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ethnicity and national identity

Appropriation and Its Discontents (ACLA 2018)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 20, 2017 - 1:20pm
ACLA at UCLA, 3/29/18-4/01/18
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 21, 2017

A couple of years ago, when the conceptual poet Kenneth Goldsmith read “The Body of Michael Brown,” an appropriation of Brown’s autopsy report for a conference at Brown University, he unleashed a furious debate about the politics of speaking for another people’s pain or experience.  While some accused him of bad taste and pointed to the long, colonial history of white male artists using black bodies as fodder for their art, others defended the right of the artist to provoke and explore, and decried what they considered the essentialism behind condemnations of Goldsmith’s pieces.  Appropriation’s discontents are also evident in such recent controversies as the protests against the exhibit of Dana Schutz's "Open Casket" at the Whitney Biennial (and the subs

Culture at Our Borders

updated: 
Wednesday, September 20, 2017 - 1:20pm
ACLA Annual Meeting (UCLA, LA, April 29-March 1, 2018)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 21, 2017

It has become increasingly difficult today to characterize cultural belonging. This is not to suggest that cultures have disappeared but that it has become impossible to think of them as homogeneous, providing us with totalizing expressions of collective identity. The globalizing movement of modernity, the deterritorializing flows of its economic relations and the migration that follows it show that the borders between cultures have dissolved while the concept of culture itself is more than ever characterized by internal tensions. It is then neither cultural identity nor its constitutive outside that is central to culture but rather the movement in which it already resides.

Call For Papers for Third Issue of the Journal of Studies in History & Culture

updated: 
Thursday, September 14, 2017 - 12:31pm
Journal of Studies in History & Culture (JSHC)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 30, 2017

Events to commemorate the centenary of the First World War have been organized since 2014 and would continue through 2018. It has already sparked of various retellings on the war in fiction and celluloid. The third issue of JSHC attempts to offer renewed perspectives on the First World War. While war and society is the general theme for this issue, all the content in our issues have never been restricted to the pre-decided theme alone. Therefore, we welcome contributors for wide ranging perspectives and discussions on general issues beyond the present theme.

EXTENDED: Racial Passing and Colorism in Literature Panel

updated: 
Thursday, September 14, 2017 - 12:01pm
Society for the Study of Southern Literature
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 19, 2017

CFP: Racial Passing and Colorism in Literature Panel

Society for the Study of Southern Literature
Biennial Conference
Austin, Texas
15-18 February 2018

 

Racial passing has been a common theme in literature, especially in texts dealing with escaping to freedom during the antebellum period.  The Nadir period also witnessed a spike in racial passing and colorism themes as racial tensions heightened anti-black violence throughout the United States. This panel seeks papers that examine texts dealing with racial passing and colorism.  Questions for consideration might include:

Excluded: Neglected Authors Pre-1900, American Literature and Literary History

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:30pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Call for Papers

The Northeast Modern Language Association Conference

April 12-15, 2018 Pittsburgh

Submissions are due September 30th.

Submit your proposal online at NeMLA. www.buffalo.edu/nemla

Excluded: Neglected Authors Pre-1900, American Literature and Literary History (Panel)


Primary Area / Secondary Area

American.  ID 16775

Chair(s)

Melissa Mentzer (Central Connecticut State University)

 

Abstract

Teaching Terrorism: CFP for 2018 NEMLA Roundtable, Pittsburgh April 12-15.

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:29pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Call for papers for a roundtable at the 2018 Northeast Modern Language Association conference in Pittsburgh, April 12-15. 
Deadline for Submission: September 30, 2017.

This roundtable will examine teaching methods and strategies for addressing the fiction of terrorism in the contemporary literature classroom. With a focus on teaching after 9/11, and in a moment fraught with tensions about politics and secondary education (see, for example, the “Professor Watchlist”), this roundtable will also address the ways faculty can frame their classes—not only for the students they teach, but for a general public concerned with the politics of college and university faculty.

Elsewhere: Wandering In and Out of the Humanities

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:28pm
New Voices Graduate Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, October 1, 2017

J. R. R. Tolkien once wrote, “Not all those who wander are lost.” Although this quotation has experienced its fair share of "inspirational quote" status by both Tolkien and Coachella fans alike, there remains a question of what "wandering" and "being elsewhere" means for the academic community. The 2018 New Voices Graduate Conference invites submissions that consider concepts of elsewhere. How do the terms interdisciplinary, difference, and othering delineate the elsewhere of cultural studies? What do authors and texts stand to gain wandering outside canonical forms? We also invite papers that explore the elsewheres of canonical texts, as well as papers that illuminate uncanonized and/or forgotten works.

Franz Fanon Today

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:23pm
Richard Schumaker/ Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Soldier, psychoanalyst, political activist, and post-colonial theorist—in his intense and brief life, Frantz Fanon wore many masks. And his influence has been as variegated as well; the list of those who fell under his sway include, to name just a few, Sartre and De Beauvoir, Homi Bahba, film director Gillo Pontecorvo, and the Black Panthers. This panel invites papers that explore and meditate upon how Fanon’s vibrant life and enduring writings influenced and continue to operate upon our present cultural and political moment.

This panel focuses on the enduring influence of Frantz Fanon by looking at specific works, ideas, and connections between Fanon and events, especially those of national liberation between his lifetime and the present time.

ACLA Seminar: Figuring the Sacred in a (Post-)Secular World

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:20pm
ACLA Conference 2018, University of California, Los Angeles, CA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 21, 2017

In his 1938 essay, “Figura,” Erich Auerbach asserts that a figura, unlike an eidosconveying static form, is inherently invested in a relation to time. As Auerbach's use of the figure was polemically mobilized in order to undermine the manufactured barbarism of fascist philology in his time, so might the figure in yet other chronotopes direct readership to structures of barbarism, power, or erotic desire, for example, and their material and philosophical lineages in the world.

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