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On the Philosophy of Autofiction (NeMLA 2019)

updated: 
Friday, July 27, 2018 - 9:14am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

NeMLA Annual Convention - Washington, D.C., March 21-24, 2019

Teaching American Literature: A Journal of Theory and Practice; October 31, 2018

updated: 
Thursday, July 26, 2018 - 9:07am
Patricia K. Bostian / Central Piedmont Community College
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, October 31, 2018

We seek intelligent critical articles written in a clear, readable style that offer our readers thoughtful, useful, pedagogically sound, and innovative ideas for teaching American literature. We are also interested in articles about new American authors or lesser known authors who haven't seen much study, particularly in ways that they could add to students' experiences of American literature. All articles go through a blind peer review process with editorial staff making all final publishing decisions.

2019 WALT WHITMAN INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL

updated: 
Thursday, July 26, 2018 - 9:06am
Walt Whitman Birthplace Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

Walt Whitman Birthplace Association (WWBA) invites you to attend the inaugural Walt Whitman International Festival (WWIF) to be held August 9-11, 2019 at Walt’s Birthplace on Long Island, NY, in celebration of Whitman’s Bicentennial birthday. Join this historic celebration.

Walt was born here in 1819 in a home built by his father. In Walt’s poem, “There Was a Child Went Forth,” he commemorates his Birthplace environs that “became part of that child who went forth every day, and who now goes, and will always go forth every day.”

"NATURE VS. CULTURE"

updated: 
Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 9:56am
17TH INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL STUDIES SYMPOSIUM
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, January 15, 2019

EGE UNIVERSITY 17TH INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL STUDIES SYMPOSIUM

 

“NATURE VS. CULTURE”

 

Ege University, Faculty of Letters, İzmir, TURKEY

May 8-10, 2019

“Mementos and the Nineteenth-Century Marriage Plot”

updated: 
Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 12:43pm
2019 Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies (INCS) Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Call for Papers, “Mementos and the Nineteenth-Century Marriage Plot” for “Monuments and Memory,” INCS 2019 (March 21-24, 2019 in Dallas, TX)

Please submit a 250-word abstract by September 5, 2018 to Catherine J. Golden at cgolden@skidmore.edu and Melissa Rampelli at mrampelli@holyfamily.edu

Henry Roth: The Novel at the Periphery

updated: 
Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 9:02am
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

50th NeMLA Anniversary Convention Washington, DC | March 21-24, 2019

Special Issue 'American Literary Naturalism in the World'

updated: 
Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 9:01am
CR: The New Centennial Review (Michigan State UP)
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Essays are invited for a forthcoming special issue of the CR on American literary naturalism in a global context. As Christopher Hill has argued in “The Travels of Naturalism and the Challenges of a World Literary History,” the history of nineteenth-century naturalist fiction points to disorderly patterns of circulation that suggest “multiple, overlapping histories, together forming a heterogeneous history on the scale of the planet.” Using the concept of “travel” as his point of reference, Hill sees naturalism as a paradigm for thinking about transnational literary, cultural, and economic transformations.

Navigating Trauma: Pasts, Presents, and Futures in African American Literature (NeMLA 2019)

updated: 
Sunday, August 5, 2018 - 6:04pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

NeMLA Annual Convention - Washington D.C. - 21-24 March, 2019

In “Further Considerations on Afrofuturism”, Kodwo Eshun argued that the impact of the Middle Passage and slavery could still be felt in African American authorship today. The erasure of their African past, culture and heritage leaving them disconnected and made strangers, black writers look to the future as a way of dealing and engaging with the present. The term counterfutures is thus used to describe those writings that explore the potentiality of a dissonant life that emerges from these traumas, ones which reimagine the futures that the current path of human experience seems to lead to, as well as the pasts that have or might catalyze real or imagined futures.

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