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SAMLA Special Session: Afterlife in the African Diaspora: A Seminar/Workshop (Abstracts 5/15/15;papers 10/1/15;conf 11/13-15/15)

updated: 
Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 2:30am
South Atlantic Modern Language Association Conference

This seminar/workshop seeks to spark a critical conversation about how historical subjects and historical texts within the African Diaspora get re-fashioned, re-animated, and re-articulated, as well as parodied, nostalgized, and defamiliarized, to establish an afterlife for African Atlantic identities and narratives. Participants will consider how—as transnational and transhistorical sites of memory—particular performances (textual, visual, or embodied) circulate and imagine anew the meaning of prior personal and textual narratives liberated from their originary context.

Call for #Panelists: #PopCulture #Parenting

updated: 
Monday, March 30, 2015 - 7:36pm
Fandom and Neomedia Studies Association

"Pop Culture Parenting" Call for Panelists

We are pleased to announce a call for panelists for a shared presentation entitled "Pop Culture Parenting." The focus will be on the elements of popular culture that may alternately be of concern or used as enlightening for children or student viewers. We would like to invite two panelists to join us in Dallas, Texas, on 6 June 2015. At present there are two panel members:

• Dr. Michael Vandehey, PhD, Professor of Psychology, Midwestern State University, specializing in child and developmental psychology
• J. Holder Bennett, MA, Associate Professor of History, Collin College, specializing in popular culture as a teaching tool

[UPDATE] CFP for Edited Collection, Stand Your Ground: Incarcerations, Lynchings, and Executions

updated: 
Monday, March 30, 2015 - 4:22pm
Chris Vanderwees and Percy Walton

With 5% of the world's population, the U.S. comprises 25% of the world's prison population, or 724 prisoners per 100,000 people (Pleases, Vicky, BBC News, March 8, 2013); it is not surprising, therefore, that many American Studies scholars see the U.S. as a police state. In addition, the "Stand Your Ground" laws, in one form or another, have been implemented in 46 states. Since the perpetrators under these "self-defence rulings" tend to be White men, and the victims young black men, Stand Your Ground laws, in effect, allow for a new form of lynching.

[UPDATE] Literature & Politics Panel @ SCMLA

updated: 
Monday, March 30, 2015 - 12:54pm
Ashley Bender / South Central Modern Language Association

We seek essays that explore the intersection of literature and politics. This session is open topic. The deadline has been extended to April 6.

Modernism and the Anthropocene (edited collection, DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 5/15/15)

updated: 
Monday, March 30, 2015 - 12:08pm
Jon Hegglund (Washington State University) and John McIntyre (University of Prince Edward Island)

We are seeking 500-word proposals for submissions to a collection of essays exploring the representation of the Anthropocene within modernist literature and culture. As a whole, the volume examines the emerging and complex relationship between Anglo-American modernism and its geological, climatological, and deep historical contexts, as it is articulated in a range of literary texts, movements, and expressions in the first half of the twentieth century.

Please email proposals and queries to
Jon Hegglund: hegglund@wsu.edu or
John McIntyre: jmcintyre@upei.ca

COLLABORATION & BETRAYAL

updated: 
Monday, March 30, 2015 - 11:25am
SAMLA #87 -- Durham, North Carolina -- November 2015

In its aesthetic and political senses, "collaboration" has a twofold, seemingly contradictory meaning. On the one hand, collaboration names a creative and democratically communicative sharing between individuals, disciplines, traditions, etc. Yet, on the other hand, this positive sense is countered by negative connotations of traitorous and nefarious "collaborationism." While the positive sense of collaboration has found academic credibility in its interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary guises, the negative connotations of collaboration refer us to traditions of appropriation, marginalization, and usurpation.

"The State and U.S. Culture Industries" Conference

updated: 
Monday, March 30, 2015 - 11:17am
United States Studies Centre Institute Building at the University of Sydney

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

"The State and U.S. Culture Industries" conference

June 25-26, 2015
United States Studies Centre
Institute Building (H03), University of Sydney

Keynotes: Tricia Jenkins (TCU); Jade Miller (Wilfrid Laurier); more TBC

Following recent scholarship (William Maxwell, Erin G. Carlston, Timothy Melley) that renews questions of state power, national security, and cultural production, this conference seeks to appraise critically, from a range of disciplinary perspectives, the contemporary and historical interrelations between the state and the culture industries in the United States. Topics for exploration include:

[UPDATE] CFP: Toy Stories: The Toy as Hero (DEADLINE EXTENDED)

updated: 
Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 10:21pm
Tanya Jones, M.Ed & Chris Stoneley

Abstracts are being welcomed for a proposed collection examining the toy as hero. Toys, a celebrated part of childhood and often key figures in children's imaginative play, have a fantastic history of heroism in print and on film. Open to examinations of literature, comics, and film, the collection seeks to be a repository of original essays that analyze the roles toys play as protectors of the child(ren) they love, as heroes of their own stories, or as champions for the greater good.

Possible pieces for consideration:

Margaret Atwood Studies seeks submissions [rolling]

updated: 
Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 3:17pm
Margaret Atwood Society

Margaret Atwood Studies, the journal of The Margaret Atwood Society, invites submissions on a rolling basis from both members and nonmembers. Essays submitted must be the original work of the author(s) and neither published nor under consideration for publication elsewhere. Essays should be focused primarily on the work of Margaret Atwood, between 2,500 and 7000 words, double-spaced, and documented following the conventions outlined in the latest MLA Handbook. To facilitate blind review, submissions should include a cover sheet with contact information and include no references to authorship in the essay. Submit via email as an attachment to Dr. Karma Waltonen at kjwaltonen@ucdavis.edu.

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