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ecocriticism and environmental studies

“Breath: Image and Sound,” a special issue

updated: 
Saturday, July 29, 2017 - 3:20pm
New Review of Film and Television Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

New Review of Film and Television Studies seeks contributions for a special issue on “Breath: Image and Sound.” Contributors are encouraged to consider, among other topics, the interplay between breath and particular media; phenomenologies or phenomenalities of breath and air; and breathing in different affective modes and genres. Possible research questions include, but are not limited to:

Reimagining Ecologies of Time/Place in Postcolonial Fiction (NeMLA 2018)

updated: 
Monday, July 10, 2017 - 12:47pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Postcolonialism and ecocriticism have often been at odds with one another for the main reason that postcoloniality typically concerns itself with issues of displacement and diaspora, while ecocritical practice attends to a very specific ethics of place. However, as critics such as David Mazel argue, there exists an ability to interpret the land through the lens of a “poststructuralist ecocriticism” that encompasses “a way of reading environmental literature and canonical landscapes that attends concurrently to the discursive construction of both…environment and subjectivity,” creating an “analysis of the environment as a powerful site for naturalizing constructs of race, class, nationality, and gender” (American Literary Environmentalism, xxi).

Modernisms and the Anthropocene-Deadline Extended

updated: 
Monday, July 31, 2017 - 5:24pm
Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900, February 22-24, 2018, at the University of Louisville
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900, February 22-24, 2018, at the University of Louisville 

This critical panel or roundtable invites proposals from scholars working at the intersection of modernist and Anthropocene studies. Presentations might engage with the following quandaries and/or themes, as well as unlimited others:  

Land and Language in Layamon’s Brut

updated: 
Monday, July 10, 2017 - 3:13pm
International Layamon's Brut Society/Kalamazoo 2018
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

The International Layamon's Brut Society is accepting proposals for the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies, May 10-13, 2018, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI.  

Land and Language in Layamon’s Brut

Call for Essays: Writing as a Way of Staying Human in a Time that Isn't

updated: 
Monday, July 10, 2017 - 12:38pm
Nate Mickelson, Assembly for Expanded Perspectives on Learning
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS for an EDITED COLLECTION WRITING AS A WAY OF STAYING HUMAN IN A TIME THAT ISN’T Deadline for submission of manuscripts: September 15, 2017 This edited collection will continue conversations started at the Assembly for Expanded Perspectives on Learning’s 2017 Annual Conference, Writing as a Way of Being, by providing concrete, specific strategies to readers for incorporating the human element in their teaching, writing, research, or/and everyday lives.  The human element of our work has never been more important. As conference keynote Robert Yagelski explains, ideological and social pressures have put our institutions under increasing pressure.

Life Plus 2 Meters: How will we (not) adapt to life in a climate-changed world

updated: 
Friday, July 7, 2017 - 9:20am
David Zetland/Leiden University College
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

We’ve just finished a successful Kickstarter that raised $660 from backers.  That money will fund prizes for authors who submit the best “visions” (short essays of 800-1,000 words) of how we might (not) adapt to life in a climate-changed world.

Visions are “fictional” because they take place in the future, but they are based on the storyteller’s imagination or practitioner’s knowledge.

Anyone can submit a story or perspective no matter the author’s background, qualifications or job.

There will be four categories of prizes:

The Animal in Medieval Romance, at the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies 2018

updated: 
Friday, July 7, 2017 - 9:19am
The Medieval Romance Society
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

The 'animal turn' is one of the newest and most exciting developments in medieval scholarship. Researchers are increasingly interrogating the role of animals in society and culture, the interaction between human and beast, and the formation of human and non-human identities.

The Medieval Romance Society is hosting two inter-related sessions on the role of animals in romances at the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies 2018, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo. We welcome papers which draw on a broad range of methodologies and address a variety of themes relating to animals.

Session I: The Animal in Medieval Romance I: The Animal as Friend

(Un)Ethical Futures: Utopia, Dystopia and Science Fiction

updated: 
Friday, July 7, 2017 - 9:19am
Monash University & University of Warwick
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 13, 2017

(UN)ETHICAL FUTURES: UTOPIA, DYSTOPIA AND SCIENCE FICTION

16 & 17 December 2017 

With pre-conference activities for postgraduate students on 15 December 2017

 

Hosted by Monash University in Melbourne, Australia

Organised by Monash University and the University of Warwick with funding provided by the Monash Warwick Alliance

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

Deadline: 13 August 2017

 

Deadline Approaching: The New Urban Gothic Edited Collection Call for Chapters

updated: 
Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 3:26am
Holly-Gale Millette, Southampton University, Ruth Heholt, Falmouth University
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Urban Gothic is a subgenre of Gothic fiction, Gothic crime fiction, and television whose narratives spring from discourse on industrial and post-industrial urban society. Often dystopic, it was pioneered in the mid-19th century in Britain and the United States and developed in serialisations such as R. L. Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886); into novels such as Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890). Much has been written on 19th century Anglo-centred Urban Gothic fiction and vampiristic, monstrous Urban Gothic, but less has been written on the 21st century reimagining and re-serialisation of the Urban Gothic in mechanised, altered, disabled, and dystopic states of being.

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