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Edited Collection: Modernism in the Green (Abstract Deadline: May 15)

updated: 
Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 2:48pm
Julia Daniel and Margaret Konkol / Baylor University and New College of Florida

For all its many urban topographies, the literary landscape of modernism contains a startling array of greens. From William Carlos Williams's representations of Garret Mountain Park, to Peter's reflections on Mrs. Dalloway in Regents Park or Wallace Stevens' frequent use of Elizabeth Park throughout his oeuvre, planned green spaces play an overlooked role in the development of modernism. We propose that thinking with and through public greens leads to a fresh and often more complex understanding of modernism's tangled engagements with arts, politics, material culture, bodies, and the nature-culture divide.

[UPDATE] DEADLINE EXTENDED: APRIL 5: MMLA 2015: Animals in Literature and Film

updated: 
Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 2:40pm
Julia Dauer, MIdwest Modern Language Association

This year's MMLA Animals in Literature and Film panel invites papers engaging this year's conference theme "Arts and Sciences," and especially the connection between the history of science and animals.

Papers might consider eighteenth- or nineteenth-century natural history writing and/or collection practices; contemporary or historical discourse around animal experimentation; conceptual issues of animacy, animality, and/or "life"; taxidermy; issues of animality or personhood in contemporary science, medicine, literature, or film; issues of extinction and/or species revival; or figures of "monstrous animals" produced by science, from Frankenstein to Godzilla to the dinosaurs reanimated to populate Jurassic Park.

International Conference: Vulnerabilty 8-9 October 2015

updated: 
Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 4:29am
E. A. CLIMAS, Bordeaux Montaigne University, FRANCE

Etymologically, vulnerability refers to a "wound" (from the Latin vulnus, vulneris). Somebody is said to be vulnerable when they have been wounded, injured, hurt or harmed. Or indeed when they are in a state of greater weakness, more fragile, and therefore more easily wounded, injured, hurt or harmed. Vulnerability can be physical, moral and social. An individual, a group, a community, even a country can be vulnerable.

Portable Prose: The Novel and the Everyday

updated: 
Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 1:39am
University of Sydney

We are looking for papers for our volume 'Portable Prose: The Novel and the Everyday'. The collection will build on and extend work coming out of a conference, 'The Prosaic imaginary', held at the University of Sydney, NSW, Australia in July 2014. We aim to explore the privileged relationship between the novel genre and categories of the 'prosaic' or 'everyday'. Building on John Plotz's notion of the novel as exemplary 'portable property', we seek to interrogate the relationship between novel-reading as an everyday activity and the novel's prosaic subject matter, whether this is conceived as material object, cultural practice, or speech act.

[UPDATE] Neoliberalism in Literature and Film

updated: 
Wednesday, April 1, 2015 - 8:19pm
Michael Blouin / Milligan College

During the past seventy years, neoliberal thinkers have strategically reinvented classical liberal ideals in order to privilege a sense of personal freedom above the perceived overreach of government intervention. Once considered a fringe movement, neoliberalism has steadily become the central tenet of American life. It is now nearly impossible, for example, to imagine any mainstream voice espousing tax hikes or championing the sorts of policies enacted under Franklin Delano Roosevelt or Lyndon Johnson. Promises of privatization today trump collective action in virtually every aspect of life. This epistemic shift can be felt far and wide, from politicians to postmodern theorists.

Panel at SAMLA November 13 - 15

updated: 
Wednesday, April 1, 2015 - 8:12pm
Michael Blouin / Milligan College

During the past seventy years, neoliberal thinkers have strategically reinvented classical liberal ideals in order to privilege a sense of personal freedom above the perceived overreach of government intervention. Once considered a fringe movement, neoliberalism has steadily become the central tenet of American life. It is now nearly impossible, for example, to imagine any mainstream voice espousing tax hikes or championing the sorts of policies enacted under Franklin Delano Roosevelt or Lyndon Johnson. Promises of privatization today trump collective action in virtually every aspect of life. This epistemic shift can be felt far and wide, from politicians to postmodern theorists.

American Criminology & Penology

updated: 
Wednesday, April 1, 2015 - 3:33pm
Midwest Modern Language Association

This panel seeks to explore the 2015 MMLA Convention theme of "Arts and Sciences" by examining the intersection between artistic representation and scientific (or, pseudoscientific) inquiry into crime and punishment.

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