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eighteenth century

Gothic Terror, Gothic Horror: 15th International Gothic Association Conference

updated: 
Tuesday, November 20, 2018 - 1:51pm
Dr. Jamil Mustafa / Lewis University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, January 31, 2019

Lewis University, Romeoville, Illinois, July 30 - August 2, 2019

With a focus at once sharp and wide, Gothic Terror, Gothic Horror will stimulate an eclectic and inclusive conversation about the essence of the Gothic.

We invite the submission of abstracts that explore the conference theme. We welcome proposed panels of three related papers. Since this IGA conference is the first to be held in the United States, we encourage proposals that consider the theme in relation to the American Gothic.

City Scenes, Urban Spaces, and the Civic Mind

updated: 
Monday, November 19, 2018 - 8:56am
South Central Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 14, 2018

The 44th Annual Meeting of the South Central Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies theme is "The Eighteenth Century in Perspective." The meeting will take place February 21-23, 2019, in Dallas, Texas. The full conference announcement is available at http://www.scsecs.net/scsecs/2019/2019cfp.html.

EXTENDED DEADLINE: “Perspectives on Eighteenth-Century Theater and Performance" (SCSECS 2019)

updated: 
Monday, November 19, 2018 - 8:38am
Ashley Bender / South Central Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 14, 2018

This panel seeks proposals on theater and performance of the long eighteenth-century, especially those that address the theme of perspective. Essays might consider the way that perspective functioned thematically in plays and other public performances, such as opera, dance, and music, and the ways that perspective (e.g., perspective scenery) affected the material conditions of performance. What perspectives did eighteenth-century audiences have on theater and performance? How did these perspectives in the public discourse shape the drama and performances of the period, and how was eighteenth-century society shaped by these cultural institutions?

ECF: The Indigenous Eighteenth Century

updated: 
Tuesday, November 20, 2018 - 2:10pm
Eighteenth-Century Fiction, McMaster University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 15, 2019

Eighteenth-Century Fiction: Call for submissions

The Indigenous Eighteenth Century

EXTENDED DEADLINE: SCSECS 2019

updated: 
Monday, November 19, 2018 - 9:00am
South Central Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 14, 2018

The paper submission deadline for SCSECS 2019 has been extended to Friday, December 14. A full list of panels can be found at scsecs.net. Please submit abstracts directly to the panel chair. If you don't see a panel that fits your paper idea, you can submit a proposal to conference co-organizer Ashley Bender at abender@twu.edu

Jane Austen Upside Down

updated: 
Monday, November 19, 2018 - 8:31am
Lisa Hopkins
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, February 1, 2019

JANE AUSTEN UPSIDE DOWN

A special issue of Persuasions On-Line

Scientiae: Early Modern Knowledge (12-15 June, Queen's University, Belfast)

updated: 
Wednesday, November 14, 2018 - 9:22am
Scientiae: Disciplines of Knowing in the Early Modern World
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 30, 2018

SCIENTIAE: Early Modern Knowledge

June 12th 15th, 2019

Queen’s University, Belfast.

 

With plenary addresses by:

Ingrid Rowland (Notre Dame/Rome) & Rob Iliffe (Oxford)

 

and plenary panels led by:

 Subha Mukherji (Cambridge) &

Hidden Gems from Fleet Street: New Perspectives on Non-Canonical and Popular Eighteenth-Century Literature

updated: 
Monday, November 12, 2018 - 4:17pm
South Central Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 29, 2018

Beginning with the pamphlet wars during the Restoration and ending with authors serving as critics to one anothers’ writings in the Romantic period, the eighteenth century was rife was debates about how to define and identify good literature. Authors such as John Dryden, Alexander Pope, Thomas Gray, William Wordsworth, and many others served as adjudicators of good literature by chastising others’ work in their prefaces, poetry, pamphlets, and mock epics. Theater history and book history however, tells us that some of the works of these dunces were widely popular and important in their own right—regardless of how derided they were by their peers.

The Brontes and their Contemporaries: Texts and Contexts (1816-1855)

updated: 
Monday, November 12, 2018 - 4:31pm
Jadavpur University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 18, 2018

This year (2018) the Bronte Society, centres of Victorian Studies as well as Literature departments across the Anglophone world are commemorating the bicentenary of Emily Bronte's birth with several conferences and events. The three Bronte sisters, Charlotte, Emily and Anne, were born in Yorkshire between 1816 and 1820. They all died young, with the longest survivor, Charlotte, passing away in 1855, possibly from tuberculosis (like her sisters) or typhus. However, in their short literary life, the sisters published one volume of poetry and seven novels – many of them as the Bells – which have ensured their presence and influence in the English literary sphere to this day.

Decadence [Call for Papers/Reviews]

updated: 
Monday, November 12, 2018 - 4:22pm
University College London [Dept of English: Moveable Type, Vol. 11 (Summer 2019)]
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, February 1, 2019

Montesquieu's assertion that the fall of the Roman Empire could be attributed to a decline in morality and deviation from Classical ideals redefined the term “décadence.” From a neutral term for “decline,” decadence transformed into a laden pejorative signifying perversity and decay, as well as a warning against the dangers of excess and the pursuit of pleasure. Perceived as a disruptive force, dangerous to social order and bourgeois normativity, the threat of decadence is still invoked in modern political rhetoric to stoke anxieties over shifts in traditional values and social mores, as well as the looming threat of an irretrievable loss of geopolitical power.

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