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[UPDATE/CORRECTED] Final Call for Science Fiction, Fantasy, Horror, Legend Area (6/15/15; New London, NH 10/30-31/15)

updated: 
Sunday, June 7, 2015 - 8:04pm
Michael Torregrossa / Science Fiction, Fantasy, Horror, and Legend Area Chair

FINAL CALL FOR PAPERS
EIGHTH-ANNIVERSARY SESSIONS OF THE
SCIENCE FICTION, Fantasy, HORROR, AND LEGEND AREA
Online at NEPCA Fantastic: http://nepcafantastic.blogspot.com

2015 Conference of The Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association (NEPCA)
Colby-Sawyer College in New London, New Hampshire
Friday 30 October and Saturday 31 October 2015
Proposals by 15 June 2015

The Hermeneutics of Hell: Devilish Visions and Visions of the Devil in World Literature

updated: 
Friday, June 5, 2015 - 12:42pm
Dan Russ and Gregor Thuswaldner

Call for Submissions: The Hermeneutics of Hell: Devilish Visions and Visions of the Devil in World Literature

"There are two equal and opposite errors into which our race can fall about the devils. One is to disbelieve in their existence. The other is to believe, and to feel an excessive and unhealthy interest in them. They themselves are equally pleased by both errors, and hail a materialist or magician with the same delight." C. S. Lewis. The Screwtape Letters

UPDATE - "Out of the Past and Into the Night: The Noir Vision in American Culture" - Submission deadline Nov. 15, 2015

updated: 
Friday, June 5, 2015 - 12:25pm
Humanities Education and Research Association

When American movies made their way across the Atlantic after World War II, the French film critics couldn't help but notice their dark and brooding quality, dubbing them noir. Classic noir texts by authors like Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler featured characters that take on the big dark city as alienated, angst-ridden antiheroes.

BLACK WOMEN'S COLLECTIVE: POETRY

updated: 
Friday, June 5, 2015 - 9:01am
Ellesia A. Blaque, PhD / Banned Books LLC

THE BLACK WOMEN'S COLLECTIVE is a series of five monographs, each having a specific literary form. The first in this series is POETRY. Each poet can submit up to THREE poems for review; however, even if all are considered acceptable, only TWO of those accepted poems will be featured in the text. The DEADLINE for submission is November 1, 2015 with a publication date of June 2016.

For the POETRY MONOGRAPH, the single subject matter is REPRESENTATIONS OF BLACK WOMEN IN MODERN MASS MEDIA OF ANY TYPE AND HOW THOSE DEPICTIONS AFFECT THE AVERAGE BLACK WOMEN IN THEIR DAILY LIVES, PARTICULARLY HOW IT FEELS TO BE A BLACK WOMAN IN SUCH A SOCIO-POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT.

AMSN3: Modernist Work

updated: 
Thursday, June 4, 2015 - 10:19pm
Australasian Modernist Studies Network (AMSN)

AMSN3: Modernist Work

The Third Biennial Conference of the Australasian Modernist Studies Network

Date: 29-31 March 2016
Venue: University of New South Wales, Sydney

Abstracts due: 1 October 2015
Notification of acceptance: 1 November 2015

Adaptation, Awards Culture, and the Value of Prestige

updated: 
Thursday, June 4, 2015 - 3:45am
EDITED COLLECTION

Adaptation studies has recently grown into a vibrant, wide-ranging field of study. Scholars in literary, media, and cultural studies have used the concepts of adaptation and intertextuality to explore how content negotiates the transition from text to image, image to text, and across media platforms and/or cultures of production and reception.

WLA Proposal: Critical and Creative Approaches to Voyaging "Sans Trace" (Submission Deadline June 13, 2015)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 3, 2015 - 10:11pm
Raul B. Moreno, University of South Dakota, for Western Literature Association, Reno, NV, Oct. 14-17, 2015

Ahead of this fall's 50th anniversary conference of the Western Literature Association, which coincides with the release of a feature-length documentary, Oregon filmmaker Ian McCluskey's Les Voyageurs Sans Trace (Mountainfilm, 2015), this panel's organizer seeks proposals for both critical and creative works that engage the story of the so-called French Trio of 1938. Alternatively, this panel may engage similar narratives of North American river-running, early outdoor recreation in the West, or other formative adventures marked by the elusive "traces" of bygone journeys—especially those fueled by "free-spirited risk-taking." For context, the following is adapted from the filmmaker's synopsis:

Fictional Economies: Inequality and the Novel, Essay collection with forward by Rami Shamir, author of TRAIN TO POKIPSE

updated: 
Wednesday, June 3, 2015 - 2:59pm
Joseph Donica/Bronx Community College

Joseph Donica is an Assistant Professor of English at Bronx Community College.

Rami Shamir is the author of TRAIN TO POKIPSE (Grove Press 2011, http://traintopokipse.com/)

Abstracts of 300 words and full CVs due September 1, 2015 to
fictionaleconomies@gmail.com
Full articles due Decemeber 1, 2015
Projected publication May 2016

{UPDATE] [DEADLINE EXTENDED: July 1] Radical Kinship

updated: 
Wednesday, June 3, 2015 - 12:53pm
Tufts Graduate Humanities Conference

Keynote: Omise'eke Tinsley, University of Texas at Austin
Conference Date: October 16, 2015

Kinships that cross boundaries often entail radical decenterings of family, community, or subjectivity. What happens
when Yellow Peril supports Black Power in Ferguson? When Maggie Simpson holds up a Je Suis Charlie sign?
When, in a single frame, Kordale and Kaleb dismantle stale notions of Black masculinity, queerness, and
fatherhood?
Can we undomesticate kinship?

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