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classical studies

“Complexities, Appeals, and Paradoxes of Language” International Conference

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:12pm
London Centre for Interdisciplinary Research
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 31, 2018

Those scholars committed to an inter-disciplinary perspective on human experiences confront centuries-old divisions between and among the natural sciences, social sciences and the humanities, competing investigative methods, descriptive foci, and explanatory emphases. Bolstered by specialization, administrative demarcations, professionalization, and expertise, the discontinuities generate trajectories of intellectual enrichment and progress.  On the other hand, have scholars within these intellectual spheres, disciplines, and area studies become passing ships in the night?  What would constitute evidence of this condition, if this is, indeed, the case? Have scholars not been displaced from public discourse and social media?

Afterlives of The Odyssey

updated: 
Tuesday, July 31, 2018 - 10:16am
Jacob Jewusiak
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 10, 2018

Call for Papers, “Afterlives of The Odyssey” for the MLA International Symposium (23-25 July 2019 in Lisbon, Portugal)

Kalamazoo 2019: Beyond the Battlefield: Medieval Literature in Wartime

updated: 
Wednesday, July 25, 2018 - 9:03am
Daniel Davies (University of Pennsylvania) and Max Ashton (Stanford University)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

How does medieval war resonate beyond the battlefield? This roundtable session invites papers that consider the relationship between medieval literature and wartime. War punctuates our understanding of the Middle Ages, providing us with frameworks for comprehending and interpreting the events of history, and the corpus of literature created in response to these conditions is equally broad. In its most literal sense, wartime literature is the narration or memorialization of events on the battlefield, from the Battle of Maldon to the work of Jordan Fantosme and the poetry attributed to Laurence Minot. Wartime, however, is less a temporal or veridical marker than a loaded conceptual term. What counts as wartime? When does it begin and end?

Poetics and Politics of Translation and Rewriting in Early Modern Literature in English (Northeast Modern Language Association 50th Anniversary Convention)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 9:48am
Emiliano Gutierrez Popoca/ Brandeis University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The achievements of Early Modern literature in English evince the relevance of translation for literary history. The impact of translation on the development of new literary modes and genres during this period is often acknowledged. It is clear, for instance, that the sonnet in English, both as a verse form and as a mode of individual lyrical expression, is traced to its introduction to the English tradition through Wyatt and Surrey’s translations of Petrarch’s Canzoniere.

REMINDER: Bridging the Gap? Digital Media in the Humanities Classroom (special issue of Interdisciplinary Humanities)

updated: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018 - 11:12am
Cameron McFarlane and Kristin Lucas, Nipissing University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, January 1, 2019

Recent critical focus on media and technology maps efforts to create a dynamic classroom that at its best enriches the teaching and learning at the university. But the long-standing interest in media as a means to reach students and enhance delivery also points to an absence in current scholarship, which has not been attentive to that same media as content in the humanities classroom.

 

Seeing the (Im)Material: Visual Detail, Abstraction, and Artifice in Medieval Texts

updated: 
Monday, July 16, 2018 - 9:34am
50th Anniversary Northeast Modern Language Association Convention, to be held in Washington, D.C., from March 21st through the 24th, 2019.
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The literature produced by the communities of early Northern Europe, where the elements of craft and material culture informed the descriptive matter of both poetry and prose, has left a legacy which demands critical analysis of the ways in which the trappings of the real and the imaginary were represented.  What were the relationships between figurative language, mimetic representation, the production of craft, and perceptions shaped by the visual arts?  Did the allegories, symbols, emblems, fancies, and verisimilitude of literature in Old and Middle English, Old Norse/Icelandic, Early Welsh, or Early Irish provide opportunities to discuss the interface of descriptive writing with other modes of representation?  Potential papers are asked to cons

What Is Dead May Never Die: Italian Revivals of the Tragic (NeMLA 2019)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 10, 2018 - 10:34am
Victoria Fanti
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

In today’s mass media landscape, reports of domestic tragedies, inexplicable violence, and familial collapse have become staples of the 24-hour news cycle. Meanwhile, television series like Game of Thrones (Il Trono di Spade) and soap operas like The Bold and the Beautiful (Beautiful) sensationalize transgressions like parricide, incest, and tyrannical impulses to massive global success.

Rewriting and Adapting Classical Women in the Italian Renaissance (RSA 2019)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 10, 2018 - 10:41am
Victoria Fanti
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 25, 2018

From compendia of “illustrious women” modelled on Boccaccio’s De mulieribus claris, to Machiavelli’s Lucrezia in the Mandragola, to Giambattista Gelli’s (male-driven) philosophical dialogue La Circe, women from the classical tradition are resurrected in many forms and to many ends over the course of the Italian Renaissance. This panel seeks to investigate how authors and intellectuals rewrote, revised, and (in some cases) reclaimed classical women in Renaissance Italian discourse and literature. 

Topics, authors, and questions that papers might address include, but are not limited to:

Free Will and the Subjective Agency of Women in Dante's Commedia

updated: 
Thursday, July 5, 2018 - 11:42am
NeMLA 2019, Washington DC
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Free Will, defined by Dante's Virgilio as the noble power to guide and constrain the soul's natural inclination and desires (Purg 18.73),  holds a place of central concern in the Commedia. Elaborating on Marco Lombardo's discourse, the roman poet asserts that it is Free Will that accounts for the justice in feeling joy for doing good and misery for doing ill. While offering a general outline of the fundamental importance of Free Will in the ethical and moral rationale for the fate of departed souls, the pilgrim's first guide promises that Beatrice will provide clarity on this and other topics of particular complexity beyond the purview of his Classical pagan understanding.

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