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childrens literature

PAMLA Conference Pasadena, 11/11-13/16: Extended CFP Deadlne 8/5 or ASAP

updated: 
Thursday, July 21, 2016 - 10:32am
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 5, 2016

Approximately thirty sessions for the November 11-13, 2016 Pasadena, California PAMLA Conference are still in need of a paper or two. To propose to one of these open sessions (see a partial list below) go here: http://www.pamla.org/2016/topic-areas . These open sessions will be open until August 5, or the session fills, whichever comes first.

Lifewriting Annual - Call for Book Reviews

updated: 
Friday, July 15, 2016 - 2:56pm
Rob Ward (Brown University)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, December 1, 2016

Lifewriting Annual: Biographical and Autobiographical Studies (AMS Press) seeks reviews of recent publications, including autobiographies, memoirs, letters, and so on. Word length: 1000-1500 words. Citation style: Chicago, 16th edition (author/date). Deadline for submission: December 1st, 2016. Expected publication of volume 6: 2017. Please get in touch with short proposals and questions. 

The Quest for the Real: Nonfiction for Children and Teenagers

updated: 
Friday, July 1, 2016 - 11:52am
Bookbird: Journal of International Children's Literature
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 30, 2017

Bookbird: A Journal of International Children’s Literature invites contributions for a special issue on “nonfiction for children and young adults.” While many children and teenagers prefer to read nonfiction for pleasure (from books of records to military history to sex education) the focus of research and writing about young readers skews extremely heavily towards fiction. Indeed Bookbird itself has not focused on nonfiction since 2003 and no winner or shortlisted candidate for the Hans Christian Andersen writing prize has ever been an author of nonfiction.

“Another Children’s Literature”: Writing by Children and Youth

updated: 
Friday, July 1, 2016 - 11:53am
Bookbird: Journal of International Children's Literature
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 1, 2016

Bookbird: A Journal of International Children’s Literature invites contributions for a special issue on  “another children’s literature”—one created by children and youth themselves. Usually, “children’s literature” has been assumed to be literature written by adults for children. In this issue, however, we intend to focus on literature created by children and youth. While there has been some critical attention to the juvenilia of canonical authors and considerable educational and psychological interest in what children’s writing reveals about children, comparatively little attention has been paid to the literary dimensions of—and theoretical issues raised by—children’s and youths’ writing. 

UPDATE - new deadline - PAMLA 2016 (Nov. 11-13, 2016) in Pasadena, CA

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 12:07pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Languages Association (PAMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 1, 2016

2016 PAMLA Conference Extended Paper Proposal List: Friday, July 1 Deadline

The following sessions are still in search of paper proposals. Sessions may be added to this list over the next few weeks, so do check back regularly. You have until July 1 to propose to any of these sessions.

Go here to submit a paper proposal: http://www.pamla.org/2016/topic-areas

For a list of extended sessions go here: http://www.pamla.org/news/2016/06/18/2016-pamla-conference-extended-pape...

Maps in Popular Fiction

updated: 
Friday, June 24, 2016 - 9:50am
NeMLA 2017 Baltimore
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Maps bound in at the beginning of books can shape the reading of the book in a variety of ways. Whether they map continents and signal the sweeping world building of a high fantasy, or map an idyllic English village and signal a cozy murder mystery, both the scale and content of a map provides important information for a reader of fiction. This panel will consider the questions of genre raised (and perhaps answered) by prefacing fiction with maps, and also the various issues of intertextuality indicated by the presence of the map. For instance, is the map part of the packaging? Is it paratextual? Bound in as a page, does it reify text by providing the semblance of context?

'Reader, I married him!': Investigating 19th-century Readers and Reading the 19th Century

updated: 
Tuesday, June 21, 2016 - 3:46pm
NeMLA 2017
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

NeMLA​( Northeast Modern Language Association​)​​ 48th Annual Convention  ​March 23-26 in Baltimore, Maryland, Session title: 'Reader, I married him!': Investigating 19th-century Readers and Reading the 19th Century As Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre reminds us with her exclamation, “Reader, I married him!,” writers of fiction in the nineteenth century were very aware of their readership with texts. In the increasingly literate century, readers were savvy consumers, rapt fans, and scathing critics. They read penny papers, novels, and genre specific magazines. They read at home, in libraries, and on trains.

Damsels in Redress: Women in Contemporary Fairy-Tale Reimaginings

updated: 
Thursday, June 16, 2016 - 10:37am
Queen's University Belfast
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Call for papers for a conference at Queen’s University Belfast
Damsels in Redress: Women in Contemporary Fairy-Tale Reimaginings
Dates: Friday 7th April and Saturday 8th April 2017
Keynote Speakers: Professor Diane Purkiss (University of Oxford); Dr Amy Davis (University of Hull)

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