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cultural studies and historical approaches

Call for Papers [Volume: 07, Issue: 03]

updated: 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - 3:46pm
International Journal of English Language & Translation Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 31, 2019

We are currently soliciting unpublished, quality research articles/case studies in the fields of ELT, Linguistics, Literature, Discourse and Translation Studies for Volume: 07, Issue: 03 [July-September, 2019 Issue] of IJ-ELTS.  

The papers can address issues in/related to the following research disciplines-

Trauma, Narratives, Institutions: Transdisciplinary Dialogues

updated: 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - 3:47pm
Johns Hopkins University, Center for Medical Humanities and Social Medicine
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 22, 2019

It is a pleasure to invite submissions for our conference, titled Trauma, Narratives, Institutions: transdisciplinary dialogues, organized by the Center for Medical Humanities and Social Medicine on November 15-16, 2019.

[NeMLA 2020 Panel] "Imagining the Past: Neo-Medievalism in Fantasy Genre"

updated: 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - 1:44pm
Jiwon Ohm/ Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In “Dreaming of the Middle Ages,” Umberto Eco asks the question: “What would Ruskin, Morris, and the pre-Raphaelites have said if they had been told that the rediscovery of the Middle Ages would be the work of the twentieth-century mass media?”

Indeed, the twentieth-century mass media has disseminated what Eco calls, “escapism à la Tolkien” which has influenced many modern writers and cultural producers in other mass media such as films and video games. Although such “escapism à la Tolkien,” or “Tolkienesque” fantasy, seems harmless as pure entertainment, its consumption is massive, and many picture the Middle Ages not as it actually was, but how it is depicted through medievalist fantasy.

Women Writing Fashion

updated: 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - 1:41pm
NeMLA/ hosted by Dr. Jen Sweeney and Jaclyn Marcus
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This panel is focused on the employment of fashion by female-identifying authors to discuss issues of inequity, specifically surrounding the themes of gender, sexuality, race, and class in their writing. In this panel, the relationship between text and the sartorial and the capitalization on this relationship by female-identifying authors will be explored. Given the focus of this panel on centering voices across cultures, we especially welcome papers discussing global texts, authors writing in all languages, and analyzing works written from non-Western perspectives.

International Virginia Woolf Society Panel at University of Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture Since 1900

updated: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 2:49pm
International Virginia Woolf Society
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 26, 2019

The International Virginia Woolf Society is pleased to host its twentieth consecutive panel at the University of Louisville’s Conference on Literature and Culture Since 1900, scheduled for February 20-22, 2020.  We invite proposals for critical papers on any topic concerning Woolf’s work. A specific panel theme may be decided upon depending on the proposals received.   Previous IVWS panels have met with great enthusiasm at Louisville, and we look forward to another successful session.

Dependent Stages: Knowing in Shakespeare (NeMLA 2020)

updated: 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - 12:18pm
John F. Maune / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

A playwright has to build their story within their allotted two hours of stage traffic. We are taken on a guided ride from which we glimpse what the playwright chooses, forming our layers of knowledge through which we are manipulated. Often we are privy to the internal thoughts of a character which contrast with their public utterances: e.g., Rosalind/Ganymede, Angelo, or Richard III. Our prescient view makes Macduff's seemingly banal inquiry about his wife and children emotive fire. Our own knowing is challenged just by taking in a play as we know it is not real, yet we embrace the illusion.

After the Welfare State: Reconceiving Mutual Aid

updated: 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - 12:14pm
The Telos-Paul Piccone Institute
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

The 2020 Annual Telos-Paul Piccone Institute Conference
February 15–16, 2020
Deutsches Haus at New York University
New York, NY

After the Welfare State: Reconceiving Mutual Aid

Keynote Speaker: Catherine Malabou, Kingston University and University of California, Irvine.

 

Conference Description

Feeling (Un)American: Race and National Belonging in the African American Literary Tradition

updated: 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - 12:14pm
North East Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In his 1903 The Souls of Black Folk, W.E.B. Du Bois poses a question at the heart of the African-American literary tradition: “How does it feel to be a problem?” We see the question’s precursors in Walker’s Appeal, Douglass’ address on the Fourth of July, and Harper’s anti-slavery poetry. It reverberates in Hurston’s “How It Feels To Be Colored Me,” Ellison’s “black and blue,” Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, and Rankine’s Citizen. Taking up the affective relationship between race and national belonging, these texts ask us to contend with what it feels like to be black in a nation founded on anti-blackness. Indeed, as Baldwin and Coates make clear, the problem lies ever “between the world and me.”

 

Teaching South Asia outside the English Department

updated: 
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 1:36pm
South Asian Literary Association (SALA) Conference, Seattle, WA 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 31, 2019

How does pedagogical strategizing work in teaching Global South Asian literatures in majority serving institutions located in areas where the student body is mostly white, or lacking in South Asian immigrant groups? How does South Asian literature find a place in general education core courses? What are some current practices and challenges that scholars of color specializing in and including South Asia as a text, experience in their classrooms? We are interested in sharing experiences on teaching, planning courses, writing curriculum development projects including South Asia centric courses both for the major and the general education classes that embrace the inclusion of literatures from the global South, especially from South Asia.

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