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eighteenth century

CFP: Colonialism and Knowledge (4/15/06; NEASECS, 11/9/06-11/12/06)

updated: 
Wednesday, March 15, 2006 - 1:29pm
Pratima Prasad

NEASECS (Northeastern American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies) 2006; Nov. 9-12, 2006; Salem, Massachusetts.
CFP deadline: Apr. 15, 2006

Panel title: "Colonialism and Knowledge-Making in Eighteenth-Century Europe"

Eighteenth-century colonial expansion gave birth to, enabled, and systematized several European bodies of knowledge: encounters with non-European populations gave rise to large-scale classifications of race in European scientific discourse; a vast and growing body of travel writing produced ethnographies and encyclopedic treatises on peoples and cultures of the globe; scientific exploration abroad aided the development of European natural science.

UPDATE: Restoration and Eighteenth Century British Literature Regular Session, Open Topic (3/15/06; SCMLA, 10/26/06-10/28/06)

updated: 
Friday, March 10, 2006 - 1:24pm
Caroline E. Kimberly

UPDATE: Restoration and Eighteenth Century British Literature Regular Session,
Open Topic, to be held at the South Central MLA 2006, Fort Worth, TX.

Please submit a one-page abstract by March 15th, 2006 to Caroline Kimberly,
Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Literature, Language, and Culture,
Atlanta, GA 30332-0165, caroline.kimberly_at_lcc.gatech.edu. Email submissions
preferred.

UPDATE: Irish Studies (Spain) (3/1/06; 5/25/06-5/27/06)

updated: 
Thursday, March 2, 2006 - 4:45pm
VI AEDEI Conference

VI International Conference of The Spanish Association for Irish Studies
(AEDEI)
University of Valladolid (Spain)
25-27 May 2006

[Updated information: extended deadline (1 March 2006 ) and web page]

CFP: Old Books, New Media: Using Technology to Teach Pre-1900 Texts (4/15/06; MMLA, 11/9/06-11/12/06)

updated: 
Friday, February 24, 2006 - 4:27pm
Elizabeth Coker

Old Books, New Media: Using Technology to teach Pre-1900 Texts
 
With the advent of computer classrooms, web-based archives, digital storytelling, and a host of other technological marvels, technology in the literature classroom has moved beyond the occasional Zeffirelli or Merchant Ivory film to encompass a wide range of problems and possibilities for teachers and students alike.

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