Subscribe to RSS - cultural studies and historical approaches

cultural studies and historical approaches

Russian & American Short Stories and Influence Abstract: 11/15/2018; Completed Draft: 3/15/2019

updated: 
Wednesday, October 10, 2018 - 3:37pm
Jeff Birkenstein & Robert Hauhart
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 15, 2018

Though usually relegated to second status critically, the short story is having a moment. When Canadian writer Alice Munro won the Nobel Prize for literature in 2013, it was specifically for her contribution to the short story genre. As a writer who does not write novels, she acknowledged the importance of the award: “It’s a wonderful thing for the short story.” Indeed.

 

NETSOL-CFP-Fall 2018-Interdisciplinary Journal

updated: 
Wednesday, October 10, 2018 - 3:36pm
Netsol: New Trends in Social and Liberal Sciences
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

Faculty-owned and faculty-run, open-access interdisciplinary journal, NETSOL (ISSN 2469-4002), is still accepting submissions for Fall 2018 issue.

 

CFP: The Rule(s) of Exception(s) in Early Modern Culture (16th-17thc.): Literary and Historical Perspectives on Exception and Exceptionality

updated: 
Monday, October 15, 2018 - 12:31pm
ociété Française Shakespeare et de la Société d'Études Anglo-Américaines des XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 2, 2018

 

 CFP Early Modern Studies Seminar, "The Rule(s) of Exception(s) in Early Modern Culture (16th-17thc.): Literary and Historical Perspectives on Exception and Exceptionality", SAES Congress, 6-8 June 2019, Aix-en-Provence, France.

 

Faking it. Forgery and Fabrication in Late Medieval and Early Modern Culture

updated: 
Thursday, September 27, 2018 - 9:19am
The Early Modern Seminar, The University of Gothenburg
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, January 30, 2019

What is real and what is fake? And why does it matter? As soon as objects, texts and utterances (be they pragmatic or artistic) become imbued with a sense of authority or authenticity, there is a potential to produce other objects, texts and utterances which mimic and attempt to siphon off that authority and authenticity. In late medieval and early modern European culture (1400-1750), this potential was realized in new and unprecedented ways. Social, technological, and intellectual developments forever altered many activities which fall under the remit of forgery and fabrication, spurring lively debate about truth and falsity. The printing press transformed the production, distribution and marketing of texts and images.

16th Annual Tolkien at UVM Conference

updated: 
Thursday, September 27, 2018 - 9:18am
Tolkien at the University of Vermont
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, January 15, 2019

16th Annual Tolkien at the UVM Conference: Tolkien and Horror

Saturday, April 6th 2019

Our theme this year is Tolkien and Horror. Consider submitting an abstract on this theme or on any subject. We encourage single papers or an organized session.

We are pleased to announce that our Keynote Speaker this coming year will be Professor Yvette Kisor (Ramapo College). Please consider submitting abstracts today to Christopher Vaccaro (cvaccaro@uvm.edu)! The deadline is January 15, 2019.

 

CEA 2019: New Orleans / Special Topic: Old Dogs, New Tricks

updated: 
Thursday, September 27, 2018 - 9:24am
College English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

CEA 2019: New Orleans

Call for Papers
Closing date: November 1, 2018

Special Topic: Old Dogs, New Tricks

50th Annual Conference | March 28-30, 2019 | New Orleans
  
Vision/Revision

“If we had a keen vision of all that is ordinary in human life, it would be like hearing the grass grow or the squirrel’s heart beat, and we should die of that roar which is the other side of silence.” —George Eliot

“And time yet for a hundred indecisions/And for a hundred visions and revisions/Before the taking of a toast and tea.” —T. S. Eliot

Call for Papers: Hispanic, Latino/a, and Chicano/a Literature at CEA 2019 (CEA 3/28-30/19)

updated: 
Thursday, September 27, 2018 - 9:17am
College English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

Subject: Call for Papers: Hispanic, Latino/a, and Chicano/a Literature at CEA 2019

 

Call for Papers: Hispanic, Latino/a, and Chicano/a Literature at CEA 2019

March 28-30, 2019 | New Orleans, Louisiana

Astor Crowne Plaza

739 Canal Street, New Orleans, Louisiana 70130 | Phone: (504) 962-0500

The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations on [special topic title] for our 50th annual conference. Submit your proposal at www.cea-web.org

Re/Inventions Conference: Memory - Graduate Student Conference, CSU- Long Beach

updated: 
Thursday, September 27, 2018 - 9:29am
English Graduate Student Association (California State University of Long Beach)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 12, 2018

ABSTRACTS DUE: OCTOBER 12, 2018

 

CONFERENCE DATE: NOVEMBER 29, 2018

 

Re/Inventions is the annual conference organized by the English Graduate Student Association
(EGSA) of California State University, Long Beach.
Our goal is to provide a forum in which graduate students and advanced undergraduates
may present their academic research in a conference setting.
Re/Inventions promotes interdisciplinary collaboration and engagement
among students from Southern California and around the globe.

 

Presentist, Historical, and Unveiled Identities from Beowulf to the Eighteenth Century

updated: 
Thursday, September 27, 2018 - 9:24am
Mark Kaethler / Medicine Hat College
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 15, 2018

This survey panel aims to establish dialogues between experts in early literatures. The confluence of epochs facilitates cross-historical discussion and provides a means for thinking about ways to teach early survey courses in university or college classrooms. This panel focuses on identities (racial, gendered, sexual, or mediatized, etc.). In recent years, scholars have labelled efforts to locate early forms of contemporary identity in early literature as presentist, an approach that tends to overlook differences between historical eras by prioritizing current concerns. However, are presentist methods actually flawed? And does any effort to trace earlier forms of current interests automatically constitute presentism?

Pages