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1968 and Global Cinema - panel at SCMS Atlanta 2015 - Abstracts due AUG 5

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 9:46am
Society for Cinema and Media Studies

CfP- 2016 SCMS - 1968 + Global Cinema - 3/30-4/3/16 - Atlanta, Georgia

1968 and Global Cinema

Society for Cinema and Media Studies Annual Conference

Hilton Atlanta, March 30 - April 3, 2016

Although scholarship exists on the late 1960s New Waves, especially on in French New Wave vis-à-vis May '68 in Paris, scholarship that puts cinemas on 1968 into dialogue with one another across national boundaries is surprisingly lacking.

The Unsettling Politics of Nineteenth-Century Print, Abstract Deadline August 20

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 5:01am
C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists

While earlier centuries had witnessed the global spread of print, the nineteenth century contributed a new major chapter to the history of print in the Atlantic world, a chapter full of unsettling ironies. In this century, print became more accessible, since printing offices, owing to improved printing technologies, effective dissemination channels, and low-cost formats, were able to produce more efficiently. With print more accessible and affordable, printed material soon developed into a product of mass consumption that formed an integral part of everyday culture in the nineteenth century. Consequently, nineteenth-century print generated new audiences throughout the Atlantic world, such as working-class, black, and female readers.

'Facts and Fictions' - First Workshop of 'The Art of Identification' Network, University of Birmingham, Tuesday 13 October 2015

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 2:36am
The Art of Identification

The Art of Identification network, funded by a networking grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) intends to bring together a range of academics and practitioners in order to explore the interconnections between practical techniques of human identification and the artistic representation of personal identity. The methods by which people have proved, or been assigned, their identities have varied over time – from Early Modern insignia to the contemporary strobe light of a retinal scanner – and the term 'identification' can also be taken to mean a number of things, including the determination of individual personhood via paperwork, bodily examination, verbal testimony, and digital recording.

[UPDATE] "Daddy, What did you Do in the Culture Wars?": Academia and Public Life - NeMLA 2016

updated: 
Sunday, July 19, 2015 - 9:06pm
Northeastern Modern Language Association - Hartford CT, March 17-20, 1016

It's been almost thirty years since Allan Bloom made his clarion call to classicism within the American academy with the publication of The Closing of the American Mind. For as moribund as the humanities have supposedly been (according to positivist scientists, economics majors, and higher education administrators) the "Culture Wars" have surely blazed a bright path across the consciousness of any literature, history, philosophy, theology or cultural studies major. Columnists from William Safire to David Brooks have bemoaned the supposed death of the humanities (while conveniently ignoring how supply-side economics has had a hearty role in that) identifying a "post-modern bogeyman" as being responsible for the murder.

The Novel and Digital Humanities: Seeking Teaching Tools (July 25)

updated: 
Sunday, July 19, 2015 - 2:33pm
Studies in the Novel Affiliate Website

The editorial team at Studies in the Novel is seeking content for its online archive of indexed teaching tools on the journal's affiliate website. I am seeking pedagogical content that addresses teaching novels using digital humanities tools/perspective. Please consider submitting sample course syllabi, specific assignments, short narrative descriptions of your own experiences, or other appropriate content. The next deadline for submission is July 25.

Proposed Edited Collection on American Women Writers and Liminality 10 Dec 2015

updated: 
Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 3:03pm
Society for the Study of American Women Writers

CALL FOR PAPERS FOR A PROPOSED SSAWW EDITED COLLECTION
CALL FOR SENIOR SCHOLAR TO WRITE PREFACE

The Society for the Study of American Women Writers (SSAWW) is seeking abstracts (250 words) for essays (7500-8500 words, excluding notes) on American women writers and liminality for a proposed edited collection. We also seek a senior scholar in the field of American women writers to write the preface to the collection and, if interested, join the team as a co-editor.

The Weird & the Southern Imaginary - Edited Collection

updated: 
Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 2:06pm
Travis Rozier / Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz; Bob Hodges / University of Washington

Keynote: The Weird & the Southern Imaginary will introduce the aesthetics and generic conventions of the Weird to cultural studies of the U.S. South and the region's local, hemispheric, and (inter)national connections. Contributions from literary critics, film and popular culture scholars, philosophers, and critical theorists will consider forms of the Weird in a range of texts (literature, art, film & television, comics, music) from, about, or resonant with conceptions of different South(s).

Don DeLillo: "Fiction Rescues History" Conference - Paris, February 18-20, 2016

updated: 
Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 12:35pm
Antoine Cazé / Université Paris Diderot - LARCA (Laboratoire de Recherche sur les Cultures Anglophones)

"Don DeLillo: 'Fiction Rescues History'" Conference
Paris - February 18-20, 2016

Guest of Honor: Don DeLillo (with the support of Actes Sud Editions)

Plenary Speakers:
Peter Boxall, University of Sussex
Michael Naas, DePaul University

LARCA – Laboratoire de recherches sur les cultures anglophones (UMR 8225, Université Paris Diderot)
VALE – Voix anglophones, littérature et esthétique (EA 4085, Université Sorbonne Paris 4)
ERIAC – Équipe de recherche interdisciplinaire sur les aires culturelles (EA 4705, Université de Rouen)

ACLA 2016: Pedagogy, in Theory

updated: 
Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 12:02pm
Carolyn Laubender/ Duke University

As two of the three famous "hermeneutics of suspicion", Marxism and psychoanalysis both have an important but conflicted relationship with the work of education. As Lenin writes in 1918, "Marxism educates the vanguard of the proletariat which is capable of assuming power … of being the teacher, the guide, the leader of all the laboring and exploited people" (The State of the Revolution). Less than twenty years later, Freud will pessimistically reflect on the state of the psychoanalytic "cure", saying that "it almost appears that the analyst's work might be the third of those 'impossible' professions in which, even before you begin, you can be sure you will fall short of complete success.

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