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bibliography and history of the book

Call for Papers: Book History at CEA 2019

updated: 
Wednesday, September 12, 2018 - 10:38am
College English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

Call for Papers, Book History at CEA 2019
March 28-30, 2019 | New Orleans, Louisiana
Astor Crowne Plaza
739 Canal Street, New Orleans, Louisiana 70130 | Phone: (504) 962-0500

The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations on [special topic title] for our 50th annual conference. Submit your proposal at www.cea-web.org

NeMLA 2019: Classical Metanarrative, Aesthetics, and the Creative Process

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:24am
Claire Sommers/The Graduate Center, CUNY & NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018


Ancient Greece and Rome have had a profound influence on subsequent literature. While our analyses of Classical literature, philosophy, and art often focus on the characters and stories they depict, these works often served as a means to examine the aesthetic process itself. One of the earliest surviving Greek texts, Homer’s Iliad, goes so far as to depict its protagonist Achilles singing of ancient heroes and strumming his lyre as a means of determining the effect of being remembered in epic.

NeMLA 2019: Reading and Writing the Classics in Antiquity and Beyond

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:24am
Claire Sommers/The Graduate Center, CUNY & NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

 

The literature of ancient Greece and Rome has survived for thousands of years. As a result, Classical literary and philosophical works have served as a profound influence on the writings of subsequent time periods. Indeed, in many subsequent time periods, the ability to quote from Classical sources became a marker of status and intelligence. However, many works of ancient Greece and Rome are not wholly original, but in fact flaunt their use of source materials, citing earlier versions of myths and epics. Often, Classical and post-Classical authors would modify their source materials, and we are able to see them not only as writers, but as readers in their own right.

CFP: Indigenous Obscenities & National Pornographies Panel @ SHARP 2019

updated: 
Wednesday, August 22, 2018 - 9:09am
Brian Watson
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Call for Papers

Indigenous Obscenities & National Pornographies Panel

SHARP Annual Conference, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA

15 to 19 July 2019

Deadline for CFP: 10-31-2018

 

Richard fitz Nigel’s Dialogue of the Exchequer: Literary, Economic, Political, and Spiritual Approaches

updated: 
Thursday, September 13, 2018 - 12:50pm
Paper Session: 54th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 9-12 May 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

It is hard to exaggerate the novelty of English Treasurer Richard fitz Nigel’s Dialogue of the Exchequer, completed c. 1179. Often considered Europe’s first administrative manual, it required the invention of a new genre, the systematic thinking-through of collected bureaucratic knowledge and its categorization and organization. Successive generations of historians have mined this text for data about England’s taxation office and common law, but it has more to offer researchers of bureaucratic and institutional culture, medieval identity formation, and intertextuality. 

Call for Special Issue Proposals (Open Topic)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:08pm
English Language Notes
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 15, 2018

Call for Special Issue Proposals (Open Topic)

English Language Notes

CFP: Journal of New Librarianship

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:01pm
Journal of New Librarianship
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 31, 2019

The Journal of New Librarianship (newlibs.org) invites submissions from
library scholars, practitioners, and students for its next issue. JNL welcomes
traditional and unestablished forms of scholarly and professional
communication related to any aspect of librarianship. We hope to see a wide
variety of content in terms of scope, length, and format, from lengthy
treatises on intersectionality and library practice, to video projects on the

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