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ecocriticism and environmental studies

Urban Places: The Literary Ecology of American Cities (Abstracts by 9/30)

updated: 
Monday, September 28, 2009 - 2:39pm
Karen E. Waldron / Northeast Modern Language Association Conf. April 7-11, 2010

This proposed panel follows on a very successful seminar discussion conducted at NeMLA 2009 entitled: "The Literary Ecology of American Literature: Constructions of Place." It proposes to continue wrestling with the significant questions of methodology in studying literature of and about the environment through a particular focus on the literature of cities. This work is critical to studies of literature and environment, an area which has not been theorized adequately. The need to draw effectively on other disciplinary knowledges and how they manifest in linguistic form is central to this effort and the ultimate goal of the project is an edited collection of essays on the literary construction of place within the American context.

[UPDATE] The Politics of the Western

updated: 
Sunday, September 27, 2009 - 10:39am
Darren Millar, John Abbott College

Call for Papers

The Politics of the Western (Expanded Topic)

41st Anniversary Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
April 7-11, 2010
Montreal, Quebec - Hilton Bonaventure

Call for Proposals: Death and Representation, a One-Day Conference

updated: 
Saturday, September 26, 2009 - 1:19am
Department of English, University of Rochester

Death and Representation
Keynote Speaker: Dana Luciano, Georgetown University
Author of "Arranging Grief: Sacred Time and the Body in Nineteenth-Century America," winner of the 2008 MLA Prize for a First Book
Conference Date: March 26, 2010
Please submit abstracts (maximum 500 words) by November 15 via email to:
Jason Middleton, jmiddle2@mail.rochester.edu
Genevieve Guenther, vive@mail.rochester.edu

RE: Nebula Latest Issue & Call For Papers

updated: 
Friday, September 25, 2009 - 10:24pm
Nebula: A Journal of Multidisciplinary Scholarship

Nebula 6.3 is now online with unrestricted access at http://www.nobleworld.biz . The editors now invite submissions for Nebula 6.4 (December, 2009) with a manuscript deadine of November 5, 2009. The current CFP is reproduced below the contents page for the current issue, provided here for your convenience.

NEBULA 6.3

Catherine Akca and Ali Gunes. "Male Myth-Making: The Origins of Feminism." 1-15

Steve Redhead. "Hooligan Writing and the Study of Football Fan Culture: Problems and Possibilities." 16-41

Kane X. Faucher. "Sphacelated Grammars (or: Language Likes to Hide)." 42-52

[CFP] Battleground States Conference 2010: War(s) and Peace - February 26 - 27, 2010

updated: 
Friday, September 25, 2009 - 8:10pm
The Culture Club: Cultural Studies Scholars Association at Bowling Green State University

Battleground States 2010: War(s) and Peace will be held February 26th and 27th, 2010 on the Bowling Green State University campus. The Culture Club: Cultural Studies Scholars' Association hopes to elicit presenters who consider the conference theme from multiple perspectives and media. As our aim is to create a conference dedicated to interdisciplinarity, we invite proposals from graduate students, emerging and independent scholars, junior faculty, artists, activists, filmmakers, and educators.

Going Green from the Black Perspective: The Significance of Environmental Issues in the Black Community, 2/25/2010, NY [update]

updated: 
Thursday, September 24, 2009 - 9:37pm
Dr. T Walters. Stony Brook University

"Going Green from the Black Perspective: The Significance of Environmental Issues in the Black Community" is a one-day conference devoted to exploring the various ways Black activists, scholars, agriculturalists, and politicians have been (and are) currently responding to environmental issues within communities of color. At this time we are accepting papers that examine a variety of issues linked to environmentalism such as 1. the impact of toxic dump sites in urban communities, 2. the black community's involvement with green initiatives from the grassroots level to the international stage, 3. the relationship between environmentalism and activism within the black community, or 4. educating children of color about the vulnerability of the planet.

Going Green from the Black Perspective: The Significance of Environmental Issues in the Black Community, February 25, 2010

updated: 
Thursday, September 24, 2009 - 9:32pm
Dr. T Walters. Stony Brook University

"Going Green from the Black Perspective: The Significance of Environmental Issues in the Black Community" is a one-day conference devoted to exploring the various ways Black activists, scholars, agriculturalists, and politicians have been (and are) currently responding to environmental issues within communities of color. At this time we are accepting papers that examine a variety of issues linked to environmentalism such as 1. the impact of toxic dump sites in urban communities, 2. the black community's involvement with green initiatives from the grassroots level to the international stage, 3. the relationship between environmentalism and activism within the black community, or 4. educating children of color about the vulnerability of the planet.

Interdisciplinary Studies in Social Sciences

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2009 - 4:20pm
Michigan Academy of Science, Arts & Letters

Call for Papers, Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, 2010
Section: Interdisciplinary Studies in Social Sciences

Accepting panel & paper proposals on any topic in the social sciences. Special interest in interdisciplinary studies and in studies that discuss/employ humanities and/or natural sciences with social sciences.

Conference: March 26, 2010 at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan

Abstracts are due by November 30, 2009. Abstracts should be submitted on line at the Michigan Academy website: www.alma.edu/michiganacademy

Faulkner and the Metropolis- Electronic submissions by July 1, 2010

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2009 - 1:51pm
The Faulkner Journal

Faulkner and the Metropolis

It has long been axiomatic that modernism is both "about" and a product of the city. And in myriad examples, modernist culture reveals both its investments in representing urban experience and its formal shaping by metropolitan rhythms, material conditions, and energy. No less than his description of himself as a simple "country farmer," Faulkner's largely rural settings would seem to distinguish him from a modernism that is deeply engaged with urban experience. Yet Faulkner's work was in fact powerfully affected by his encounter with the city—both as a historical, social reality and as an imaginative construction or space.

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