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cultural studies and historical approaches

Richard fitz Nigel’s Dialogue of the Exchequer: Literary, Economic, Political, and Spiritual Approaches

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:19pm
Paper Session: 54th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 9-12 May 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

It is hard to exaggerate the novelty of English Treasurer Richard fitz Nigel’s Dialogue of the Exchequer, completedc. 1179. Often considered Europe’s first administrative manual, it required the invention of a new genre, the systematic thinking-through of collected bureaucratic knowledge and its categorization and organization. Successive generations of historians have mined this text for data about England’s taxation office and common law, but it has much more to offer researchers of bureaucratic and institutional culture, medieval identity formation, and intertextuality. 

Approaches to Medieval Bureaucracies: A Roundtable

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:08pm
Special Session, 54th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 9-12 May 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

Close to 100 years ago, T. F. Tout was able to claim in his magisterial six-volume study of England’s letter-writing offices that the administrative history of thirteenth- and fourteenth-century England was "largely unwritten.” Within the last ten or twenty years, however, historians have undertaken socio-cultural studies of medieval bureaucracy and its personnel, moving from prosopographical and biographical sketches to nuanced examinations of the experience and challenges of bureaucratic employment throughout Europe.

NeMLA 2019 Panel: Activism, Advocacy, and the Archive

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:06pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

While historical and literary archives have long been integral to the study of the humanities, they are more than simple repositories for historical artifacts. They don’t just preserve works and fragments to be studied, they help us, as scholars, to actively engage in the public sphere. As Randall C. Jimerson notes “Archivists can use the power of archives to promote accountability, open government, diversity, and social justice.” In doing so, archivists can democratize information and open up new avenues of knowing by employing ethical and objective—but not neutral—strategies. This can be especially important for subjugated communities, who’s histories and cultures have been bound and kept distinct.

The Wakandan Civitas and its Panthering Futurity

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:36pm
Northeastern Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Black Panther ventures Afrotopic advancement and this panel engages receptions of Black civilization as literary form (i.e. reading film, graphic novel, etc. as text) in order to create dialogue generally about various aspects of African and African diasporic representation. This panel reviews and welcomes both ideal and/or dystopic civilizational interpretives.  Papers should endeavor various facets seen on screen as text and how it reveals connectivity from or to a Black past particularly locating eutopic notions that counter or embellish traditionalized (and/or sexualized, racialized, classized) gazes. We encourage submission that read rendering notions of race, class, gender, intelligence, civilizations, colonialisms, etc.

Aesthetics of Gentrification

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:35pm
SLOW LAB (University of Oregon, College of Design)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 8, 2018

Aesthetics of Gentrification: Art, Architecture, and Displacement

 

International Conference

University of Oregon in Portland

April 5-6, 2019

 

Organized by the University of Oregon SLOW LAB, this interdisciplinary conference brings together scholars from across the humanities, social sciences, and art and design fields to explore the aesthetic dimensions of gentrification in the present era of accelerated urbanism.

WITCHCRAFT HYSTERIA. Performing witchcraft in contemporary art and pop culture.

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:36am
Katharina Brandl and Johanna Braun / University of California, Los Angeles and University of Basel
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 1, 2018

We seem to be living in bewitched times. Witches are everywhere in pop culture, and we're also seeing victims of alleged "witch hunts" pop up all over the place, especially on Twitter and other social media. Pop-stars perform as witches: like Katy Perry in her performance at the 2014 Grammy awards, where she appeared in a cowl before a crystal ball, while later dancing with broomsticks as poles. Beyoncé’s visual album “Lemonade” (2016) made several explicit references to the historical figure Marie Laveau and magical witchcraft rituals drawn from Yoruba traditions.

Representations of Class Intersectionality (ACLA 2019)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:37pm
ACLA 2019 // March 7th-10th // Georgetown University
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Representations of Class Intersectionality

ACLA 2019 — March 7th - 10th

Georgetown University, Washington DC

Critical Fashion & Luxury at NeMLA 2019

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:16pm
nigel lezama, brock university
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Jen Sweeney (Bard College), Nigel Lezama (Brock University) & Jess Clark (Brock University) are co-organizing a small series of critical fashion and luxury studies interventions and events at NeMLA in Washington, DC, from March 21 to 24, 2019. We are seeking 200-word proposals from speakers for the following panel and round table:

Power Dressing: Counter-Hegemonic Practices in Fashion And Luxury

Capitalizing on Fashion and Luxury Studies and Practices: A Roundtable Discussion

For more info, click here: https://networks.h-net.org/node/73374/announcements/2097159/fashion-inte...

NeMLA 2019 Panel: The Future of Trauma Studies

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 8:25am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This pre-approved panel seeks scholars to present at the 2019 NeMLA conference (March 21-24 in Washington, DC) on the topic of trauma studies.

Panel Description:

Within literary trauma theory, no critic is more ubiquitous than Cathy Caruth whose seminal works—Unclaimed Experience (1996) and Trauma: Explorations in Memory (1995)—remain hegemonic more than two decades since their publication. Drawing on the work of psychiatrists Judith Herman and Bessel van der Kolk, Caruth imagines trauma as an “impossible history” and claims that to listen to trauma is to listen to narrative “departure.” Trauma figures into Caruth’s work as silence—a force strong enough to cause language to fail.

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