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Old age and aging in British theatre and drama - An edited collection

updated: 
Tuesday, August 4, 2015 - 10:43am
dr Katarzyna Bronk

In contrast to the ongoing childhood studies, humanistic gerontology is still largely an unexplored research area, despite more and more attention being paid to old age by historians, sociologists and literary scholars. The latter have taken up the subject of aging and the elderly, trying to create something like an all-encompassing literary "meta-narrative old age" (Johnson and Thane, eds., Old age from antiquity to post-modernity, 17). Johnson and Thane suggest that this may be a fallacy and that one should rather focus on more contained historical and socio-cultural research areas when studying the processes and meaning of aging. This way, for instance, one can avoid interpretative mistakes attributed to Georges Minois.

Edited Collection call for chapters; 'Spaces of Surveillance: States and Selves'

updated: 
Tuesday, August 4, 2015 - 10:12am
Dr. Susan Flynn, University of the Arts London Dr. Antonia Mackay, Oxford Brookes University & Goldsmiths, University of London

Edited Collection: Spaces of Surveillance: States and Selves

Editors
Dr. Susan Flynn, University of the Arts London
Dr. Antonia Mackay, Oxford Brookes University & Goldsmiths, University of London

Call for Chapters
Proposals submission deadline: 1st November 2015
Notification of acceptance: 1st December 2015
Full chapters due: 1st April 2016
Planned submission: June 2016

[UPDATE] Privacy and Freedom in the Digital Age (Journal Special Issue August 30, 2015)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 4, 2015 - 9:44am
PROTEUS--A Journal of Ideas

Proteus: A Journal of Ideas seeks submissions for our upcoming issue, "Privacy and Freedom in the Digital Age." We are soliciting articles and creative works from a wide range of disciplines that reflect upon the issue's theme. We are looking for broad theoretical inquiries, individual case studies, and traditional scholarly articles related to the theme. Additionally, we strongly encourage submissions of theme-related photographs, poetry, and creative writing. Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:

Novel Theory Across the Disciplines, Graduate Student Symposium, December 8, 2015

updated: 
Monday, August 3, 2015 - 10:53pm
Mahindra Humanities Center, Harvard University

From its earliest forms to its contemporary iterations, the novel remains a radically capacious and evolving genre. As the dominant form of modern literature, the novel assumes various overlapping functions as an aesthetic object, cultural artifact, historical text, and conceptual resource. At the same time, novelistic conventions such as plot structure, narrative technique, and characterization shape and inform scholarly research across an array of disciplines including anthropology, film and television studies, law, and medicine.

Call for Book Chapters. Mater Dolorosa: The Representation of the Blessed Mary in Literature and Art

updated: 
Monday, August 3, 2015 - 6:52pm
Universitas Press

In today's complex world religious discourse is especially crucial, considering that secularism is expanding around the globe. We seek contributions on the representation of the Virgin Mary in World Literature and Art. Comparative approaches are always welcome. Religious and cultural literacy is important for domestic and international politics, the practice of peace, harmony, justice, and social prosperity. Thus, this edited volume will help diminish religious illiteracy. Universitas Press has agreed to publish this edited volume. Contributions are welcome from scholars in various disciplines in the humanities.

NeMLA 2016: Writing and Criticism of Urban Literature and Urban Spaces after Jane Jacobs (abstract deadline: Sept. 30

updated: 
Monday, August 3, 2015 - 6:05pm
Nathaniel Hodes (Brandeis University) and Daniela Kukrechtova (Emerson College)

This panel session invites papers that update the critical conversation surrounding city writing through more self-conscious attention to Jane Jacobs or her urban studies legacy. Since The Death and Life of Great American Cities, Jacobs has become known as one of the preeminent theorists of city planning and urban economics. Her concepts of organic city development, communal diversity, anti-utopianism, sidewalk ebb and flow, and self-regulating neighborhoods have entered the bloodstream of her intellectual descendants as well as her committed readers who care about cities and have been assimilated into contemporary American culture.

[UPDATE] The comics of Julie Doucet and Gabrielle Bell (essay collection) Aug. 15, Proposals Due

updated: 
Monday, August 3, 2015 - 3:25pm
Tahneer Oksman and Seamus O'Malley

This proposed volume for the University Press of Mississippi's book series, Critical Approaches to Comics Artists, will examine the works of two influential cartoonists: Julie Doucet and Gabrielle Bell. These artists have helped shape the world of contemporary comics, particularly through their experiments in autobiography, travelogue, fantasy, and diary.

Call for Abstracts: "Departments as Villages: Re-imagining Grad. Student Relationships," NeMLA, Hartford, CT, March 17-20, 2016

updated: 
Monday, August 3, 2015 - 3:21pm
Sarah Heidebrink-Bruno/ Lehigh University/ NeMLA 2016

Many people are familiar with the expression, "It takes a village to raise a child,"—but perhaps, the same is true of graduate students. As graduate programs and the academic job market become increasingly competitive, many graduate students receive the implicit message that their fellow students are solely their competitors, both within a program and afterwards, rather than colleagues. This kind of tension can lead to students feeling disconnected from and unsupported by the very people who are sharing a similar struggle.

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