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Thoreau from across the pond

updated: 
Friday, June 3, 2016 - 9:41am
full name / name of organization: 
Julien Nègre / ENS de Lyon, France
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

International Symposium

October 19-20, 2017

École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France)

 

Thoreau from across the pond

 

Organized by Julien Nègre (ENS de Lyon)

François Specq (ENS de Lyon)

and Laura Dassow Walls (University of Notre Dame)

 

2001: A Space Odyssey: Representation and Interpretation

updated: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 2:40pm
full name / name of organization: 
Independent
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 30, 2016

2001: A Space Odyssey
Representation and Interpretation

Chapters are sought for an edited collection on 2001: A Space Odyssey, with post-graduates and ECRs in particular encouraged to submit.

Kubrick Studies in recent years has come to be dominated by historical approaches, informed largely by the Stanley Kubrick Archive. Though these new methodologies have progressed our understanding of Kubrick’s operations as a film director, it does not resolve the intellectual, formal and aesthetic motivations that underpin his work.

CFP Abstracts: TV Network Execs, Producers, and Performers: Clashes over Television

updated: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 12:52pm
full name / name of organization: 
David Pierson/2016 History and Film Conference
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 15, 2016

From imperious TV network executives to “golden gut” programmers, star performers, influential independent producers, broadcast and cable TV mavericks, and auteurist showrunners—all of these individuals have struggled to leave their mark on mainstream and alternative television. From the early pioneering days of network television in the 1940s to the present-day hypercompetitive, multiplatform TV program milieu, these figures have strived to interpret and comprehend public taste in order to produce and distribute programming that satisfies a wide range of audiences, advertisers, and subscribers. 

 

CFP NeMLA 2017: "Queer and Now": Queerness in the Mainstream

updated: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 12:07pm
full name / name of organization: 
North East Modern Language Association
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

On or about June 26, 2015, human character changed. As late as 1991, Eve Sedgwick observed that being queer at that time still meant being someone whose life did not matter and whose very survival was highly uncertain (“Queer and Now”). Yet, our contemporary “now” is a moment which has seen same sex marriage declared a federal right; openly queer persons appear as comedians, TV reporters and characters on shows, in films and recently on the musical stage. No longer “apparitional” in Terry Castle’s well-known sense, queers of the current moment might not be confined to haunting the margins of the social imaginary.

Reimagining Beauty and the Beast

updated: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 12:07pm
full name / name of organization: 
Miguel Gaggiotti
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, June 15, 2016

 

Call for Papers

 

Reimagining Beauty and the Beast

One-day Interdisciplinary Conference

 

University of Bristol

7th September 2016

 

Keynote speakers

Dr. Amy Davis, University of Hull

Prof. James Williams, Royal Holloway University of London

 

Updated CFP--The American Graphic Short Story--A Symposium of the American Literature Association

updated: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 12:07pm
full name / name of organization: 
Society for the Study of the American Short Story
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 1, 2016

The Society for the Study of the American Short Story seeks papers for a panel on the American graphic short story to be held at an international symposium on the short story. The conference will convene in Savannah, October 20-22, 2016, at the Hyatt Hotel.

Watchung Review Call for Articles

updated: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 12:06pm
full name / name of organization: 
Watchung Review
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, July 31, 2016

Watchung Review invites scholarly papers on the theme of migrations and identity. This is a timely topic, both in academic work and in the media, and one which calls on the rich work of postcoloniality, movement and migration in literature, rhetoric, and interdisciplinary studies on migration and identity.  We encourage submissions which approach these deeply political issues head on, and also papers which interpret the theme more broadly by investigating issues of migration arising in a variety of periods, intellectual spaces and through a range of critical and theoretical lenses.

Topics of interest may include but are not limited to:

Going Back to Roots: Revisiting the Groundbreaking Miniseries

updated: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 12:06pm
full name / name of organization: 
NeMLA
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

The broadcast of the miniseries adaptation of Alex Haley’s Roots, which aired in January of 1977, became a ratings bonanza, a cultural touchstone, and a defining moment in the representation of African Americans in popular media. 40 years later, the impact of Alex Haley’s novel and the ABC miniseries continues to be felt, most notably in the recent History Channel “reboot” of the miniseries, but also in less obvious but more profound ways.

The Sermon as Literature

updated: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 12:06pm
full name / name of organization: 
Dr. Mark K. Fulk, Panel Organizer/
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 20, 2016

This panel seeks informed readings of British sermons written between 1500 and 1900, reflecting on the ways that the sermon fits in the literature classroom and for literature readers today.What new avenues of research can be pursued in studying the sermon in Great Britain's literature from 1500-1900? How do the well-known sermon writers (e.g., Donne, Andrewes, Wesley) and lesser-known (Barrow, Whitefield, Edwards) form, transform, and deform the genre? And how do we respond to the form as instructors of British literature in the post-Christian, twenty-first century? This panel seeks informed readings of sermons and ability to discuss them in their historical context as well as pedagogically for college/university classrooms today.

Literary Totalities

updated: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 12:06pm
full name / name of organization: 
Kurt Cavender, Brandeis University
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

One legacy of literary studies’ long love affair with post-structuralism has been a continuing reluctance to engage the concept of totality except in order to contest or deconstruct it. Two exceptions that prove this general trend are capitalism and ecology, and one could argue that it is precisely because both are still arguably acceptable as totalizing concepts that they continue to serve as productive sites of inquiry. Beyond these two instances, however, totality seems to have gone the way of closely related relics of Western metaphysics such as universality, objectivity, and the absolute: a conceptual category to be taken seriously only by the naive, dogmatic, or otherwise insufficiently critical reader.

UPDATE: World Literature – Northeast Popular/American Culture Association

updated: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 12:06pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Popular/American Culture Association
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, June 15, 2016

The World Literature area for the 2016 Northeast Popular/American Culture Association conference is accepting paper proposals from faculty and graduate students. NEPCA’s 2016 annual conference will be held from October 21-22, 2016 at Keene State College in Keene, NH.

CFP: Virginia Woolf Miscellany special topics issue: Virginia Woolf and Indigenous Literatures

updated: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 12:06pm
full name / name of organization: 
International Virginia Woolf Society
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 31, 2017

CFP: Virginia Woolf Miscellany special topics issue: Virginia Woolf and Indigenous Literatures This issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany seeks essays that consider Woolf’s oeuvre in dialogue with works by Native American, First Nations, Australian, and New Zealander authors, among others. What kind of dialogic emerges when placing Woolf’s writings alongside those of indigenous writers? How might indigenous literatures enhance interpretations of Woolf’s modernist, feminist, and pacifist poetics? How might such comparisons affect or inform understandings of subjectivity in women’s lives and literature, and the interconnections between narrative innovation and socio-political activism?

[UPDATE - Deadline Extended] Chapter Proposals For the book "Ideological Messaging and the Role of Political Literature"

updated: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 11:56am
full name / name of organization: 
Önder Çakırtaş-IGI Global- http://www.igi-global.com/publish/call-for-papers/call-details/2166
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 30, 2016

http://www.igi-global.com/publish/call-for-papers/call-details/2166

This book project tries to produce an outline for the diversification of literature and political writings. The book covers many disciplines ranging from political literature, gender politics, identity politics, minority politics, to ideologized writing, censorship, rhetoric and aestheticism of politics, and gendered literature.

Queer and Feminist Afrofutures (Panel)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 1, 2016 - 11:50am
full name / name of organization: 
NeMLA
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Concerns about futurity have long been at the center of queer and African studies. While the anti-relational turn in queer theory has celebrated a politics of failure, disrupting the idea of progressive futurity, African decolonization is understandably wedded to visions of a future unfettered by the past. This is not to say that the “no future” brand of queer studies is any less interested in futurity than are African nationalist discourses, but that this radical negativity is made possible by certain kinds of economic privilege. At the same time, science and speculative fiction offer African writers a tool to envision alternative futures set temporally beyond forms of social injustice that continue to exist in the present.

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