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CHLA 2016: Prizing Children's and Young Adult Literature

updated: 
Monday, September 14, 2015 - 6:37pm
Mary Catherine Miller (Ohio State University)

Abstracts are currently being accepted for a proposed panel titled "Prizing Children's and Young Adult Literature" for the 2016 CHLA Conference in Columbus, Ohio. Abstracts are encouraged, but not required, to conform to the theme of the conference ("Animation"). Topics may include:

- award-winning graphic novels for young readers
- international prizing of children's literature
- award-winning electronic books and digital storytelling
- prize-winning children's or YA authors

Please submit abstracts of 300-350 words to prizingchildrenslit@gmail.com by October 1, 2015.

Bodies at Work: Reimagining the Lines of (Re)Production

updated: 
Monday, September 14, 2015 - 2:49pm
UTA English Graduate Conference

Bodies at Work: Reimagining the Lines of (Re)Production
April 7-8, 2016, The University of Texas at Arlington
Submission Deadline: December 31, 2015
Conference Chairs: Stephanie Peebles Tavera, Robert LaRue

The University of Texas at Arlington invites 200-250 proposals for individual paper presentations as well as proposals for complete panels for our fourth annual English Graduate Conference. Please include your name, institutional affiliation, and contact email in your proposal. For complete panels, please include an abstract for the entire panel, along with brief explanations of the intended presentations.

Women, Girls, and Young Adult Literature

updated: 
Monday, September 14, 2015 - 12:53pm
Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature

CALL FOR MANUSCRIPTS

Women, Girls, and Young Adult Literature
Special Issue of Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature

NEMLA 2016 CfP: New Directions in Queer Nineteenth-Century American Studies

updated: 
Monday, September 14, 2015 - 12:27pm
Timothy Griffiths / The Graduate Center, CUNY

In his 2003 collection of essays Deep Gossip, Henry Abelove suggests that queer studies and American studies, at a fundamental level, have always grappled with the same questions and concepts: an interest in the history of democratic culture, an avowal of homosexual desire, an interdisciplinary approach to literature, and the use of literature as a political resource. The eminent foci of nineteenth-century American studies have quite often been the various brands of white, male alienation epitomized by the homosocial and homoerotic literary cultures of Melville, Hawthorne, Whitman, Thoreau, and other exemplary "proto-queer" figures.

Canadian Writers' Summit/CCWWP Toronto, June 15-19, 2016/ deadline Nov 2/15

updated: 
Monday, September 14, 2015 - 11:32am
Canadian Creative Writers and Writing Programs

See our Call for Papers/Panels online http://www.ccwwp.ca/conference/2016/cfp

Canadian Creative Writers and Writing Programs (CCWWP) seeks proposals for panel discussions, forums, readings, presentations, and papers, about:

the art of writing
the pedagogy of teaching writing
the business of writing and publishing
educational and community programs for writers
elements of craft and criticism

William Gilmore Simms Society Biennial Conference [Simms and the City], September 22-24, 2016

updated: 
Monday, September 14, 2015 - 10:52am
William Gilmore Simms Society

The William Gilmore Simms Society invites all interested scholars to a conference exploring the future of Simms studies and the literature and intellectual history of the nineteenth-century American South. The conference will be held September 22-24, 2016 on the campus of Clayton State College in Atlanta, GA.

[UPDATE] Special Issue: Christianity in Contemporary Native America

updated: 
Monday, September 14, 2015 - 9:50am
Editors: Kimberly G. Weser (University of Oklahoma) and Rachel R. Luckenbill (Duquesne University)

Contemporary perspectives on Christianity's role in American Indian communities are diverse and often ambiguous, partly due to this religion's involvement in colonization. While some grassroots traditionalists and many in the activist and academic communities frequently reject Christianity for its role in dismantling American Indian traditions and identities, the past is complex, and the American Indian Christian community is strong and growing. The last two decades have seen its resurgence. Recent works such as Mona Susan Power's Sacred Wilderness Sterlin Harjo's This May Be the Last Time, and The Cherokee Hymnbook: New Edition for Everyone reflect ongoing practices of Christianity in Indian Country today.

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