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Austen and Deleuze

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 2:28pm
full name / name of organization: 
Rhizomes: Cultural Studies in Emerging Knowledge
contact email: 

2017 is the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen's death. Austen has become one of the most discussed and beloved literary figures; indeed, her status as one of our most beloved literary figures has often influenced the ways in which her life and works are discussed within critical circles. Eve Sedgwick famously announced that Austen criticism is "notable not just for its timidity and banality but for its unresting exaction of the spectacle of a Girl Being Taught a Lesson." This special issue of Rhizomes invites critical articles and creative works that dismiss both this legacy of timidity and the tendency to exact pedagogical spectacles through scholarship.

The Female Science Fiction Western (Abstracts due June 20; collection of essays)

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 1:47pm
full name / name of organization: 
Melanie A. Marotta / Kolin Ford

We are seeking original, previously unpublished essays for a collection tentatively titled The Science Fiction Western: Representation of Female Characters in the Late Twentieth and Twenty-first Century Media. In reference to historians' accounts of the frontier, Susan Armitage writes that "Women are either absent or incidental to the story". While women may have been attracted to the Frontier Myth concept, they are infrequently the main focus of American Western stories. Adult males, however, appeared prominently within literature in connection to this myth.

Recuperation (of antagonistic, oppositional or emancipatory Forms of Cultural Production)

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 1:42pm
full name / name of organization: 
London Conference in Critical Thought
contact email: 

Recuperation is an inexorable feature of late capitalism, as modes of art and cultural expression that once were resistant, oppositional or antagonistic from the 1960's and 70's have been gradually absorbed by
capitalism and its attendant apparatus, such that a certain generation has no idea what even constitutes "political dissent" because they have never seen examples of it. Land art which once rejected the

[REMINDER] CFP for Proposed Panel: Medievalism in Children's and Young Adult Literature – TEMA September 23-25, 2016 Texas A&M U

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 12:24pm
full name / name of organization: 
Texas Medieval Association
contact email: 

Panel co-chairs: Melissa Filbeck and Michaela Baca, Texas A&M University

Something about our medieval past continues to fascinate contemporary readers, including a readership most often associated with all that is shiny and new: children and young adults. For this panel, which will be proposed for the 2016 Texas Medieval Association (TEMA) conference, we seek papers that focus on the medieval in texts for young audiences. Some possible areas for exploration include:

•Children's/YA adaptations of medieval texts (including books, television, and film)

•Medieval motifs in contemporary children's or YA literature or film

•The function of medievalism in children's/YA texts

[UPDATE] Borders and Borderlands: Liminal Textualities in Contemporary Literature

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 10:26am
full name / name of organization: 
York St John University

Borderlands are defined as being both 'an area of land close to a border between two countries' and 'an area between two qualities, ideas or subjects that has features of both but is not clearly one or the other' (Oxford Dictionaries, 2016). The significance of borders and borderlands has become particularly prevalent in contemporary society. Literature has always responded to the issues of its context of production such as Burke writing on the French Revolution up to and including Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche's 2013 novel Americanah addressing global concerns of nationality and migration.

Reminder: EXTENDING PLAY 3 abstracts due April 3

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 9:49am
full name / name of organization: 
Extending Play 3: Temporalities of Play
contact email: 

Reminder to get your abstracts in for Extending Play 3: Temporalities of Play

School of Communication & Information
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ
Sept. 30 & Oct. 1, 2016

Proposals Due: April 3rd (Abstracts, 250 words)

Extending Play is back, and this iteration will play with the concept of time. We are looking for papers and presentations that excavate the past, interpret the present, and forecast the future of play and games.

Reminder: Reassessing Women's Writing of the 1880s and 1890s 25-26 July 2016

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 5:07am
full name / name of organization: 
International Centre for Victorian Women Writers, Canterbury Christ Church University, UK
contact email: 

From Brontë to Bloomsbury Third International Conference:
Reassessing Women's Writing of the 1880s and 1890s
25-26 July 2016
Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, UK
Confirmed keynote speakers: Professor Ann Heilmann (University of Cardiff) and Dr Catherine Pope (Victorian Secrets)

Afro-Mexico: Negotiating a Cultural Identity through Dance

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 3:47am
full name / name of organization: 
Joana A. Guzman
contact email: 

This research looks at the cultural performances and popular celebrations practiced by Afro-Mexicans from the colonial period to the 20th century in the regions of Veracruz, Oaxaca and Guerrero. The goal is to demonstrate how the use of performance and popular traditions has impacted Afro-Mexicans in the shaping of an imagined community, giving space for agency in the formation of their cultural identity. The scholarship of the African diaspora in Mexico is a relatively fresh area of study. Gonzalo Aguirre Beltran (1945) pioneered the documentation of their economic history including slavery and origins. Other themes of study rely on sociopolitical aspects, geographic studies, gender, magic and spirituality.

(Update) Call for Abstracts for Critical Insights: Civil Rights

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 3:22am
full name / name of organization: 
Christopher Allen Varlack (University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
contact email: 

From its flawed notion of "separate but equal" to the rampant violence against black bodies throughout the twentieth century, the United States faced a clear racial divide perpetuated by its Jim Crow culture and the disenfranchisement of blacks. In response, on August 28, 1963, noted American civil rights activist, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered his iconic "I Have a Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, urging radical social and political change in a society marred by a rich history of segregation and discrimination. Since then, we have recognized this speech as a symbol of the enduring struggle for equal civil rights and the pursuit of the core values upon which the United States was based.

Interdisciplinary and Transnational Volume on Vegetarianism, Proposals due May 30, 2016

updated: 
Wednesday, March 23, 2016 - 9:04pm
full name / name of organization: 
Adam Shprintzen
contact email: 

Chapter proposals are invited for a new interdisciplinary and transnational volume focusing on the social and cultural contexts of vegetarianism throughout history. This volume will represent the first scholarly collection of essays that critically considers vegetarianism as both a worldwide phenomena and an aspect of the longue durée of history, and seeks to explain vegetarianism as a global, social, and historical continuity. Taken as a whole, the essays will provide an answer as to how and why vegetarianism has been a constant throughout human history despite continuous social challenges.

Arab-American Culture in the United States

updated: 
Wednesday, March 23, 2016 - 8:23pm
full name / name of organization: 
Stacy E. Holden, Midwest Popular Culture Conference
contact email: 

2016 Midwest Popular Culture Association Conference/Midwest American Culture Association

Thursday-Sunday, October 6-9, 2016

Chicago, IL

Hilton Rosemont Chicago

Deadline: April 30, 2016

Submissions.mpcaaca.org

The Midwest Popular Culture Association / American Culture Association is a regional branch of the Popular Culture Association / American Culture Association. It holds an annual conference in a Midwestern City. This conference is organized according to principal Areas of Popular Culture in the United States, including the Middle East and North Africa. As the Area Chair, I invite submissions of abstracts for a panel addressing "Arab-American Culture in the United States."

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