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ecocriticism and environmental studies

Shakespeare and the Environment (NEMLA, Montreal, April 7-10, 2010; abstracts due September 30, 2009)

updated: 
Monday, June 8, 2009 - 3:16pm
Miles Taylor / Le Moyne College

In what ways does Shakespeare imagine the natural world in his plays and poems, and how do those depictions set the stage on which his characters act? In a tragedy like King Lear, Shakespeare envisions a nature that can strip away the layers and accretions of culture that have blinded the protagonist. Is that the same nature as the "green world" of his comedies? Or is the Forest of Ardenne not just a different space but a different kind of nature than the heath? How might we read the island environment of The Tempest, and Prospero's control over the elements? Do Shakespeare's histories posit a sense of the land itself, and if so, do they conceive of a workable way to live in harmony with nature?

Press/Reject!

updated: 
Sunday, June 7, 2009 - 9:01am
Richard Burt and Craig Saper

Call for Essays for "Press (R)eject" special issue of Rhizomes.net
issue 20 (Winter 2009/2010) http://www.rhizomes.net/

Co-edited Richard Burt and Craig Saper, co-operators of the
Rejectionist Movement

Cfp Transcultural memory - a conference (abstracts by July 21, 2009; conference held on Feb 05-06, 2010)

updated: 
Friday, June 5, 2009 - 6:41am
Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies and Goldsmiths, University of London

Transcultural Memory
A conference jointly organized by the Department of English and Comparative Literature, Goldsmiths, University of London, and The Centre for the Study of Cultural Memory, Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies, University of London
This conference marks the inauguration of The Centre for the Study of Cultural Memory.
Date: 5-6th February, 2010.
Conference organizers: Lucy Bond, Rick Crownshaw and Jessica Rapson (Goldsmiths); Katia Pizzi and Ricarda Vidal (Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies).
Venue: Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies, University of London
Keynote speakers:
Astrid Erll (University of Wuppertal)
Andrew Hoskins (University of Warwick)

Pedagogy, Presentism, and Early Modern Ecocriticsm

updated: 
Thursday, June 4, 2009 - 4:24pm
Lynne Bruckner

Looking for submissions for a collection of essays on teaching early Modern literature, and Shakespeare in particular, from an ecocritical perspective.

The volume encourages essays that show how teaching early modern texts ecocritically can be a matter of engaging in political struggle on behalf of the environment. Presentist approaches and essays that look at Shakespeare in different historical moments (including contemporary performances/films) are particularly welcome. Those who are ecocritics who happen to teach Shakespeare or other early modern texts, in addition to those who would describe themselves as Shakespeare or early modern scholars, are equally welcome to submit.

Contemporary Women's Writing: New Texts, Approaches, and Technologies (7-9 July 2010; deadline 15 August 2009)

updated: 
Thursday, June 4, 2009 - 3:54pm
Contemporary Women's Writing Network and San Diego State University

The Third Biennial International Conference of the
Contemporary Women's Writing Network

In Collaboration with San Diego State University

7-9 July 2010

Abstract Deadline: 15 August 2009

Organizers:

Edith Frampton, Dept. of English and Comparative Literature

Anne Donadey, Departments of European Studies and Women's Studies

Due 9/1/09 OUr Monsters, Ourselves NEMLA 2010 Montreal, Quebec

updated: 
Thursday, June 4, 2009 - 11:48am
Lizzie Harris McCormick / NEMLA

"Our Monsters, Ourselves"

This panel seeks papers on the historical significance and meaning of the monsters everywhere in our cultural moment. Following the line of thought that a society's supernatural monsters in many ways define them, "Our Monsters, Ourselves" hopes to open the discussion of the ways monsters in recent fiction and film represent the tacit panics, problems and pleasures of English-language, North American culture in 2010. Monsters are defined, for this panel, as those creatures presented as explicitly and literally "supernatural" or "artificial" by their authors.

A short list of dramatis personae might include vampires, ware-wolves, robots, ghosts, AI figures, witches and demons.

Postcolonial studies and transnationalism Special Issue for 2009

updated: 
Wednesday, June 3, 2009 - 2:03am
Manusya Journal, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok

Submission is invited for papers is invited that examine issues on postcolonial and transnational studies from a variety of perspectives and disciplines. Possible topics may include colonial discourse, gender, ethnicity, nation, migration, ecocriticism, tourism, popular culture and others. Papers address theoretical dialogues between postcolonial studies and transnational studies or focus on geocultural areas are also welcomed.
Accepted papers will be published in a special issue of Manusya, a leading English-language journal based in Bangkok and sponsored by Thailand Research Fund. Papers should be between 5,000-6,000 words in length with an abstract.
Deadline for submission: September, 2009

[UPDATE]

updated: 
Tuesday, June 2, 2009 - 2:54pm
Joel Davis, Sidney Society

The Sidney Society will sponsor three open sessions on Philip Sidney and his Circle at the 45th International Congress on Medieval Studies Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, Michigan). The conference website is here: http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/

May 13-16, 2010

Abstracts are invited on any subject dealing with Philip Sidney and his circle. As ever, we encourage proposals from newcomers as well as established scholars.

Papers should be limited to twenty minutes in reading time. Please do not submit an abstract to two different sessions of the conference in the same year.

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