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[UPDATE] Undergraduate papers in the Humanities

updated: 
Monday, November 23, 2015 - 11:56am
Valley Humanities Review

The Valley Humanities Review is currently seeking essays in the humanities for publication in its Spring 2016 Issue. We seek essays of high quality, intellectual rigor and originality that challenge or contribute substantially to ongoing conversations in the humanities. Topics may include but are not limited to: literature, history, religion, philosophy, art, art history and foreign languages. VHR is also currently seeking poetry, fiction, and non-fiction submissions; students may submit up to three poems or one other creative work. VHR is committed to undergraduate research and scholarship in the field; therefore, we only accept submissions by current or recently graduated undergraduate students.

"Poe & Blackness"; a Poe Studies Association panel, ALA meeting in San Francisco, 26 May 2016

updated: 
Monday, November 23, 2015 - 2:57am
William Engel / Poe Studies Association -- panel approved for Am Lit Assoc 26 May 2016

Blackness has been a topic of steady critical concern in Poe studies at least since Harry Levin's groundbreaking The Power of Blackness (1958). More recent critics have posited a metaphysics of race, where blackness is a coded means of discussing slavery—a topic that Poe (cognizant of his readership both above and below the Mason-Dixon line) never raises directly. Descriptions of black people range from Jupiter (the loyal, manumitted slave in "The Gold-Bug"), to the benign "negro valet," Pompey (appearing in several tales), to the mutinous sailor in Pym as well as the murderous South Sea natives. Blackness finds its avatar in the titular figure of "The Raven"; and its expression of abject horror in "MS.

[UPDATE] Natures 2016: Habitats and Hazards (11/30/15;2/19/16)

updated: 
Sunday, November 22, 2015 - 4:04pm
Natures 2016: the 8th annual interdisciplinary environmental humanities conference

We seek papers that explore the theme of "HABITATS AND HAZARDS" as applied to any of the texts (WRITTEN, VISUAL, MUSICAL, OR EMBODIED) of humanities studies: for example,
• THE HAZARDOUS SPACES OF ART OR LITERATURE
• DEPICTIONS OF POLLUTION OR WASTELAND
• DOMESTIC/URBAN/RURAL/WILD HABITATS
• STAGING/IMAGINING HISTORICAL SETTINGS
• LITERAL AND/OR FIGURATIVE TOXICITY

Identities on a Moving Platform: The linked Story Collection and the Lusophone Identity.

updated: 
Sunday, November 22, 2015 - 2:28pm
KULeuven- Belgium/ Minho University -Braga (Portugal)

The Portuguese Diaspora has left indelible marks on the literature it has produced even though few texts, let alone short story collections, have found their way into the fashionable criticism of canonized hyphenated literatures studied in short story studies. And yet, from its first manifestations still fully written in the Portuguese language ( José Rodrigues Migéis, e.g.) to the recent success of such writers as Anthony da Sa and Katharina Vaz, the short story cycle has played a pivotal role, not fully studied per se. The short story cycle or the collection of interlinked stories, or even the novel in stories, might be the unperceived and under valued genre produced by Portuguese writers living in the U.S.A.

[UPDATE] Mediascape META Section Call for Paper: Authorship

updated: 
Sunday, November 22, 2015 - 1:09pm
Grace Jung/Mediascape Magazine/UCLA

New media's ability to engage audiences alters the notion of media as static or absolute. Media today has a life of its own. Because of social media, the process of encoding today takes into account what the process of decoding will be like far more than ever before.

Mediascape META Section Call for Paper: Authorship

updated: 
Sunday, November 22, 2015 - 1:06pm
Grace Jung/Mediascape Magazine/UCLA

New media's ability to engage audiences alters the notion of media as static or absolute. Media today has a life of its own. Because of social media, the process of encoding today takes into account what the process of decoding will be like far more than ever before.

[UPDATE] Extended Deadline: 01/18/2016: The Weird and the Southern Imaginary

updated: 
Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 6:01am
Travis Rozier / Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz; Bob Hodges / University of Washington

Deadline extension: Our first round netted some excellent submissions, but we are extending the deadline for proposals to January 18, 2016.

Keynote: The Weird & the Southern Imaginary will introduce the aesthetics and generic conventions of the Weird to cultural studies of the U.S. South and the region's local, hemispheric, and (inter)national connections. Contributions from literary critics, film and popular culture scholars, philosophers, and critical theorists will consider forms of the Weird in a range of texts (literature, art, film & television, comics, music) from, about, or resonant with conceptions of different South(s).

[UPDATE] Keynote Announcement for IU English - "Digesting Discourses" #iuic16

updated: 
Friday, November 20, 2015 - 1:25pm
Hosted by the Graduate Students of the IU Department of English

We are very excited to announce our 2016 keynote speaker, Dr. Roopali Mukherjee, Associate Professor of Media Studies at Queens College!

We are issuing a Call for Proposals for scholarly and creative submissions for an international, interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference entitled "Digesting Discourses: Taste, Appetite, and Consumption," to be held at Indiana University—Bloomington, March 4-5, 2016. Join us for our 14th annual conference hosted by the graduate students of the IU Department of English.

Framing the Self(ie): Heterogeneity of Identities in (non)spaces

updated: 
Friday, November 20, 2015 - 10:28am
Romance Langues and Literature Grad Students Association

Identity is a complex, multi-faceted, often fragmented negotiation of social subjects and actors, yet it remains a central motif of human existence. While conscious creation of identity is more prevalent than ever, the emergence of mass social media also encourages the individual to create not only a self-identity, but an external presentation of that self, and alternate selves. On their Facebook timeline, blogs, Twitter, Instagram and more, individuals identify themselves, but also identify with relevant groups or trends by likes, hashtags, and pin it buttons. The "selfie" is the perfect materialization of this duality, as it produces an ephemeral identity struggling for greater recognition.

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