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Postmodern Gods and Monsters: Gender, Sexuality, Power--NEMLA Convention March 17-20, 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 12:36pm
Andrew Schopp/ Northeast Modern Language Association 2016 Conference

The postmodern god figure has been a staple of postmodern art at the very least since John Barth published Lost in the Funhouse, in which the god figure, both author and father, was simultaneously characterized as asleep, malevolent, kind, and/or insane. As this figure has penetrated popular culture, s/he has become more and more linked to investigations of gender and sexuality. These "god" figures strive to control the lives of others (e.g. Amy Dunne in Gone Girl, Tyler Durden in Fight Club, Kaiser Soze in The Usual Suspects). These puppet masters often work behind the scenes, exploiting the margins of society for either personal or social gain.

Unsettling Objects: Collecting in Nineteenth-Century America

updated: 
Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 10:16am
Reed Gochberg / C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists

This proposed panel for the 2016 C19 conference seeks paper proposals on the topic of collectors and collections in nineteenth-century American culture. In keeping with the conference's theme of "Unsettling," this panel aims to explore how examining practices of collecting opens up new approaches to considering American literature in relation to institutions, print and material culture, and scientific study. How does literature engage with the efforts of individual collectors or institutions to organize texts, natural specimens, material objects, and other forms of information? How did competing taxonomies unsettle existing modes of categorizing objects?

"Remeasuring Lyrical Pain" -- Seminar CFP -- ACLA Annual Meeting, Cambridge, MA, March 17–20, 2016

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 10:30pm
Jessica Tabak / Brown University

In recent scholarship, lyric emerges as a privileged form for expressing, simulating, and circulating pain: its formal flexibility, non-narrative structure, and somatic elements allow lyric to evoke an embodied sensation whose "resistance to language," as Elaine Scarry memorably argues, "is essential to what it is." Yet these characteristics do not adhere neatly to lyric. Not all lyrics are formally free and non-narrative. Furthermore, various literary genres employ the formal invention, non-narrative digressions, and somatic elements most often identified with the lyric form.

NeMLA Roundtable: "Beyond the Monster Inside: The Ethics of Fragmentation in the Long Nineteenth-Century": Due 9/30/15

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 3:36pm
NeMLA 2016: March 17-20, 2016

Doubles and doppelgangers abound in the Victorian Gothic novel and Miltonian readings have emphasized the inner monster as a nod to the period's desire to, in Tennyson's terms, "Move upward, working out the Beast, / And let the ape and tiger die" (In Memoriam). How does the trope of doubleness figure in other nineteenth-century contexts beyond the Gothic and its subterraneous influence?

Willa Cather as Modernist, 9/30/15; 3/17-3/20/16

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 11:56am
Northeast Modern Language Assoc (NeMLA)

This panel for the NeMLA 2016 Annual Convention, to be held in Hartford, Connecticut, from March 17 to March 20, 2016, will feature papers that explore Willa Cather as a Modernist writer. Fresh readings of any of Cather's works are welcome.

Panel: Visualizing Diversity in Children's Literature

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 11:55am
Diversity Committee, Children's Literature Association

Call for Papers
Visualizing Diversity in Children's Literature
Panel Sponsored by Children's Literature Association Diversity Committee
2016 Children's Literature Association Conference

1968 and Global Cinema - panel at SCMS Atlanta 2015 - Abstracts due AUG 5

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 9:46am
Society for Cinema and Media Studies

CfP- 2016 SCMS - 1968 + Global Cinema - 3/30-4/3/16 - Atlanta, Georgia

1968 and Global Cinema

Society for Cinema and Media Studies Annual Conference

Hilton Atlanta, March 30 - April 3, 2016

Although scholarship exists on the late 1960s New Waves, especially on in French New Wave vis-à-vis May '68 in Paris, scholarship that puts cinemas on 1968 into dialogue with one another across national boundaries is surprisingly lacking.

The Unsettling Politics of Nineteenth-Century Print, Abstract Deadline August 20

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 5:01am
C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists

While earlier centuries had witnessed the global spread of print, the nineteenth century contributed a new major chapter to the history of print in the Atlantic world, a chapter full of unsettling ironies. In this century, print became more accessible, since printing offices, owing to improved printing technologies, effective dissemination channels, and low-cost formats, were able to produce more efficiently. With print more accessible and affordable, printed material soon developed into a product of mass consumption that formed an integral part of everyday culture in the nineteenth century. Consequently, nineteenth-century print generated new audiences throughout the Atlantic world, such as working-class, black, and female readers.

'Facts and Fictions' - First Workshop of 'The Art of Identification' Network, University of Birmingham, Tuesday 13 October 2015

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 2:36am
The Art of Identification

The Art of Identification network, funded by a networking grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) intends to bring together a range of academics and practitioners in order to explore the interconnections between practical techniques of human identification and the artistic representation of personal identity. The methods by which people have proved, or been assigned, their identities have varied over time – from Early Modern insignia to the contemporary strobe light of a retinal scanner – and the term 'identification' can also be taken to mean a number of things, including the determination of individual personhood via paperwork, bodily examination, verbal testimony, and digital recording.

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