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Call for papers - TheatreForum

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:08am
TheatreForum: International Theatre Journal
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

TheatreForum: International Theatre Journal, dedicated to documenting, discussing, and disseminating innovative and provocative theatrework is soliciting articles and playscripts for its upcoming issues to be published in December 2016 and June 2017.

ARTICLES
Articles focus on performance and process. They are on an innovative company, production, or creators, but others subjects are possible. Articles on work produced internationally are encouraged. ~5,000 words and including high quality color photographs

[UPDATE] PAMLA 2016: American Queerness after 1945- Due 6/10/16

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:08am
Grant Palmer/Pacific Ancient and Modern Langauge Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 10, 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS
American Queerness after 1945
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association
114th Annual Conference
November 11-13, 2016
Pasadena, California

What new valences of power and politics have arisen in queer literature since the Lavender Scare? What are the consequences of rendering the private as public? What are its legacies for the contemporary? This panel welcomes a broad range of approaches to these topics within American Literature since 1945.

Transmitting and Translating the Eighteenth Century to the Twenty-First Century Classroom

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:08am
NEASECS 2016
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 13, 2016

Transmitting and Translating the 18th Century to the 21st-Century Classroom 

It has been nearly twenty years since Neil Postman published his Building a Bridge to the Eighteenth Century. In this book, Postman compellingly discusses why it was becoming increasingly important for turn-of-the-century individuals to read writers like Voltaire, Diderot, and Johnson. It’s often a model for how we can look at eighteenth-century literature and philosophy through the lens of modern events.

Call for Panel Themes

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:07am
Sewanee Medieval Colloquium
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 29, 2016

The Forty-Third Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium

March 10-11, 2017

The University of the South, Sewanee, TN

 

General Theme: Borders and Margins

True Crime Fictions

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:06am
Dr Mark Blacklock, Birkbeck College
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 27, 2016

We invite proposals for papers for True Crime Fictions, to be held on Friday 1st July 2016.

SLSA 2016 Panel: Science Fiction Fools

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:33am
Laura Richardson
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, May 14, 2016

Science Fiction Fools

SLSA Panel

 

As much as the genre is concerned with portraying brilliant, often mad, scientists modeled on the cultural capital of Einstein’s celebrity, science fiction has a nearly equal investment in the character of the fool. C-3PO, Bill and Ted, Verence (Pratchett), and Merry and Pippin, for example, function as much more than foils to main characters; their bumbling and clever idiocies are mainstays for the genre. What is the nature of the sustained relationship between science fiction and fools? How does the genre adapt this archetype, or how has the role of the fool changed the genre? What is the connection between science/technology and idiocy?

 

"The Female Body in the Public Realm: Territory for Political and Religious Wars"

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:32am
NeMLA 2017 Annual Convention, Baltimore, March 23-26, 2017 (Johns Hopkins University)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

As globalization settles in across the planet, the female body continues to be the territory par excellence where political and religious wars resiliently take place. From the Balkan war, to the femicides of Ciudad Juárez and the women facially disfigured by acid throwing, the female body continues to be a threat in the public sphere. This panel explores scholarly ideas on feminist conceptualizations of the female body in the public realm in Spanish-speaking societies vis-à-vis the above-mentioned context.

Paper Title: 100 words max.

Paper Abstract: 300 words max.

Submit online: https://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html

CFP - The Comparative Literature Students’ Tribune – 3rd meeting 

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:32am
The Comparative Literature Students' Tribune / La Tribune des étudiant-e-s en littérature comparée
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 1, 2016

***The English version follows*** Invitation à participer à :La tribune des étudiant-e-s en littérature comparée – 3ème édition28 octobre 2016Université de Montréal -Comparatistes : Affirmez-vous ! La Tribune des étudiant-e-s en littérature comparée est un espace de rencontre permettant aux étudiant-e-s de deuxième et troisième cycles de partager leurs projets de recherche tout en réfléchissant aux enjeux de leur discipline.

“I do love these ancient ruins”-- Ruinophilia in Early Modern Literature and Culture / RSA 2017

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:32am
Margaret Owens, Nipissing University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, May 28, 2016

 

Ruinophilia, Ruin Porn, Ruin Lust – the roots of post-modernity’s recent enthralment with ruins are often traced back to the eighteenth-century cult of the sublime. However, Antonio’s remark, “I do love these ancient ruins,” in John Webster’s The Duchess of Malfi, suggests that versions of ruinophilia were very much alive in the early seventeenth century. This proposed panel for the Renaissance Society of America conference (30 March-1 April 2017 in Chicago) seeks papers that explore the fascination with ruins in sixteenth and seventeenth-century literary and cultural venues.  

 

The Ancient Novel in the Renaissance RSA 2017 Chicago

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:32am
Claire Sommers/The Graduate Center, CUNY
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

 Though many modern scholars place the invention of the novel in the 18th century, the genre arose much earlier. Early Modern works such as those by Sidney, Rabelais, and Cervantes may be classified as novels. However, the genre has its origins in the ancient Greek and Roman novels of the second and third centuries. While these works are often forgotten in the present day, they were translated during the Renaissance and were among the most widely read texts of the Early Modern period. Their popularity stemmed from their content and their structures, as they synthesized and examined several genres in a single prose work. As a result, echoes of the ancient novel are present in Renaissance romance, satire, poetry, and theatre.

Forms of Imperfection in the English Renaissance (RSA 2017)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:32am
Andrew Carlson, Thomas Fulton / Rutgers University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

While early modern writers sought “the perfect perfection of poesy” (to borrow the words of William Webbe), forms of imperfection have become central to our understanding of the period and its literary accomplishments. Scholars have lately looked to categories such as eccentricity, errancy, and incoherence as they have tried to understand the rise of English vernacular eloquence and the distinction of poetic making over the course of the early modern period.

SAMLA 88: Modern Drama [Deadline Extended]

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:32am
Aaron Botwick / South Atlantic Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

This session invites submissions of paper proposals on plays and/or performances under the broad category of modern drama. Comparative Drama as well as Drama in English papers are welcome.  Papers on SAMLA's conference theme--Utopia/Dystopia: Whose Paradise Is It?--will be given special consideration.

 

By May 31, 2016, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Aaron Botwick, The Graduate Center, CUNY, at abotwick@gradcenter.cuny.edu.

Unreasonable, Speculative, Fantastic: Women’s Parapolitical Creativity During the English Civil Wars (RSA 2017)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:32am
Jantina Ellens, McMaster University; Chantelle Thauvette, Siena College
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 20, 2016

This panel proposes to explore English Civil War writing outside of its traditionally historical and male-focused frames. Research by Diane Purkiss, Mihoko Suzuki, and Susan Wiseman draws attention to gendered ways of understanding history and politics in the literatures of the Civil Wars, but there remain many more “areas of excess and gaps and silences where unreason flourishes” (Purkiss 4) that have yet to be explored.  

Digital Minds: Latin(o) Americans in Cyberspace

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:31am
NeMLA 2017 Annual Convention, Baltimore, March 23-26, 2017 (Johns Hopkins University)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

This session explores the emergent field of digital narratives with a focus on productions originated in Latin America; the panel will also analyze digital works produced by Latin@s in the United States. As the scholarship of élika Ortega, Scott Weintraub, Luis Correa-Díaz, Osvaldo Cleger, Carolina Gaínza, and Phillip Penix-Tadsen thoroughly demonstrate, Latin America is currently having an avant-garde role in the production of digital narratives in cyberspace. Interactive novels and poems, as well as online artistic platforms and the creation of video games count among the wide range of cultural artifacts produced in the region to be shared in cyberspace.

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