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The Great Depression in Children's Literature: Celebrating the 40th Anniversary of Mildred Taylor's Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry

updated: 
Friday, August 12, 2016 - 9:18am
Cambridge/Homerton Research & Teaching Centre for Children’s Literature, Cambridge University (UK)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 23, 2016

Registration now open for a symposium at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge

Dates: Friday 23rd & Saturday 24th September 2016

Keynote speakers: Michelle Martin, University of Washington, and Gabrielle Cliff-Hodges, University of Cambridge

The Symbolic Role of Agriculture in Anglophone/American Fiction

updated: 
Friday, August 12, 2016 - 8:53am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NEMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

“Those who labour in the earth are the chosen people of God, if ever he had a chosen people…” (Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia, Query XIX). This quote from Thomas Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia (1785) represents an attitude towards agriculture and specifically the family farm that remains influential in the United States today. Connection to the land is still viewed as sacred even as less people work on the land as farmers and ranchers (two percent according to the last census) and environmentalists struggle to reclaim the “soul” of agriculture from the industrial interests that have reshaped farming and the American farmer.

Teaching War Literature Since 9-11 (Roundtable Session)

updated: 
Friday, August 12, 2016 - 8:53am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NEMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Many faculty came of age in the Post-Vietnam War era. This time period was shaped by the writings of Tim O’Brien in The Things They Carried and the films Platoon directed by Oliver Stone, Full Metal Jacket directed by Stanley Kubrick, and The Deer Hunter directed by Michael Cimino. These stories challenged the image of the United States as a land of righteous warriors protecting the world from oppression. Instead, soldiers were the pawns of forces they didn’t understand, forces that were bent on a neo-colonial domination of the world. Then came 9/11 and everything changed. Or did it?

Call for Papers: American Borderlands of Race and Ethnicity (Philosophy & Literature)

updated: 
Friday, August 12, 2016 - 8:52am
Dylan Winchock / CSU San Marcos
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

We are currently seeking finished, previously unpublished articles for an edited anthology under contract, entitled “Transgressing the Limit: Borders and Liminality in Philosophy and Literature.” This article will serve as a substitute piece for an author who has dropped out of the process.

 

The Russians Were Coming

updated: 
Friday, August 12, 2016 - 8:50am
Bulldog Review
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

The Bulldog Review invites scholarly and research papers, personal essays, interviews and creative content on the theme of the manifestation of Soviet paranoia in pop culture, the arts and American society from the mid 1950s through the 1980s for its inaugural issue. There has been a resurgence of the topic as of late with projects like The Americans and Bridge of Spies, as well as the invasion of the Crimean Peninsula and Russian Federation doping scandal at this year's Olympics.  We encourage submissions which approach the subject directly and specifically, as well as papers which interpret the theme in a broader sense.

 

[UPDATE: Deadline extended] The Female Science Fiction Western (Abstracts due August 15, 2016; collection of essays)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:48pm
Melanie A. Marotta / Kolin Ford
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 15, 2016

We are seeking original, previously unpublished essays for a collection tentatively titled The Science Fiction Western: Representation of Female Characters in the Late Twentieth and Twenty-first Century Media. In reference to historians' accounts of the frontier, Susan Armitage writes that "Women are either absent or incidental to the story". While women may have been attracted to the Frontier Myth concept, they are infrequently the main focus of American Western stories. Adult males, however, appeared prominently within literature in connection to this myth.

Bring Out Your Undead: Undead South/Undead Nation

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:46pm
Southern American Studies Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 10, 2016

This proposed session for SASA 2017 pushes and pulls beyond traditional notions of the “gothic,” horror, and hauntings, instead engaging with more expansive ideas enabled by recent theorizations of undeadness. Special attention will be given to proposals that link forms of undeadness associated in some way with the American South to formulations in or across other regions and nations. What is "undead nation," and how might we understand it in relation to undead Souths? How does undeadness migrate and circulate across regional and national frames and at the same time backlight gender, sexuality, race, settler colonialism, and more?

Acting Age in the Long Eighteenth Century

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:46pm
NEMLA 2017
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Recent work in performance studies have trenchantly analyzed constructs of identity, gender, and race in the Long Eighteenth Century. In Rival Queens, for example, Felicity Nussbaum explores how actresses of the eighteenth century embodied and challenged femininity through their roles on and off the stage, roles that blended together in the mind of a public audience. But enlightening performance studies such as Nussbaum's do not often, however, account for age. Age cuts across gender, race, and class.

Migration, Diaspora, Circulation and Translation

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:46pm
Charles Brockden Brown Society
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Migration, Diaspora, Circulation and Translation 

October 5-7, 2017

University College Dublin, Clinton Institute for American Studies

Dublin, Ireland

A conference sponsored by the Charles Brockden Brown Society

(www.brockdenbrownsociety.ucf.edu

1980s Nostalgia in 21st Century Film and Television

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:46pm
Douglas A. Cunningham / Society of Cinema and Media Studies Conference, Chicago, March 2016
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 19, 2016

This is a call for proposals on 1980s nostalgia in 21st-century film and television.  Topics may include, but are not limited to, films and programs such as TRON: LEGACY, SUPER 8, STRANGER THINGS, CREED, and THE EXPENDABLES series, among many others.  A variety of disciplinary approaches is welcome.  Please send a 300-word proposal, a 50-word bio, and a list of at least five relevant sources to Dr. Doug Cunningham at dcunningham@westminstercollege.edu.  The Society for Cinema and Media Studies Annual Conference will be held in Chicago between March 22 and March 26, 2017.

EXTENDED DEADLINE: Her Exiled Children: Ireland and Irish America - ACIS-West, U of Montana, Oct. 20-22

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:30pm
American Conference for Irish Studies - West
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 26, 2016

The 32nd Annual Meeting of the American Conference for Irish Studies Western Regional

 “Her Exiled Children: Ireland and Irish America”

 Missoula, Montana

 October 20 – 22, 2016

 Submissions due August 26 at http://acisweb.org/regionals/western/submissions/

World Pictures: Rethinking Encyclopaedic Fictions (ACLA 2017, Utrecht, July 6-9)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:30pm
Kiron Ward (University of Sussex)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 23, 2016

Encyclopaedic fictions are being studied increasingly comparatively: with such studies as Hilary Clark’s The Fictional Encyclopaedia (1990), Franco Moretti’s Modern Epic (1996), Stefano Ercolino’s The Maximalist Novel (2014), and Paul St. Amour’s Tense Future (201 5), as well as forthcoming studies like Nick Levey’s Maximalism in Contemporary American Literature (2016) and Antonio Barrenechea’s America Unbound (2016), critical attention has turned to assessing the commonalities between these daunting, ambitious, totalising texts—and away from single-author approaches.

Special Issue: Economies of the Gift in an Age of Austerity

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:29pm
NANO: New American Notes Online
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 1, 2016

Gift exchange is odd, even paradoxical. Giving requires calculation; one must consider the recipient’s need and one’s capacities. And, after the gift is given, expectation sets in. Was it well received? Will it be reciprocated? As many have noted, the gift, though ostensibly selfless, is very much an interested activity. All the calculations leading up to and following a gift exchange reveal the rules that govern a society, even the tacit ones. The gift is an object and a process. The gift moves, and it also—as a keepsake or memorial—stays put. The gift is personal, social, and cosmic.

 

Heritage Tourism and Race in the early Americas

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:24pm
Cathy Rex for Society of Early Americanists (Tulsa, March 2017)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 21, 2016

Dear colleagues,

Below is a call for proposals for a traditional panel at the SEA in Tulsa March 4-7, 2017.
Please feel free to be in touch with questions. 

 

Heritage Tourism and Race in the Early Americas

Cathy Rex, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

REXCJ@uwec.edu

This panel seeks to explore the ways in which early American landmarks, events, sites,

and even gift shops, are marketed as authentic “heritage” tourist experiences but often

ignore the complex racial dynamics that undergird them and recolonize historic peoples

Watchung Review Call for Articles

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 1:39pm
Watchung Review
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Watchung Review invites scholarly papers on the theme of migrations and identity. This is a timely topic, both in academic work and in the media, and one which calls on the rich work of postcoloniality, movement and migration in literature, rhetoric, and interdisciplinary studies on migration and identity.  We encourage submissions which approach these deeply political issues head on, and also papers which interpret the theme more broadly by investigating issues of migration arising in a variety of periods, intellectual spaces and through a range of critical and theoretical lenses.

Topics of interest may include but are not limited to:

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