Subscribe to RSS - american

american

Panopticon: Surveillance, Suspicion, Fear (4/2/2016). Abstracts: 12/1/2015

updated: 
Thursday, September 24, 2015 - 10:56am
Abbes Maazaoui, College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, Lincoln University in Pennsylvania

The College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (Lincoln University, Pennsylvania) is requesting proposals/abstracts for its fourth international conference, to be held on Saturday, April 2, 2016. The conference theme is "Panopticon: Surveillance, Suspicion, Fear."

Abstract deadline: December 1, 2015.

North American Literature and the Environment. Deadline Oct. 30, 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 2:53pm
Jim Daems

I am putting together a proposal for a collection of essays for the North American Literature and the Environment, 1600-1900 series for Ashgate. The book will focus on the 16th and 17th centuries, and particularly on how religious views of the period, be they Puritan or Church of England, for example, play a role in how the environment or the colonial enterprise is represented in the work(s) of an author or authors. I am also thinking of such representation in a way that can consider broader categories beyond just theology—gender, sexuality, race, ecocriticism, etc. Topics could include, but are not limited to:
How does a particular religious worldview influence a writer's representation of the North American environment?

[REMINDER] Immigrant Narratives and U.S. Racial Identities, NeMLA 2016. DEADLINE SEPT. 30, 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 1:14pm
Hardeep Sidhu / University of Rochester

America's unique—and largely implicit—system of racial identification is one of many complex institutions that newly arrived immigrants must navigate. Recent literature about immigration (e.g., Adichie, Americanah [2013], Sharma, Family Life [2014]) highlights this steep learning curve alongside more overt challenges like language and customs. Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words about narratives from any period in which immigrants negotiate racial categories in the United States.

This panel will be part of the 47th annual Northeast Modern Language Association Convention in Hartford, CT (March 17-20, 2016).

The deadline for abstract submissions is September 30, 2015.

[REMINDER] Use, Abuse, Abstinence: Reading Alcohol in Literature | NEMLA 2016, March 17-20 | Submission Deadline Sept. 30, 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 11:37am
Northeast Modern Language Association

This panel calls for papers that stake a claim in the cultural significance of representing alcohol or alcohol consumption. How do these representations relate to alcoholism as a disease and the alcoholic as an identity category? Does the text evaluate alcohol abuse morally or politically? Do communities organized around alcohol consumption facilitate social movements based on class, race, sexuality, or gender?

NCTE Affiliate MEJ seeks essays for 2015-2016 issue

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 7:50am
Minnesota English Journal / Minnesota Council of Teachers of English

Minnesota English Journal
Call for Submissions 2015-16

Editors: Scott Hall (Irondale High School) and Michael MacBride (Minnesota State University)

MEJ, the online journal of the Minnesota Council of Teachers of English, publishes scholarly articles, personal narratives, opinion/position pieces on topical teaching issues, short creative work (mostly poetry), and pieces focused on pedagogical strategies of major interest to English and Language Arts teachers of all instructional levels.

Edited Collection on the Portrayal of Black Men in Reality TV (Nov 30)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 7:27pm
Jervette R. Ward, Ph.D. / University of Alaska Anchorage

Contributions are being sought for a proposed edited collection that explores the portrayals of Black men in reality television. This collection aims to address representations of masculinity, comparisons to Black women in reality TV, class issues, queer theory, masculine psychology, patriarchal constructions, sexuality, invisibility, respectability, and social activism or lack of activism. This collection, tentatively titled There's No Blachelor: Portrayals of Black Men in Reality TV, is a follow-up to the book Real Sister: Stereotypes, Respectability, and Black Women in Reality TV (Rutgers University Press Oct/Nov 2015 - http://bit.ly/1NL1HdV ).

Pages