom encapsulates fears for both humanity and the individual. Doom can be personal and communal, practical and rhetorical, quite real or simply hyperbole.

Where the World Ends (ACLA2016 3/17-3/20, Harvard University)

updated: 
Friday, August 28, 2015 - 11:48am
Elizabeth Wijaya / Cornell University

Volume 2 of Jacques Derrida's The Beast and the Sovereign begins with "I am alone," which can be taken to mean "I am alone in my world, I end with my world, and my world ends with me." Beyond the ends and limits of my world, I remember, anticipate, and imagine other worlds and the worlds of the other; beyond the end and death of my world, I am remembered, anticipated, and imagined in the world of the other. But what of the distance between these worlds? What hospitality does one world show another? How will what was me and mine alone carry on in the care of the other?

SF Storyworlds [UPDATE]

updated: 
Friday, August 28, 2015 - 11:14am
Gylphi Press

SF Storyworlds is an interdisciplinary series devoted to the study of science fiction. We take as our starting-point that the genre boundaries surrounding sf have not only evaporated but that, in so doing, sf has also become entangled with the world as it is lived and experienced. Sf is not only good to think with, but it also shapes and informs many of the ways in which we think about the world.

[UPDATE] The Cultural Landscape of Teenagers

updated: 
Friday, August 28, 2015 - 7:44am
University of Maine (Le Mans, France) and University of Akron

The Cultural Landscape of Teenagers

An international and multidisciplinary conference co-organized by Elisabeth Lamothe, Delphine Letort (University of Maine-Le Mans in France, 3L.AM), and Heather Braun (University of Akron, Ohio) with the support of the regional program EnJeu(x).

Université du Mans, June 23rd and 24th, 2016
[Please note that the dates have been changed)

CEA 2016 Book History CFP

updated: 
Thursday, August 27, 2015 - 11:40pm
College English Association Book History CFP

The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations for our 47th annual conference. The conference will be held in Denver, CO from March 31 to April 2, 2016.

The 2016 theme is "Creation" and CEA invites papers and panels that explore the literary, the rhetorical, the pedagogical and the professional "creations" of our fields. What do we create, hope our students will create, see or reconstruct in the creations of others?

The special panel chair for Book History welcomes proposals for papers and panels addressing the following topics:

[UPDATE] Call for Chapters: Representations of Poverty in US Pop Culture (Extended deadline: 9/7/2015)

updated: 
Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 7:53pm
Wylie Lenz

Chapter proposals are invited for an edited collection tentatively titled Representing the Other Half: Essays on Poverty in American Popular Culture (under contract with McFarland). The volume will seek to interrogate the ways in which poverty has been depicted (and/or ignored) across a variety of media, including but not limited to fiction, non-fiction, poetry, film, photography, painting, music, radio, etc.

Questions to be considered, among others: When, why, and how do producers of popular culture represent and/or ignore poverty? How do those representations influence the idea of poverty in the American cultural imaginary? In turn, how does that imaginary interact with policy? What role might the scholar/critic play in this process?

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