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“There are more things in heaven and earth […] ”: Shakespeare’s philosophy, philosophy’s Shakespeare revisited.

updated: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2016 - 11:13am
European Shakespeare Research Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 20, 2017

 

European Shakespeare Research Association

Shakespeare and European Theatrical Cultures:

AnAtomizing Text and Stage

27 – 30 July 2017

University of Gdańsk and

The Gdańsk Shakespeare Theatre, Poland

 

CALL FOR PAPERS:

Seminar title: “There are more things in heaven and earth […][1]: Shakespeare’s philosophy, philosophy’s Shakespeare revisited.

 

Topic and relevance:

CFP 2017 Narrative Conference: "Narratives of Queer Resistance" Panel

updated: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2016 - 11:13am
Claire E. Lenviel/University of Kentucky
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 1, 2016

Call for Panelists -  2017 Narrative Conference

March 23-26, 2017, Lexington, KY

The University of Kentucky will host the Narrative Conference in Lexington, KY from March 23-26, 2017. Keynote speakers include Judith Butler, Kenneth Warren, and Linda Williams.

We seek two panelists to join a panel entitled “Narratives of Queer Resistance.” 

Not Just a Big Fish Story

updated: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2016 - 11:13am
The Atrium: A Journal of Academic Voices/Ivy Tech Community College
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, January 1, 2017

The Atrium: A Journal of Academic Voices

Our spring 2017 CFP Theme:

Not Just a Big Fish Story

CFP: 2016 Siegel McDaniel Award for Graduate Student Research on Philip Roth

updated: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2016 - 11:13am
Philip Roth Society
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 31, 2016

The annual Siegel/McDaniel Award, sponsored by the Philip Roth Society, recognizes high-quality graduate student work written within the past year on any aspect of Philip Roth’s fiction.

We recommend that faculty encourage their students to submit papers, and welcome submissions from Roth Society members and non-members alike.  

Eligible graduate students should submit a clean copy of their 10-15 page essay, double-spaced, in 12 point Times New Roman font to Maggie McKinley, Philip Roth Society Program Chair, at mmckinle@harpercollege.edu.

The deadline is October 31, 2016.

The winner of the Siegel/McDaniel Award receives:

  • a $300 cash award

Call for Abstracts: Edited Collection on Film Festivals

updated: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2016 - 11:13am
Tricia Jenkins, editor
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Call for Abstracts: Edited Collection on Film Festivals

This call for abstracts is for an upcoming book project on film festivals.  The editor is looking for papers on a host of topics from both academics and festival professionals, including but not limited to:

 

Possible Topics:

The role of the FIAPF (International Federation of Film Producers Associations)

The history of European festivals (Berlin, Cannes, Venice, Karlovy Vary etc.)

The history of North American festivals (Toronto, SXSW, Sundance, etc.)

The history of South American, African and/or Asian festivals

The rise of smaller, niche festivals

Hollywood and American War

updated: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2016 - 11:12am
Andrew Rayment / Chiba University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Call for papers

Hollywood and American War (Edited Collection)

Edited by Andrew Rayment and Paul Nadasdy

Contemporary Cinema (Brill) (tentative)

Submission deadline for abstracts (400-600 words): November 1, 2016

rayment13@chiba-u.jp

 

Most men would rather die than think. Many do”. – Bertrand Russell

 

Apocalypse, Dystopia, and Disaster Area

updated: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2016 - 11:12am
Southwest Popular/American Culture Association (SWPACA)
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

 

 

Call for Papers

Apocalypse, Dystopia, and Disaster

Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA)

 

38th Annual Conference, February 15-18, 2017

Hyatt Regency Hotel & Conference Center

Albuquerque, New Mexico

http://www.southwestpca.org

Proposal submission deadline: November 1, 2016

“Law and Literature” – Transcend “Law” and “Literature”

updated: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2016 - 6:44am
Lung-Lung Hu
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 23, 2016

ACLA Conference 2017 Annual Meeting

Date: July 6th-9th, 2017

Place: Utrecht University in Utrecht, the Netherlands

Submission: ACLA website (http://www.acla.org) between September 1 and September 23 

Seminar: “Law and Literature” – Transcend “Law” and “Literature”

Law and Literature as an interdisciplinary research has different focuses in Law and in Comparative Literature.

The Craft (Beer) of Medievalism: Popular Culture, the Middle Ages, and Contemporary Brewing (ICMS Kalamazoo 2017)

updated: 
Monday, August 29, 2016 - 12:00pm
Colby College
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

CFP 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 11–14, 2017), Kalamazoo: The Craft (Beer) of Medievalism: Popular Culture, the Middle Ages, and Contemporary Brewing (A Roundtable) According to the Brewers Association, an industry advocacy group, American craft brewing is a rapidly growing $22.3 billion market. As a visit to any store specializing in small-scale beer will affirm, medieval imagery and ideas are frequently invoked in the marketing and conceptions of such beer. This roundtable will explore the multi-faceted intersection of medievalism and the craft beer movement.

NeMLA 2017 Panel - The Absurd in Literature

updated: 
Monday, August 29, 2016 - 1:38am
Northeast Modern Language Association - Eyal Handelsman
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

NeMLA Annual Convention - Baltimore, MD 23-26 March 2017

 

Death in Supernatural **DEADLINE EXTENDED** [Edited Collection under contract with McFarland Publishers]

updated: 
Sunday, August 28, 2016 - 7:48pm
Mandy Taylor and Susan Nylander
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Project Overview

Editors Taylor and Nylander seek original essays for an edited collection exploring the the nature of death as well as the character Death, the Horseman, in the television show Supernatural.  As death is a constant theme and sometime driver of the show’s narrative, this collection seeks to more fully examine the ways Supernatural represents, personifies, and explores death.   This collection is under contract with McFarland Publishers.

 

Chapters in the proposed collection can focus on one or more of the following categories:

  • Psychological analyses of death, dying, and grief in the series

A Poetics of Emergency

updated: 
Sunday, August 28, 2016 - 9:09am
Melissa Parrish/Rutgers University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 22, 2016

The present moment of history is a difficult one to write, particularly for a growing body of North American poets with an increasingly urgent political focus. History, for these poets, consists of a complicated range of catastrophic events in the making, as the convergence of institutional racism, uneven development, and ecological degradation set the conditions for pervasive sense of crisis. The present therefore demands political engagement from a number of angles—racial, economic, ecological, to name a few—at once. The contingencies of the present as a temporal category, more generally, recall the boundary-crossing potential of event-making on the move—history “in solution,” as Raymond Williams put it.

Poetic Thinking (ACLA 2017)

updated: 
Saturday, August 27, 2016 - 1:23pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 23, 2016

Contemporary poets like J. H. Prynne, Denise Riley, and John Wilkinson have explored the nature and scope of an alternative mode of ‘thinking’ in poetry. Aided by late modernist reformulations of poetic difficulty, these poets continue the Romantic legacy by reconfiguring poetry as essentially theoretical. For the Cambridge school, ‘poetic thinking’ does not involve a simple rehashing of philosophical ideas in poetic diction, but as Simon Jarvis points out, these poems instead of accommodating philosophy within their formal structures are in themselves philosophic. Such a reconsideration of the poem as a cognitive product affords a metaphysical truth that is at once noble and transcendent.

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