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[UPDATE] The comics of Julie Doucet and Gabrielle Bell (essay collection) Aug. 15, Proposals Due

updated: 
Monday, August 3, 2015 - 3:25pm
Tahneer Oksman and Seamus O'Malley

This proposed volume for the University Press of Mississippi's book series, Critical Approaches to Comics Artists, will examine the works of two influential cartoonists: Julie Doucet and Gabrielle Bell. These artists have helped shape the world of contemporary comics, particularly through their experiments in autobiography, travelogue, fantasy, and diary.

Call for Abstracts: "Departments as Villages: Re-imagining Grad. Student Relationships," NeMLA, Hartford, CT, March 17-20, 2016

updated: 
Monday, August 3, 2015 - 3:21pm
Sarah Heidebrink-Bruno/ Lehigh University/ NeMLA 2016

Many people are familiar with the expression, "It takes a village to raise a child,"—but perhaps, the same is true of graduate students. As graduate programs and the academic job market become increasingly competitive, many graduate students receive the implicit message that their fellow students are solely their competitors, both within a program and afterwards, rather than colleagues. This kind of tension can lead to students feeling disconnected from and unsupported by the very people who are sharing a similar struggle.

Analyses/Rereadings/Theories Journal - issue 5 call for articles

updated: 
Monday, August 3, 2015 - 3:08pm
University of Lodz

Analyses/Rereadings/Theories (A/R/T Journal) is a peer-reviewed journal that has been created with a view to providing a forum for analyzing and discussing issues of immediate relevance for contemporary literary and cultural studies.

The editors would like to invite submission of contributions for its fifth issue, to be published in December 2015. We invite original articles, reviews and interviews addressing any topics related to Anglophone literature and culture.

The contributions should be between 4000 and 6000 words long. Each contribution will be anonymously refereed by a reviewer (double-blind review). The deadline for the submission of manuscripts is 30 September 2015.

Seriously Funny: The Role of Satire and the Satirist in the 21st Century -- NeMLA 2016 (March 17-20, 2016)

updated: 
Monday, August 3, 2015 - 9:33am
Danielle Fuentes Morgan/ NeMLA (Northeast Modern Language Association)

Dave Chappelle walked away from a $50 million contract with Comedy Central, later explaining, "I want to make sure that I am dancing and not shuffling." Likewise, Stephen Colbert refused to allow his young children to watch his Colbert Report, in an effort to prevent their confusing his persona with their dad. This panel seeks proposals examining the role and responsibility of the satirist in the 21st century. How do satirists distinguish themselves (or not) from their satire and how does this impact audience understanding?

[UPDATE] Expanding the Field: Rethinking Projective Verse and Mid-Century American Poetry

updated: 
Sunday, August 2, 2015 - 11:50pm
The Charles Olson Society

The Charles Olson Society will sponsor a session at the annual Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900, to be held at the University of Louisville, February 18-20, 2016. We are interested in abstracts pertaining to any aspect of mid-Century American poetics, but in particular those that build on and problematize the mechanics of projective verse. While "Projective Verse" has received ample treatment in studies concerning major poets like Charles Olson and Robert Duncan, other poets built on projective verse in their own ways, fashioning distinctive styles that, while tangentially related to projective verse, also created new poetic forms.

Hartford CT 3/17-3/20/2016 NeMLA Lacan and Literature Panel, abstracts by 9/302015

updated: 
Sunday, August 2, 2015 - 10:38pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

Jacques Lacan refined and elaborated on the ideas of Freud. Freud liked to say he discovered the unconscious; Lacan liked to say that he discovered that the unconscious is structured like a language. Like Freud, Lacan found his own psychoanalytic thinking stimulated by reading literature. His seminar on "The Purloined Letter" by Poe is one lecture that comes to mind, but Lacan's later years were consumed by his exploration into the works of James Joyce. Papers are invited on any aspect of Lacan and Literature. Papers may be on specific literary figures like Poe and Joyce whose works Lacan explored, or consist of an in-depth analysis of Lacan's own writings and style.

Abu Ghraib and After; ACLA (March 17-20, 2016)

updated: 
Sunday, August 2, 2015 - 3:28pm
Megha Anwer / Purdue University

Last year (2014) marked the tenth anniversary of the leaked photographs from Abu Ghraib. Over this period these images of torture have been studied to serve as inputs for various discursive claims: the efficacy or the immorality of torture; and, when set alongside other well-known images of war-violence and lynching, they have been diagnosed as symptoms of a long history of American racism and neo-imperial agendas. The photographs, in short, have most commonly been read as valuable and interesting primarily for their evidentiary value, for answers they might offer to some preexisting question.

Feminist Pedagogy: Annual Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association in Hartford, CT, March 17-20, 2016

updated: 
Sunday, August 2, 2015 - 3:19pm
Kathleen Alves/NeMLA/CUNY

Feminist Pedagogy in the Two-Year College

How do two-year college instructors put feminist theory into pedagogical practice? This roundtable discusses forms of feminist pedagogy in the community college classroom. Participants are invited to share methods and ideas of pedagogy for teaching in women and gender studies and/or feminist approaches to learning and classroom strategies across the disciplines. Papers should aim to address gender and sexuality issues, along with race and class, within and outside the rapidly transforming academic space of the two-year college.

Jazz Literature from the 1950s: Papers in Honor of Ann and Samuel Charters (Panel)

updated: 
Sunday, August 2, 2015 - 2:36pm
James J. Donahue / SUNY Potsdam

60 years ago, the literary and musical landscapes were forever altered by several landmark works in music and literature. With "Pithecanthropus Erectus," Charles Mingus eschewed written arrangements in lieu of having his band mates learn the compositions by ear; on "Brilliant Corners," Thelonius Monk gave the world his arguably most complex composition; and "Saxophone Colossus" is widely regarded as Sonny Rollins's masterpiece. Similarly, 1956 witnessed the publication of Allen Ginsberg's "Howl and Other Poems," a landmark work with far-reaching aesthetic, political, and social implications; in a related vein, Jack Kerouac composed "Visions of Gerard," arguably his most personal and linguistically-complicated novel.

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