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classical studies

Remixing Critical Theory: Literacy Theory as Literary Criticism; 4Cs / CCCC 2010 Panel; 4/22

Friday, April 10, 2009 - 3:20pm
Nicole duPlessis / Texas A&M University

Eldred and Mortensen, in their article "Reading Literacy Narratives" published in College English (1992), call for the movement of literacy studies "in one important direction: into the study of literary texts" (512). Toward this goal, the article identifies categories of literacy-centered literary texts: the "literacy myth," "narratives of socialization," "literature of the contact zone," and "literacy narratives" (Eldred and Mortensen 512-513). However, to date, this article has failed to make a significant impact on literary criticism.

Women Readers/Educational Texts 1500-1800

Friday, April 10, 2009 - 1:58pm
Dr Pollie Bromilow University of Liverpool

First Call for Papers

Women Readers/Educational Texts 1500-1800

A three-day international conference at the University of Liverpool
April 14th-16th 2010

Re(Viewing) the Landscape of Visual Rhetoric: Topics in Visual Rhetoric; SAMLA Conf. Nov 6-8, 2009; Abstracts Due May 31, 2009

Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 11:52am
Mary Hocks, English Dept, Georgia State University

The SAMLA special session on visual rhetoric welcomes paper, panel, and performance proposals on topics that deal with all aspects of visual rhetoric, such as visual culture and the Web; teaching visual rhetoric in the classroom; image use in blogs; exploring identities with visual rhetoric; visual rhetoric in student writing; (re)presentations of the body; visual rhetoric in politics; visual rhetoric of physical spaces; visual rhetoric and environmental issues; and other relevant topics.

"The Future ain't what it used to be" - PROPOSALS: MAY 15th 2009 / CONFERENCE: 17th JUNE 2009

Wednesday, April 8, 2009 - 1:05pm
The Future ain't what it used to be: Interactions of Past, Present and Future in Literature and Visual Media - Postgraduate Conference

"The Future ain't what it used to be" is the seventh annual Postgraduate Conference held by the English Programme, University of Dundee. It will investigate questions such as: how have perspectives of the future changed over time, how is the future perceived in literature and the media today, and how do representations of the past help us to imagine the future? Proposals should be 300 words long, for papers lasting 20 minutes. The deadline for proposals is 15th May 2009.

For more information contact Laura Findlay (, or go to

CFP: Translation, Performance and Reception of Greek Drama, 1900-1950: International Dialogues. Comparative Drama Special Issue

Tuesday, April 7, 2009 - 1:36pm
Amanda Wrigley

Proposals are invited for essays on the translation, performance and reception of ancient Greek drama in the period between and around the two world wars—so, very broadly speaking 1900-1950.

Essays which have an international focus or dimension are particularly encouraged: for example, discussions of translations and adaptations which engage with international politics; considerations of intercontinental trends in Greek play performance; or essays on the various receptions of internationally touring productions (such as Max Reinhardt's Oedipus, 1910-12, Harley Granville-Barker and Lillah McCarthy's Amercian tour of Trojan Women and Iphigenia in Tauris, 1915).

Semiotics of Revelation

Monday, April 6, 2009 - 12:41pm
International Association for Semiotic Studies

The roundtable will focus on the semiotic implications of the idea of revelation. What are the characteristics of meaning that is produced, communicated, and received as "revealed"? Are there anthropological, or even bio-logical constants in such characteristics, or do they rather vary according to socio-cultural contexts and historical époques? What terms express the idea of revelation in the different natural languages, and with which semantic connotations? What values are attributed to the idea of a revelation of meaning, and what, on the contrary, to a meaning that is non-revealed? What relations of rupture, or tension, obtain between these different valorizations? Through what narratives is the idea of a revealed meaning elaborated?

International Multidisciplinary Women's Congress (October 13-16, 2009)

Sunday, April 5, 2009 - 3:10pm
Dokuz Eylul University, Faculty of Arts & Sciences, Izmir, TURKEY

Please, note that abstracts of 300 words will be submitted electronically at our website at Deadline for submission of proposals is June 1, 2009.

The IMWC will take place at the Dokuz Eylul University in Turkey between October 13th and 16th, 2009 and the overarching theme for the Congress will be "Change and Empowerment."

The aim of the Congress is to foster communication and collaboration between academicians and to open up a discussion platform for the analysis, development, and exchange of ideas on the following Women-related main topics:

The Artfulness of Play: Bridging Creative and Theoretical Discourses (Sept 25 - 27, 2009)

Friday, April 3, 2009 - 12:28pm
University of Western Ontario, Centre for the Study of Theory and Criticism

Children, athletes, actors, and musicians all play. Can academics play too? What do we play? Numerous currents of contemporary thought, from Wittgenstein to Baudrillard and Derrida, highlight play as a site worthy of inquiry. However, play does not (cannot?) have a precise sense or definition, and therefore our aim will be to put ideas into play, to play with them.

Graduate students and artists are invited to participate in an interdisciplinary conference regarding the concept of play. Academic papers, artwork (visual and performance), and film (short and feature length) are welcome.

SAMLA 2009 Session: Teaching Language and Literature

Thursday, April 2, 2009 - 12:37pm
Rachel Luria/ SAMLA

Session Title: Teaching Language and Literature
Open Topic

We welcome papers that deal with any and all issues related to the teaching of language and literature. Proposals may be related to issues such as the language of gender, comics as literature, or teaching new media, but this is not required. Send your inspiring ideas!

By May 1st, please submit proposals of no more than 150 words by email – preferred – to or by post to University of South Carolina, Arts Institute, Attention: Rachel Luria, 1212 Greene Street/228 Sumwalt, Columbia, SC 29208