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cultural studies and historical approaches

CFP, NEMLA Spaces of Hope and Desperation in Science Fiction

updated: 
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 5:35pm
Elif Sendur/ Binghamton University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

If we reflect on Vivian Sobchak’s premise of science fiction’s role of reconciling humans with the unknown along with cyborg spaces of Haraway, we can easily perceive that today one of speculative/science fiction’s roles is imagining what is happening and what may happen to help us come to terms with a dreaded present and unstable future. Amidst the very real and imminent threats of environmental disasters, rise of nationalism and racism and an expanding precarity, it should not be a surprise to see the fast increase in the sales of Orwell’s 1984, re-makes of Blade Runner and Ghost in the Shell or appearance of SF works where strangers, aliens, and others are rethought and replaced in our topological frameworks.

Jewishness and Postcoloniality in Literature, Culture and Theory

updated: 
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 5:36pm
Journal of Jewish Identities - Special Issue
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 1, 2017

 

 

Jewishness and Postcoloniality in Literature, Culture and Theory

 

CFP – Special Issue of The Journal of Jewish Identities

 

Guest Edited by Sarah Phillips Casteel, Anna Guttman and Isabelle Hesse

 

Writing Romantic Lives

updated: 
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 5:39pm
Edge Hill University and Keele University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 18, 2017

A One Day Postgraduate Symposium, hosted by Romanticism @ Edge Hill University & Keele University

CFP for a one-day postgraduate symposium on 25th November 2017

CfP: edited volume Hipster Culture: A Reader

updated: 
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 5:39pm
Heike Steinhoff and Eric Erbacher
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 30, 2017

Call for Papers

Hipster Culture: A Reader

Eds. Heike Steinhoff and Eric C. Erbacher

The Literary Interface

updated: 
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 5:40pm
The Australian National University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, July 1, 2017

This convention will bring together scholars working across the broad field of literary studies to discuss the literary as an interface between different forms of knowledge and processes of knowledge formation, looking at questions of how and through what means the literary is communicated, represented, negotiated, and remade. By placing the concept of the literary centre-stage while at the same time interrogating its role as an interface, we wish to open up for discussion questions about the role, dynamism, and value of the literary in a time of institutional change and ongoing disciplinary formation.

Studies in the Fantastic Issue 5

updated: 
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 5:41pm
Studies in the Fantastic
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Studies in the Fantastic requests submissions for issue 5 of our peer-reviewed academic journal, to be published in winter 2017/18. Essays examining the fantastic from a variety of scholarly perspectives are welcome. For consideration for issue 5, please send submissions to fantastic@ut.edu by August 1, 2017.

 

Submitted articles should conform to the following guidelines:

1. 6,000-12,000 words

2. MLA-style citations and bibliography

3. A separate title page with author information to facilitate blind peer review

4. 1” margins, 12 point serif font, page numbers (but no identifying information in page headers)

 

Imagining Other Worlds: Setting in Early Modern English Drama

updated: 
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 5:41pm
Northeast MLA
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Every play imagines its own world—but the worlds they imagine must in some way connect with their audience. This panel invites perspectives on early modern English drama that considers the balance between these two poles: the imagined world of the setting and its connection to the surrounding culture in early modern England. This balance is particularly important in early modern English drama for both historical reasons—an increased awareness of other worlds and their different reality within the expanding cultural purview of the early modern English—and literary ones—since so much criticism of these plays has focused on their relation to early modern England itself to the exclusion of their frequently quite disparate settings.

Positionality: Place, Race, and Revolution in Indigenous Women’s Identity

updated: 
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 5:41pm
NeMLA 2018
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Abstract:

This NeMLA panel will focus on the ways women have transformed space and place as central to their creation of a self-determined identity. In particular, it will focus on indigenous women’s relationship to geography and gender in the construction of self. Such an autonomous identity subverts the societal expectations and cultural geographies that have forced definitions of race and gender upon 19th- and 20th-century women. This panel would be an intersection of cultural geography, indigenous and ethnic studies, social justice issues, and eco/feminism.

Description:

Call for Chapters: Representations of Children and Youth in Popular Culture

updated: 
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 5:41pm
Ingrid E. Castro, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, USA & Jessica Clark, University of Suffolk, Ipswich, UK
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 31, 2017

We are currently seeking chapter submissions for an edited volume that interrogates the representations of children and young people’s agency in popular culture.  When considering children and youth, acts of agency are inseparable from the heightened structures they are forced to work within and around.

Mystery, Mayhem, Subversion, and Criminality in Faulkner (SAMLA 89, November 3-5, 2017, Atlanta)

updated: 
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 5:41pm
The William Faulkner Society / South Atlantic Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, June 7, 2017

The William Faulkner Society welcomes papers that explore Faulkner's use of mystery, mayhem, subversion, and criminal elements in his works. By June 7, 2017, please submit an abstract of 250-350 words, A/V requirements, and a brief bio, to Harper Strom, Georgia State University, at hstrom@gsu.edu, and Ulf Kirchdorfer, Albany State University, at Ulf.Kirchdorfer@asurams.edu.

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