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ecocriticism and environmental studies

NeMLA 2018: Politics of Preservation: Land, Law and Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 9:25pm
Hande Gurses, UMass Amherst
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 29, 2017

Earlier this year a river revered by the local Mauri people in New Zealand has been granted legal rights as a living entity. This first incident was then succeeded by a court’s decision in India to grant the rivers Ganges and Yamuna the status of living beings. Not all parts of the earth benefit from such legal protection as evidenced by the Gezi Park protests in Istanbul in 2013 and by the Dakota Pipeline protests more recently.

[Update] Levinas, the Material, and Ethics (deadline extended)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 7, 2017 - 11:14am
North American Levinas Society
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Levinas, the Material, and Ethics

 North American Levinas Society

12th Annual International Conference

Loyola University Chicago

Chicago, IL, USA

July 24-27, 2017 

Plenary Speakers:

Adriaan Peperzak, Loyola University Chicago

Tom Sparrow, Slippery Rock University

Annual Talmudic Lecture: Georges Hansel, SIREL

 

Creative Writing: Literary Nonfiction and Memoir for PAMLA 2017 Conference Honolulu, Hawaii (11/10-12/2017)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 9:30pm
J. Mark Smith (MacEwan University)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 26, 2017

The presiding officer invites submissions of short works of literary nonfiction, memoir, or other sorts of creative nonfiction (such as the lyric essay) that can be presented in a twenty minute segment of the panel. Both established and emerging writers are welcome.

Please submit proposals via the online system by June 26, 2017. The PAMLA 2017 Conference will be held at the lovely Chaminade University of Honolulu (with the official conference hotel being the Ala Moana) from Friday, November 10 to Sunday, November 12. This year’s conference theme is “The Sense of Sight: Visuality, Visibility, and Ways of Seeing.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Climate and Income Inequality

updated: 
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 9:30pm
C19 conference in Albuquerque in March 2018
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 31, 2017

For the C19 conference in Albuquerque in March 2018, I am seeking scholars to form a panel called "Climate and Income Inequality" -- a panel that addresses the literary representation of the conjunction of climate change and socioeconomic inequality. While environmental justice and environmental racism focus on low-income or minority communities who are forced to live near hazardous or toxic environments, I would like the panel to focus on how climate change specifically affects the poor. How do authors express concerns about vulnerability, deprivation, limited resources, exploitation, oppression, development, distributive justice, mitigation, and education so that the terms equally apply to financial struggles and anthropogenic climate change?

Cli-fi and Class

updated: 
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 9:30pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 1, 2017

Anthropogenic climate change is not an "equal opportunity" threat--the poor will suffer much more than the wealthy. Many American writers recognize this and address socioeconomic struggle alongside global warming. Since both wealth inequality and planetary warming are socially constructed forces of economics and politics, how do American writers narrate one in terms of the other in order to reveal and connect the dual exploitation of the poor and the earth? Upload 500-word proposals by September 1, 2017 to panel number 16744 "Clif-fi and Class" to https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/Login   questions to drosenthal@jcu.edu

Gendered Ecologies and Nineteenth-Century Women Writers

updated: 
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 9:16pm
Northeast MLA Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

If ecology is without nature, as Timothy Morton provocatively argued in 2007, then one may wonder of ecology without the feminine as a corollary. For nature, much like the feminine, has been fetishized, exoticized, and romanticized as a signifier emptied out—a sort of lacuna. If we can be at ease with the gap, vacancy, or interval and, perhaps, theorize about the unfilled space while sorting out the inconsistencies of what it means to represent nature, the feminine, and androgyny, then we might begin to trace the valuable contributions of 19th-century women writers to the development of the term oecologia coined by Ernst Haeckel in 1866 and beyond. 

"The US and the World We Inhabit". 24th AISNA Biennial Conference University of Milan, September 28-30, 2017

updated: 
Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 4:18pm
Italian Association for North American Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 15, 2017

24th AISNA Biennial Conference

The US and the World We Inhabit
University of Milan, September 28-30, 2017

Paper proposals (max. 300 words) should be submitted, together with a brief biographical note, to the Workshop Coordinators and carbon copied to the Conference Organizer, Paola Loreto (paola.loreto@unimi.it), by June 15, 2017. Successful proponents will be notified by June 30, 2017. Workshops exceeding four participants will be split into two sessions.

 

 

1. The Wor(l)ds We Inhabit: Modes and Moods of Reading

Bard of Pittsburgh: A Roundtable on Gerald Stern (NeMLA 18)

updated: 
Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 4:45pm
Darla Himeles, Temple University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Born in Pittsburgh in 1925, Gerald Stern is one of America’s most prominent, vibrant, and idiosyncratic contemporary poets. He is the author of eighteen collections of poetry (most recently Galaxy Love, W.W. Norton, 2017) and four collections of essays (most recently Death Watch, Trinity UP, 2017) and the recipient of numerous awards, including the Wallace Stevens Award and the 2014 Frost Medal. He has established himself as a distinctive voice that is accessible and sophisticated, gregarious and visionary. This roundtable will provide a lively critical examination of Stern’s work from a variety of perspectives and then invite discussion. 

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