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ecocriticism and environmental studies

Call for Articles on Radicalism

updated: 
Wednesday, August 28, 2019 - 2:13pm
Journal for the Study of Radicalism
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

JSR: Journal for the Study of Radicalism—an academic journal published by Michigan State University Press—announces a call for articles and reviews for our fifteenth year of issues.

For our coming issues, we are particularly interested in articles that address anarchism, Black Bloc activism, Antifa, and ecological radicalism.  

Approaches to Hybridity in the Epic Genre

updated: 
Thursday, September 12, 2019 - 1:47pm
Société Rencesvals, American-Canadian Branch
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

Approaches to Hybridity in the Epic Genre

55th International Congress on Medieval Studies

            Epic genre could be seen as what Mary Louis Pratt calls a "contact zone", a space in which diverse cultures "meet, clash and grapple with each other, often in contexts of highly asymmetrical relations of power". It is a space where encounters give rise to new categories of gender, class, rule, and language. The concept of hybridity allows for the exploration of these spaces and voices that do not fit neatly into prescribed definitions.

Brandeis Novel Symposium 2020: Willa Cather, Settler colonialism, indigeneity

updated: 
Friday, August 30, 2019 - 8:11am
John Plotz/ Brandeis Novel Symposium
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

CFP: Brandeis Novel Symposium

Friday April 24, 2020

Brandeis University, Waltham, MA

 

Deadline for submissions: November 1, 2019 

The fourth annual Brandeis Novel Symposium examines the genre’s relation to issues of settler colonialism, land, and indigeneity. The focal text is Willa Cather’s The Professor’s House (1925). As in previous years, we invite papers that explore these larger questions from diverse theoretical, historical and formal angles, taking Cather’s novel either as focus or simply as a point of departure.

Fictions of the Neoliberal City (ACLA 2020, Chicago)

updated: 
Monday, August 26, 2019 - 10:08am
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

ACLA 2020 Annual Meeting, March 19-22, Chicago

 

Fictions of the Neoliberal City

 

Climate Change and Comparative Aesthetics

updated: 
Monday, August 26, 2019 - 10:10am
Rebecca Oh, University of Illinois
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

In 2016 Amitav Ghosh threw down a gauntlet: realism, he asserted, is not adequate to the task of representing climate change. As per the subtitle of The Great Derangement, it is “the unthinkable” both in our recent Holocene past and in the genre of realism. Shortly after, Jesse Oak Taylor called out Ghosh’s dismissal of realism on b2o’s blog while advocating other kinds of serious fiction, like modernism and magical realism, as capable of representing climate change. Most recently, Elizabeth DeLoughrey has asserted that allegory is the form par excellence for representing the Anthropocene.

Race/Science/Fiction

updated: 
Tuesday, August 20, 2019 - 9:19am
Society for the Study of Southern Literature 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Race/Science/Fiction

 

Thomas Merton (CEA 3/26-3/28/20)

updated: 
Monday, August 19, 2019 - 12:33pm
nazareth college
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

International Thomas Merton Society

at the

College English Association

51stTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE 

Hilton Head Marriott Resort & Spa

March 26-29,2020

Call for Papers

Climate Fictions / Indigenous Studies

updated: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019 - 10:50am
University of Cambridge
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 25, 2019

Critical Indigenous studies can neither be perceived as niche, nor trivialized as topical. In the way climate-capitalism has become an existential threat, a sincere engagement with Indigenous knowledges has become ineluctable. This conference seeks to initiate a multidisciplinary conversation on climate change, as conceived by, and re-inscribed within, Indigenous literatures. So far within the small domain of English Humanities, contemporary climate fiction by Indigenous authors have presented an urgent need to converse with scientific and social-scientific approaches to climate change.

Literary Imagination of the Plasticene

updated: 
Friday, August 16, 2019 - 11:06am
MLA 2020 Convention Just-in-Time Session
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 3, 2019

According to the US Geological Survey’s findings published in May 2019, “it is raining plastic” in the Rocky Mountains. Reports of airborne microplastics travelling around the globe are being released. The Arctic snow is shown to contain plastic particles. These disturbing discoveries attest that the pervasiveness of plastic has never been more conspicuous, even in the most “pristine” regions of the planet. At the same time, with India's impending ban on importing plastics from abroad for recycling purposes, plastic acts a political metaphor of neoimperialism that backfires on the “first-world” countries. In this era of Plasticene, we breathe, eat, drink, and excrete plastic.

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