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Living Legacies: Literary Responses to the Civil Rights Movement

updated: 
Wednesday, April 2, 2014 - 6:26pm
full name / name of organization: 
Laura Dubek
contact email: 

Fifty years after the March on Washington, students of American history, literature, and media studies learn about the civil rights movement from (auto)biographies of movement leaders, archival footage of major events, narrative and oral history presented in documentaries such as Eyes on the Prize (PBS), civil rights museums and special exhibits, annual commemorations, and retrospective analyses provided by critical race scholars in response to contemporary events. This edited collection will explore how poets, playwrights, novelists, essayists, and filmmakers—at the time and since—have contributed to our understanding of the civil rights movement and its legacy.

"Heroes in Popular Culture": MPCA Conference, Indianapolis, IN. Oct. 3-5, 2014.

updated: 
Wednesday, April 2, 2014 - 3:58pm
full name / name of organization: 
Jef Burnham, DePaul University
contact email: 

Deadline: April 30, 2014

Papers can explore any topic relating to heroes and/or prevailing notions of heroism as they present themselves in popular culture. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

-Superheroes and action stars as heroic icons
-Video games and the experience of vicarious heroism
-Connections between violence and heroism
-The gendering of heroism
-Heroines in young adult fiction
-Anti-heroes in film and television
-Heroes and religion/mythology
-Hero worship
-Real world heroes in the news and biographies

Announcing Reconstruction 14.1 The Undead Arcade

updated: 
Wednesday, April 2, 2014 - 1:40pm
full name / name of organization: 
Reconstruction: Studies in Contemporary Culture

Introducing Reconstruction: Studies in Contemporary Culture
Issue 14.1 The Undead Arcade
Featuring original artwork by Amanda Lee Stillwell
Introduction to the issue by Carly A. Kocurek and Sam Tobin
Articles
The Midway in the Museum: Arcades, Art, and the Challenge of Displaying Play, by Jennifer deWinter
Innovation, Imitation, and the Continued Importance of Vintage Video Games, by Brendan Gaughen
The Intertextual Arcade: tracing histories of arcade clones in 1980s Britain, by Alison Gazzard
Scott Pilgrim vs. The Casual Gamer: Pastiched Chip Music and Cultural Identity, by Megan McKittrick
Interview

Submissions for the annual Charlotte Perkins Gilman Society Newsletter due April 25, 2014.

updated: 
Wednesday, April 2, 2014 - 12:53pm
full name / name of organization: 
Charlotte Perkins Gilman Society

The Charlotte Perkins Gilman Society is looking for pieces to include in its annual newsletter. We welcome short articles or book reviews (500-750 words) pertaining to Gilman and her work; citations for recent or forthcoming Gilman-related publications; news items such as announcements about conferences or panels (including calls for papers),archival reports, notification of new web resources, or short discussions of using Gilman texts in the classroom.
Submission deadline is Friday, April 25. Accepted submissions will appear in the annual Gilman Society Newsletter to be published in May 2014. You may email attachments (and inquiries) to stefanie.sydelnik@rochester.edu.

ATDS Emerging Scholars Panel (ATHE)

updated: 
Wednesday, April 2, 2014 - 11:57am
full name / name of organization: 
The American Theatre and Drama Society
contact email: 

Deadline Extended to April 10, 2014

Curtains Up – ATDS Emerging Scholars Panel (ATHE)

CALL FOR PAPERS


The Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE) 2014 Conference

Scottsdale, Arizona
Fairmont Scottsdale Princess Hotel 

"Dream Acts: Performance as Refuge, Resistance, and Renewal"
July 24 – 27, 2014

Please note: Emerging scholars must not have previously presented at a major, national conference.

FANS Conference [UPDATE]

updated: 
Wednesday, April 2, 2014 - 11:04am
full name / name of organization: 
Fandom and Neomedia Studies (FANS) Association
contact email: 

Updated hotel information:

We are pleased to announce a CFP for submissions to the Second Annual Fandom and Neomedia Studies (FANS) Conference in Dallas, TX, on 7 and 8 June 2014. We are privileged to have Gilles Poitras as our keynote speaker.

Fandom for us includes all aspects of being a fan, ranging from being a passive audience member to producing one's own parafictive or interfictive creations. Neomedia includes both new media as it is customarily defined as well as new ways of using and conceptualizing traditional media.

MSA16: Modernism and Found Objects, (6-9 November 2014), Due April 30th

updated: 
Wednesday, April 2, 2014 - 9:48am
full name / name of organization: 
Modernist Studies Association: MSA16 Pittsburgh

Found objects are a major feature of modernist art, whether the plastic arts or urban narratives. Object-centered considerations of literary modernism vary from the placement of materials within texts (as with the poetry of Marianne Moore) to the detournement of objects by the later avant-gardes (such as the Situationists) What does the modernist fascination with mundane objects tell us about the affect of the collector, or the artist, or modernist affect more generally? What does the representation of lost and found objects, souvenirs, curios, and window displays disclose about modernism? What do these narratives suggest about the perceived role of the modern metropolis in reproducing capitalism?

Networks of Modernism MSA 16 Pittsburgh Nov 6-9 [UPDATE]

updated: 
Tuesday, April 1, 2014 - 2:49pm
full name / name of organization: 
Matthew N. Hannah / University of Oregon
contact email: 

In his essay "What is a City?" (1937) Lewis Mumford describes the metropolis as "a related collection of primary groups and purposive associations" (93). His account of the city parallels twentieth-century conceptions of modernity as a vast grid of interconnected individuals. As the nineteenth century transitioned to the twentieth, populations increasingly congregated in massive metropolitan hubs that organized disparate individuals into a loosely constructed unity. For many, the city began to exemplify this vision of individual collectivity, all lines joining to a hub.

CPF PAMLA Conference, 2014 Special Session: "That Old Black Magic": Temporality of Magic

updated: 
Tuesday, April 1, 2014 - 2:19pm
full name / name of organization: 
Sören Fröhlich / University of California, San Diego
contact email: 

Recent scholarship in the 'temporal turn' has raised fundamental questions in the intersection of time and cultural representations (). However, this scholarship frequently side-steps cultural representations of time as malleable and non-rational, as well as supernatural temporalities. Thinking alongside the 2014 PAMLA Conference theme "Familiar Spirits," this panel invites papers that consider the relation between magic and time.

Making and Being Made: Visual Representations and/of Citizenship (CAA, NYC, 11-14 Feb 15)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 1, 2014 - 1:26pm
full name / name of organization: 
Corey Dzenko and Theresa Avila/panel co-chairs for 2015 College Art Association conference

Traditionally defined by an individual's membership and level of participation within a community, scholars such as Eric Hobsbawm describe how "citizenship" results in access to benefits or rights. Yet citizenship moves beyond political framings. According to Aiwha Ong, cultural citizenship is a "dual process of self-making and being-made" but done so "within webs of power linked to the nation-state and civil society." Taking citizenship as a political position, cultural process, and intertwining of both, this panel examines the role of art and visual culture in reflecting, confirming, or challenging ideals of citizenship across historical periods and media.

« Ecritures plurielles de la Franco-Américanie d'aujourd'hui », atelier dirigé par Peggy Pacini (Université de Cergy-Pontoise)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 1, 2014 - 9:00am
full name / name of organization: 
ACQS 19th Biennial Conference, Montréal, QC, 16-19 octobre 2014

Dans l'épilogue à son ouvrage Les Franco Américains de la Nouvelle-Angleterre : rêve et réalités, Roby en 2000 offre une conclusion à la fois réaliste et pessimiste de la situation en Franco-Américanie à la fin des années 1980 : « il existe toujours des foyers de vie franco-américaine dynamiques à Manchester, à Worcester, à Orono et à Woonsocket. Cependant, la poigne de militants qui les animent s'essouffle sérieusement. Faute de relève, ils disparaissent de la scène l'un après l'autre sans être remplacés. » (490). La question que nous souhaitons soulever ici se porte précisément sur l'état de cette relève presque 25 ans plus tard. Qu'en est-il par exemple, du débat sur la « culture sans la langue » qui avait occupé les pages du FAROG Forum ?

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