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UPDATE EXTENDED DEADLINE NOW JULY 1ST

updated: 
Thursday, June 18, 2015 - 6:21pm
Go West! Western Area 2015 Film & History Conference

It seems that someone is always travelling somewhere in the Western. Be it progressive or populist, romantic or realistic, epic or tragic the American errand into the Western's wilderness transmits sets of assumptions about the American Character and the American Experience. Commenting on the economic, psychological, political, and social fluidities of American life, the Western frontier is itself constantly in flux.

Critiquing Culture

updated: 
Thursday, June 18, 2015 - 4:47pm
The Cultural Studies Program at George Mason University

The Cultural Studies Student Organizing Committee (SOC) at George Mason University invites paper proposals for our 9th annual Cultural Studies Graduate Student Conference. The conference will take place on Saturday, September 26th, 2015 at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia.

CALL FOR PAPERS

Call for Chapters: Representations of Poverty in US Pop Culture (9/1/2015 deadline)

updated: 
Thursday, June 18, 2015 - 1:48pm
Wylie Lenz

Chapter proposals are invited for an edited collection tentatively titled Representing the Other Half: Essays on Poverty in American Popular Culture. The volume will seek to interrogate the ways in which poverty has been depicted (and/or ignored) across a variety of media, including but not limited to fiction, non-fiction, poetry, film, photography, painting, music, radio, etc.

Questions to consider: When, why, and how do producers of popular culture represent and/or ignore poverty? How do those representations influence the idea of poverty in the American cultural imaginary? In turn, how does that imaginary interact with policy? What role might the scholar/critic play in this process?

John Jay College of Criminal Justice's 4th Law and Literature Conference (October 30-Nov1 2015))

updated: 
Wednesday, June 17, 2015 - 10:56pm
The John Jay College of Criminal Justice’s 4th Law and Literature Conference

This conference considers literary renderings of labor concerns, broadly defined, to explore law.

The responsibility of the state described by Plato, the contracts written by Shakespeare's Shylock, or the works delving into the plight of modern laborers all explore the intersections between Literature and Law. This conference will explore the way that literary renderings of labor concerns, broadly defined, have responded to or have influenced the law.

The 2015 John Jay College of Criminal Justice's Law and Literature Conference is especially interested in the following areas although all submissions will be considered.

SFFTV CFP: Special Issue on Mad Max franchise

updated: 
Wednesday, June 17, 2015 - 4:51pm
Dan Hassler-Forest

Science Fiction Film and Television seeks submissions for a special issue on the Mad Max franchise.
Guest editor: Dan Hassler-Forest

UNApocalypse: Exploring Dystopianism in Texts

updated: 
Wednesday, June 17, 2015 - 3:35pm
University of North Alabama English Department

Call for Papers:
The University of North Alabama English Department
Announces the 7th Annual Alabama Regional Graduate Conference in English
February 26-27, 2016

UNApocalypse: Exploring Dystopianism in Texts

[UPDATE] Nabokov on Politics (SAMLA 87)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 17, 2015 - 2:56pm
Benjamin Mangrum / Davidson College

In a later preface to Bend Sinister (1947), Vladimir Nabokov claims, "the influence of my epoch on my present book is as negligible as the influence of my books, or at least of this book, on my epoch." The conventional reading of Nabokov as an aesthete who is insistent upon sharp divisions between fictional and political worlds has its principal source in the author's stylization of his own career. Yet this way of reading Nabokov has been complicated through such recent studies as Andrea Pitzer's The Secret History of Vladimir Nabokov.

Translated Memories

updated: 
Wednesday, June 17, 2015 - 9:30am
Bettina Hofmann, University of Wuppertal

Translated Memories": Transgenerational Perspectives in Literature on the Holocaust
July 14, 2015, Steinheim Institute in Essen, Germany
This coolloquium addresses a subject which—70 years after the end of World War II—is of vital interest even today: How can memories of the Holocaust be constituted and transformed in a transgenerational and transnational perspective?
Three authors, all writing in English, and four literary scholars, hailing from Germany, Great Britain, and the U.S., will reflect on this subject based on their own and other literary texts.

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