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Borders of Modernism Perugia 14-16 December 2016

updated: 
Friday, March 18, 2016 - 1:29pm
full name / name of organization: 
CEMS Centre for European Modernism Studies (http://www.cemstudies.eu)
contact email: 

Originally deriving from the Old French bordure (meaning "seam" and "edge of a shield"), in its geopolitical sense the term "border" was first used in Scotland in the 1530s. The Borders was indeed the name of the district adjoining the English boundary. Accordingly, over the centuries borders have been used to signal differences, separations, distinctions, discontinuities, the beginning of the other, as well as the need for protection and preservation. One could mention cultural, linguistic, political, social, gender borders, and the list could of course be much longer.

Authors Sought for Edited Collection (under contract) on PTSD and Eastwood films

updated: 
Friday, March 18, 2016 - 1:25pm
full name / name of organization: 
Allen Redmon and Charles Hamilton, Texas A&M University-Central Texas
contact email: 

With the release of American Sniper (2014), Clint Eastwood brought to the surface an interest in post-traumatic stress disorder that runs throughout his directorial career. Early feature length films like Play Misty for Me (1971) and The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) represent versions of post-traumatic stress before the concept was officially listed in the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM). Firefox (1982) appears just two years after that same group entered the term into the third edition of the DSM as a response to the increased number of soldiers seeking help for psychological issues related to wartime experiences.

18th Annual British Graduate Shakespeare Conference, 2 - 4 June 2016

updated: 
Friday, March 18, 2016 - 11:51am
full name / name of organization: 
British Graduate Shakespeare Conference

Please share the following CfP with any graduate students who may be interested. Deadline for Paper Proposals: 23:59 GMT on Monday 21 March 2016.

________________________________________________________________
BritGrad 2016: Call for Papers

2-4 June 2016

The Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham

We invite graduate students with interests in Shakespeare, Renaissance, and Early Modern Studies to submit paper proposals for the Eighteenth Annual British Graduate Shakespeare Conference.

Literature's Animals Postgraduate Conference 18th May 2016

updated: 
Friday, March 18, 2016 - 7:26am
full name / name of organization: 
University of Bristol Department of English

Call for Papers
Literature's Animals Postgraduate Conference

As part of a two-week series of events on the subject of animal studies, Bristol University's Department of English is organising a postgraduate conference.

[UPDATE] Pop Culture panel at MMLA 2016 Nov 10-13

updated: 
Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 8:39pm
full name / name of organization: 
Midwest Modern Language Association

In the spirit of this year's conference theme of "Border States," we welcome papers that explore borders in all their diverse forms in popular culture. Popular culture by nature transgresses both literal and figurative borders by creating liminal spaces for new ideas and pushing the boundaries of perception. Possible topics include media and adaptation, virtual reality, immersion and interactivity, posthumanism in pop culture, border crossing in graphic narratives, and fanfiction. We welcome papers that discuss all forms of popular media including, but not limited to, film, television, popular literature, graphic novels/manga, visual art, video games, and music.

Pacific Coast Philology: Essay Submissions Welcome

updated: 
Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 7:48pm
full name / name of organization: 
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association

Pacific Coast Philology, the journal of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA), publishes peer-reviewed essays of interest to scholars in the classical and modern languages, literatures, and cultures. We publish two annual issues. The regular issue contains articles (5000-8000 words) and book reviews. The next regular issue will appear in early spring 2017. The editor, Roswitha Burwick (rburwick@scrippscollege.edu), invites you to submit your articles for consideration. Since readers normally take 3-6 months to assess your work, we recommend that you submit your work now so that we can include your essays and book reviews in the 2017 regular issue.

Update: Deadline Extended for the 63rd Annual Meeting of the Midwest Conference on British Studies, Sept 16-18, 2016

updated: 
Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 7:25pm
full name / name of organization: 
Midwest Conference on British Studies

The abstract submission deadline for the 63rd annual meeting of the Midwest Conference on British Studies has been extended to April 4, 2016. This year's meeting will be hosted by Iowa State University in Ames, September 16-18, 2016. The keynote speaker will be Susan Kingsley Kent of University of Colorado Boulder, and the plenary address will be given by Ian Archer of the University of Oxford.

The MWCBS Program Committee will consider individual abstracts as well as proposals for complete sessions (of three participants) and roundtables (of four participants). Graduate students are encouraged to submit abstracts and are invited to apply for travel funds to the conference and for graduate paper prizes for presentations given at the meeting.

CFP--Colorado Critical Review--Abstracts Due April 15th

updated: 
Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 6:03pm
full name / name of organization: 
Colorado Critical Review--Hosted at the University of Colorado Denver

www.ColoradoCriticalReview.com

Call for Submissions, Inaugural Issue 1.1

Abstracts due (250 word max): April 15, 2016.
Invitations to submit will be sent out by: April 30, 2016.
Completed submissions due: June 30, 2016.
Abstract submissions at: http://www.coloradocriticalreview.com/submit/

Native American Literature at Midwest MLA 11/10 - 11/13

updated: 
Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 3:52pm
full name / name of organization: 
MMLA Permanent Section on Native American Literature
contact email: 

Proposals for papers examining the conference theme of "Border States" in the works of Native American authors, accepted for the MMLA convention in St. Louis. Possible topics may explore literary treatments of physical and cultural migrations; geographic and textual contact zones; legal divisions; assimilations and blendings; genre borders or intersections of oral and written literatures; or generational, environmental, regional, transnational, linguistic, or textual borders. Please send proposals of 200-300 words by April 10 - Convention website: http://www.luc.edu/mmla/convention/

MMLA American Literature 1 Panel

updated: 
Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 3:04pm
full name / name of organization: 
Shawna Rushford-Spence/ MMLA

With the theme of "Border States" in mind, we welcome papers exploring the intersections between stubborn divisions and promising coalitions across lines of race, class, region, and nation in American literary texts produced before 1870. Possible topics might include: representations of border-crossing, migration and mobility, and/or troubled immigration; explorations of the cultural effects of urbanization and suburbanization, expansion, and/or technological innovation; the influence of literary texts on the cultural imagination and/or states of being and mind; the influence of "progress" on the literary imagination; and migrants and/or immigrants as characters in literary texts.

Keats in Popular Culture (Abstracts Due: June 15, 2016)

updated: 
Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 1:15pm
full name / name of organization: 
Brian Bates/Cal Poly State University, San Luis Obispo
contact email: 

Abstracts are invited for an essay collection, Keats in Popular Culture.

Although Keats's literary legacy and influence on Victorian, Modernist and Post-Modernist literature has been explored in some depth, his impact on popular culture—particularly in the 21st century—has yet to be fleshed out. This collection seeks essays that examine Keats's significant presence in film, television, music, comics, video games, memes, science fiction, architecture and design, matters of taste, cultural criticism, popular science, psychology and philosophy.

Interested parties, please send 500-word abstracts by June 15, 2016 to Brian Bates at brbates@calpoly.edu.

EXTENDED DEADLINE: CFP for Edited Collection: New Readings of the Medieval Robin Hood Tales

updated: 
Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 10:40am
full name / name of organization: 
Mikee Delony, PhD and Perry Neil Harrison
contact email: 

The 2013 publication of Thomas Ohlgren and Lister Matheson's Early Rymes of Robyn Hood: An Edition of the Texts, ca. 1425-1600 provides new opportunities for scholars to reread and reconsider the earliest Robin Hood rhymes and plays. Scholars now have access to the extant manuscripts of the late medieval ballads as well as two early plays. Now that these early texts are readily available—some for the first time—it is time for scholars of a wide range of interests and backgrounds to return to the medieval rhymes with the aid of this significant new resource that allows for truly in-depth analysis of the source materials.

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