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Leon Edel Prize (11/1/15)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2015 - 12:58pm
Henry James Review

The Leon Edel Prize is awarded annually for the best essay on Henry James by a beginning scholar. The prize carries with it an award of $150, and the prize-winning essay will be published in HJR.

The competition is open to applicants who have not held a full-time academic appointment for more than four years. Independent scholars and graduate students are encouraged to apply.

Essays should be 20-30 pages (including notes), original, and not under submission elsewhere or previously published.

Send submissions to: hjamesr@louisville.edu

Author's name should not appear on the manuscript.

Somewhere Else: Teaching Literatures of Refugee Experience in a U.S. Context (NeMLA, Hartford, CT, March 17-20, 2016)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2015 - 11:47am
Justine Dymond

In "Refugee Memories and Asian American Critique," Viet Thanh Nguyen suggests that a category of refugee literatures outside of disciplinary borders of national literatures "allow[s] a different set of connections across time and space that point somewhere else besides assimilation into the nation and to affiliations with other people besides US citizens" (934). What connections are necessary to make, and what kinds of borders do we have to cross, in the teaching of refugee literatures? With Nguyen's words in mind, this roundtable session aims to explore our encounters with literatures of refugee experience in the classroom.

[UPDATE] Deadline Extended: Audiovisualtopia: A Conference on the Contemporary Screen scene

updated: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2015 - 10:37am
Brian Goss, Saint Louis University, Madrid Campus, Communications Dept.

One hundred twenty years after the Lumiere Brothers' Arrival of a Train at Ciotat Station / L'arrivée d'un train en gare de La Ciotat and about 60 years after the insinuation of television...into living rooms across the industrialized world, contemporary societies are saturated with audiovisual culture. More recently, the rise of widely affordable techno-substrates for production (digital photography) and exhibition (youtube, proliferating film festivals) are clearly enabling toward the "democratization" of audiovisual sophistication, such that the committed college sophomore can readily produce polished short films. In other words, there is much to celebrate!

Mark Twain, Then and Now

updated: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2015 - 9:44am
NeMLA, the Northeast Modern Language Association

Mark Twain was a prolific writer whose career spanned a tumultuous time in American history. Beyond being prolific, Twain was also comfortable experimenting with a variety of genres of writing from fiction to non-fiction travel essays and humorous sketches that blur the boundaries between fact and fiction. This panel would look at a variety of works and ask questions such as: How did Twain treat themes like race, gender, the environment and income inequality? Also, in what ways was Twain a product of his time, how were his works shaped by the world around him and how do they resonate today?

This panel will take place at NeMLA's 2016 convention in Hartford, CT between March 17 and March 20.

CFP Monster-Themed Papers for Halloween 2015 Conference (7/15/15; NEPCA 10/30-31/15)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2015 - 2:42am
Michael A Torregrossa / Science Fiction, Fantasy, Horror, and Legend Area Chair, Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association

REVISED FINAL CALL FOR PAPERS

MORE MONSTERS FOR THE EIGHTH-ANNIVERSARY SESSIONS OF THE

SCIENCE FICTION, FANTASY, HORROR, AND LEGEND AREA

Online at NEPCA Fantastic: http://nepcafantastic.blogspot.com

2015 Conference of The Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association (NEPCA)

Colby-Sawyer College in New London, New Hampshire

Friday 30 October and Saturday 31 October 2015

Proposals no later than by 15 July 2015

C19 -- Historicism Unsettled: Reading the Nineteenth Century (March 17-20 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 30, 2015 - 8:04pm
Andrew Kopec/C19: Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists

In their introduction to surface reading, Sharon Marcus and Stephen Best find in nineteenth-century American literature an analog to describe their method: "As Poe's story 'The Purloined Letter' continues to teach us," they write, "what lies in plain sight is worthy of attention but often eludes observation." Of perhaps of more immediate relevance to the members of C19, for Russ Castronovo, in his recent J19 essay "Occupy Bartleby," Occupy Wall Street's appropriation of "Bartleby, the Scrivener" invites a series of meditations on the transtemporal unsettlings of Melville's powerful story, the differences between professional criticism and public reading practices, and whether or not the public's commitment to reading Melville analogically unsettles critiq

Studies in the Novel Affiliate Website: Digital Humanities Pedagogy (July 25)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 30, 2015 - 11:26am
Studies in the Novel Affiliate Website

The editorial team at Studies in the Novel is seeking content for its online archive of indexed teaching tools on the journal's affiliate website. I am seeking pedagogical content that addresses teaching novels using digital humanities tools/perspective. Please consider submitting sample course syllabi, specific assignments, short narrative descriptions of your own experiences, or other appropriate content.

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