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Poems Invited for Dec. 2015 Issue of Taj Mahal Review 27th Issue

updated: 
Thursday, September 3, 2015 - 12:10am
Cyberwit.net

Cyberwit seeks to publish the best in Poetry from novoices to established poets. Our published Anthologies and Journal Taj Mahal Review have poems that are sensuous, picturesque and impassioned. The poems reveal a fine combination of human elements of romance and the mystic & everyday realities. Cyberwit has published a myriad of new poets, and an increasingly large number of collections of verse. The significance of Poetry has not declined, and the 21st century seems to be the Golden Era of English Poetry. The name of Cyberwit is known to readers in several countries.

Taj Mahal Review is published in June and December annually.

Literary (De)Formations

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 4:16pm
ACLA 2016: American Comparative Literature Association

In her recent study, The Forms of the Affects (2014), Eugenie Brinkema announces, "We may well be at the beginning of what will eventually be called the twenty-first century 'return to form' in the humanities" (39). Brinkema marks MLQ's special issue, "Reading for Form" (2000), which was later published as a collection of essays under the same name (2006), both edited by Susan J. Wolfson and Marshall Brown, as the beginning of this return to form. Meredith Martin's The Rise and Fall of Meter: Poetry and English National Culture, 1860-1930 (2012) and Derek Attridge's Moving Words: Forms of English Poetry (2013), to name only two of the many recent publications that address form, seem to support Brinkema's claim.

Wilde on the Borders: Conference, Theatre, and Art, April 2, 2016

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 3:27pm
English Department, Niagara University, NY

On February 8, 1882, after his seventh lecture in America in just over a week, Oscar Wilde traveled north from Buffalo, NY crossing the border by train to Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada to play the role of tourist. In typical Wilde fashion, his response to seeing the falls was paradoxical, proclaiming it "one of the earliest, if not the keenest, disappointments" of a bride's married life, yet appreciating its aesthetic and spiritual power as "a sort of embodiment of pantheism." Wilde's visit to Niagara Falls is both microcosm and metaphor for all of what might be called Wilde's 'border crossings'—national, classed, sexual, religious, and aesthetic.

The (Native) American University

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 10:16am
NeMLA 2016 (March 17 - 20, 2016)

The colonial appropriation of indigenous place names has been an abiding concern of postcolonial studies. The severing of names from their semantic, grammatical, and linguistic ties within the native language and their re-contextualization within the language of the settler creates, in a variety of ways for both colonizer and colonized, a gap between the experience and meaning of a place and the name used to describe it, complicating the colonial boundary.

Dollars and Desire: Capitalism, Oppression, and the Racial Other

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 8:46pm
Northeast MLA (NeMLA)

The history of the commodification of Black bodies within a global context has been central to the Afro-diasporic experience. While in conversation with the Transatlantic Slave Trade and colonization; contemporary scholarship grapples with what it is to interrogate the consumption of Black bodies. Working from the perspective of Blackness and commodification in Black Looks: Race and Representation, bell hooks argues that the "contemporary commodification of Black culture by whites in no way challenges white supremacy when it takes the form of making Blackness the 'spice' that can liven up the dull dish that is mainstream white culture" (14).

Digital America Issue no. 6 | Now Accepting Submissions

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 8:31pm
Digital America: an online journal on digital culture and American life

Digital America is now accepting submissions for Issue No. 6. We are looking for critical essays, film, artwork, design, reviews, and process pieces that question, analyze, and/or hack the tools of digital culture. We are also interested in work that explores how new behaviors and new, global networks of power and influence are shaping American life. All submissions should engage American life and digital culture and/or digitization in some way. We encourage creative responses to these parameters as we understand the complexities of engaging "America" in a global, networked world.

[UPDATE] UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference: Mad Love

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 6:59pm
UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Students

UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference
Mad Love
February 19-20, 2016

Keynote Speaker: Lynn Enterline (Vanderbilt University)
Plenary Speakers: Julian Gutierrez-Albilla (USC); Jeffrey Sacks (UC Riverside)

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.

CFP: Peripheral Modernity and the South Asian Literary-World

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 5:54pm
24th European Conference on South Asian Studies, University of Warsaw, Poland

The 2008 global downturn has compelled the social sciences and humanities to refocus on the concept of "crisis" in capitalism and rethink the relations between "core" and "periphery." What is crucial to this era of crisis is the emergence of the BRICS countries and the corresponding shifts in the world system. Debates on world literature and comparitivism have been alert to these readjustments (Moretti, 2000; Orsini, 2003; Damrosch, 2005; Warwick RC, 2015) as well as the proliferation of the neo-social realist novel (Adiga, Hamid, etc).

Managing the Adviser-Graduate Student Relationship (March 16-20, 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 5:35pm
NeMLA (Northeast Modern Language Association)

How are advisers best prepared to work with graduate students? How can we prepare graduate students to be, to borrow Leonard Cassuto's language, "the CEOs of their own graduate education"? What personal, professional, and institutional shifts are required to ensure that graduate students aren't infantilized and demoralized, but instead are professionalized and empowered, and ultimately prepared for diverse careers? This roundtable invites papers from graduate students and their mentors that propose answers to these and other related questions.

Please submit an abstract of ~250-400 words with a brief CV to James M. Van Wyck (jvanwyck AT fordham.edu)

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