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Submit your poems to These Fragile Lilacs

updated: 
Saturday, April 25, 2015 - 10:31pm
These Fragile Lilacs Poetry Magazine

Submit your poems to These Fragile Lilacs
full name / name of organization:
These Fragile Lilacs Poetry Journal
contact email:
thesefragilelilacs@gmail.com
The deadline for submissions for our inaugural volume is May 31, 2015.
Visit our website: Thesefragilelilacspoetry.com
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Guidelines
Send submissions to thesefragilelilacs@gmail.com

Please do *not* include any attachments; instead, paste the poems you would like to be submitted directly into your email. You may submit up to five poems per submission cycle.

Black Affect and Minor Feelings DEADLINE MAY 18

updated: 
Saturday, April 25, 2015 - 4:11pm
Affect Theory Conference - Worldings, Tensions, Futures (Lancaster, PA)

Stream #2 – Black Affect and Minor Feelings, OCTOBER 14-17

"…we know for certain that the solution to the Black Man's problems will come only through Black National Consciousness. We also know that the focus of change will be racial. (If we feel differently, we have different ideas. Race is feeling…Art is one method of expressing these feelings and identifying the form as an emotional phenomenon."

– Amiri Baraka, "The Legacy of Malcolm X, and the Coming of the Black Nation"

Final Announcement: CFP for the Fandom and Neomedia Studies (FANS) Conference

updated: 
Saturday, April 25, 2015 - 2:36pm
Fandom and Neomedia Studies Association

We are pleased to announce a CFP for submissions to the Third Annual Fandom and Neomedia Studies (FANS) Conference in Dallas, TX, on 6 and 7 June 2015.

Fandom for us includes all aspects of being a fan, ranging from being a passive audience member to producing one's own parafictive or interfictive creations. Neomedia includes both new media as it is customarily defined as well as new ways of using and conceptualizing traditional media.

The Feeling of Time in Contemporary American Literature

updated: 
Saturday, April 25, 2015 - 12:38pm
2015 PAMLA Conference - Nov. 6-8 in Portland, OR



Briefly: A reader's sense of time in literature rests upon a fully embodied and affective reading experience. Amongst an author's mechanisms for communicating a shared sense of time with one's readers is the use of highly affective, visceral, and/or proprioceptive linguistic cues. I'm looking for work that either explains or demonstrates how the affective communication of felt time works in contemporary American literature. Interdisciplinary work especially encouraged. Panel to take place at the 2015 annual PAMLA conference in lovely Portland, OR, Nov. 6-8, under the title "Ethics and Affect III: Temporalities." Submit 300-word paper proposal to pamla.org/2015 by May 15.

[UPDATE] Speculative Fiction – SAMLA – November 13-15, 2015

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2015 - 6:34pm
Lisa Wenger Bro / Middle Georgia State College

Speculative fiction covers a broad range of narrative styles and genres. The cohesive element that pulls works together is that there is some "unrealistic" element, whether it's magical, supernatural, or even a futuristic, technological development: works that fall into the category stray from conventional realism in some way. For this reason, speculative fiction can be quite broad, including everything from fantasy and magical realism to horror and science fiction—from Gabriel García Márquez to H.P. Lovecraft to William Gibson. This panel aims to explore those unrealistic elements and all their varied implications about society, politics, economics, and more.

Creative Writing and Innovative Pedagogies Conference Call for Papers - deadline June 1st

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2015 - 3:46pm
Creative Writing and Innovative Pedagogies (CWIPs)

The exponential increase in Creative Writing degrees and programs at the undergraduate and graduate level has been well-documented, and much thought and scholarship has been devoted to the impact the Academy has on the writing community and subsequent creative output. However, there has been only a limited amount of public conversation about and research into the pedagogical approaches that have been or might be used in Creative Writing classrooms and programs. How are teachers of Creative Writing tweaking, extending, revolutionizing, or replacing the traditional Workshop model in their classrooms? What are or should be the academic and aesthetic goals of a Creative Writing class or program, and how can these goals be achieved?

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