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ecocriticism and environmental studies

Writing the World: Representation of the Cultural, Political and Natural World in Medieval and Renaissance Europe - 13-14/11/09

updated: 
Tuesday, August 25, 2009 - 2:20am
Medieval Studies, University of British Columbia

CFP: 38th Annual Medieval Studies Workshop, University of British Columbia [repost]

Vancouver, Canada, 13-14 November 2009

Writing the World: Representation of the

Cultural, Political and Natural World in Medieval and Renaissance Europe

http://ubc2009medieval.blogspot.com/

'What can we know of the world? What quantity of space can our eyes hope to take in between our birth and our death? How many square centimetres of Planet Earth will the soles of our feet have touched?' (Georges Perec, Species of Spaces, p. 78).

[UPDATE] CFP American Studies Area 12/15/09 SW/TX PCA/ACA February 10-13, 2010

updated: 
Monday, August 24, 2009 - 5:16pm
Lisa Stein/SW/TX PCA ACA

Thanks to all who submitted during the first round call! We still have room for presentations in the American Studies area, final deadline December 15th, 2009.

Call for Papers: American Studies Area
Southwest/Texas Popular Culture & American Culture Associations 31st Annual Conference

February 10-13, 2010
Hyatt Regency, Albuquerque, NM
Submission Deadline: 12/15/09, Priority Registration Deadline 11/1/09
Conference Hotel:
Hyatt Regency Albuquerque
330 Tijeras
Albuquerque, NM 87102
505.842.1234

Further conference details are available at http://www.swtxpca.org

11th Global Conference: Perspectives on Evil and Human Wickedness (March 2010: Salzburg, Austria)

updated: 
Monday, August 24, 2009 - 5:27am
Dr Rob Fisher/Inter-Disciplinary.Net

11th Global Conference
Perspectives on Evil and Human Wickedness

Monday 15th March - Thursday 18th March 2010
Salzburg, Austria

Call for Papers
This inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary conference seeks to examine and explore issues surrounding evil and human wickedness. Papers, presentations, reports and workshops are invited on issues on or broadly related to any of the following themes:

Empire and Intercultural Encounter in Eighteenth-Century British America, (ASECS, 3/18-21 2010)

updated: 
Sunday, August 23, 2009 - 1:29pm
Kelly Wisecup/University of North Texas

During the eighteenth-century, British Americans celebrated commodities from tobacco to sugar cane in georgic poems, displayed their cosmopolitan sensibility in narratives of inter-colonial travel, and defended colonial culture against metropolitan accusations of degeneration in natural histories. While these literatures facilitated transatlantic exchanges with Europeans in the metropolis, they also included accounts of intercultural encounters among colonists, Native Americans, and Africans. Recent scholarship has examined how colonists' transatlantic literary and commercial exchanges allowed them contribute to various metropolitan literary and philosophical discourses, from the literatures of empire to natural historical philosophies.

[UPDATE Deadline Extended: Sept. 15, 2009] The Politics of Nature and Wilderness in the Middle Ages (Kalamazoo 2010)

updated: 
Sunday, August 23, 2009 - 11:33am
Oregon Medieval English Literature Society (OMELS)

Jennifer Neville's "Representations of the Natural World in Old English Poetry" and Gillian Rudd's "Greenery: Ecocritical Readings of Late Medieval English Literature" are examples of the growing interest in ecocritical readings of medieval literature. The ways medieval writers thought about and interacted with nature and wilderness are important and relevant in regard to other conceptual frames and formulations that governed medieval thought and behavior. Papers in this panel will address the representations of nature in medieval texts as they pertained to and promoted political ideologies and programs of instruction or colonization. Papers on English and Continental literature are welcome.

CFP: 18th- and 19th-C. British Women Writers Conference (Abstracts due Oct. 15, 2009)

updated: 
Friday, August 21, 2009 - 6:38pm
18th- and 19th-C. British Women Writers Association /Texas A&M University

The 18th Annual 18th- and 19th-Century British Women Writers Conference
Texas A&M University
College Station, TX

"Journeys"
April 8-11, 2010

Keynote Speakers: Kate Flint and Felicity A. Nussbaum
Plenary Panel Speakers: Mary E. Fissell, Jillian Heydt-Stevenson, and Erika Rappaport

Call for Papers

This year's conference will explore the abundant varieties of journeys found in 18th- and 19th-century British women's writing. We encourage interdisciplinary considerations of topics such as migration, travel, exile, exploration, tourism, border crossing, religion, travel writing, art, fantasy, children's literature and more.

Philosophy as Critical Theory: The Dialectic of Enlightenment Revisited

updated: 
Friday, August 21, 2009 - 5:25pm
Daniel White

In The Dialectic of Enlightenment (Dialektik der Aufklärung, 1944) Max Horkheimer and Theodor Adorno invoked the voyage of Odysseus—especially his encounter with the Sirens—as a sustained metaphor for the emergence of the "subject" of knowledge, judgment, and discourse out of the mythic substratum of Homeric poetry. The authors understood Odysseus to be an emblem of the modern bourgeois individual, comparable to the Socratic "self" derided by Friedrich Nietzsche and designated by Max Weber as the calculating ratiocinator who gave us "progress" in its various forms: capitalist, socialist, technocratic, and utilitarian. The Critical Theory of the Frankfurt School which the authors founded was designed to provide a groundbreaking position.

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