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ethnicity and national identity

Representations of Class Intersectionality (ACLA 2019)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:37pm
ACLA 2019 // March 7th-10th // Georgetown University
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Representations of Class Intersectionality

ACLA 2019 — March 7th - 10th

Georgetown University, Washington DC

Critical Fashion & Luxury at NeMLA 2019

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:16pm
nigel lezama, brock university
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Jen Sweeney (Bard College), Nigel Lezama (Brock University) & Jess Clark (Brock University) are co-organizing a small series of critical fashion and luxury studies interventions and events at NeMLA in Washington, DC, from March 21 to 24, 2019. We are seeking 200-word proposals from speakers for the following panel and round table:

Power Dressing: Counter-Hegemonic Practices in Fashion And Luxury

Capitalizing on Fashion and Luxury Studies and Practices: A Roundtable Discussion

For more info, click here: https://networks.h-net.org/node/73374/announcements/2097159/fashion-inte...

Moving through Memory and Space

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:31pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This panel seeks to explore representations of transnational space and transcultural memory in literature of French expression. Whether through exile, immigration, travel, migritudeerrance, or the meanderings of the flâneur/flâneuse, francophones have traversed a wide global terrain. Just as authors integrate place into their creations, they in turn leave their stamp on the memories and associations that accrue to any geographical location. Cultural production then reflects and inflects shifting identitarian configurations.

Race and Versification in Anglophone Poetry

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:51pm
NeMLA (March 21-24, 2019; Washington D.C.)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Race and Versification in Anglophone Poetry

Studies of versification tend to be silent on race, and with some exceptions (such as Anthony Reed’s 2014 Freedom Time), studies of race and poetic form tend to turn away from the mechanics of versification. As Dorothy Wang argues in Thinking its Presence: Race and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry (2014), most accounts of poetic form revolve around the technical accomplishments of white poets, while minority figures are seen as more valuable for their poetry’s social or thematic content. What would happen if nonwhite poets were read for their proficiency with poetic forms, and were made the center of conversations about poetic technique? 

LCIR: Narratives of Displacement International Conference: "Navigating Borders: Immigration, Refugeeism and Citizenship"

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:48pm
London Centre for Interdisciplenary Research
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 20, 2018

The conference seeks to explore the narratives of displacement and to demonstrate the validity of a cross-disciplinary approach which brings together the historical, cultural, social and literary expertise in the handling of text. The conference will particularly focus on time and space representations and on treatment of the theme of cultural ambivalence and identity conflict. The subject of displacement will be regarded as both a migration, voluntary or forced, and a sense of being socially or culturally “out of place”.

Papers are invited on topics related, but not limited, to:

NEMLA 2019: Conceptions of History and the Future in American Literature after 9/11

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:27pm
Liliana M. Naydan, Penn State Abington
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

When the 9/11 attacks occurred in New York City; Shanksville, Pennsylvania; and Washington, DC, many Americans had the sense that, to quote Don DeLillo, 9/11 had transformed “the world narrative, unquestionably” (Interview with David Ulin). In destroying the Twin Towers in New York City, they devastated icons of the American Century and they marked the start of what DeLillo has called the Age of Terror and hence the start of an unsettling and unfamiliar future. Yet in many ways, too, the 9/11 attacks, marked a return to historical ways of thinking and being.

NeMLA Panel on James Baldwin's Global Legacy

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:24pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

NeMLA; Washington DC; March 21-24, 2019

 

Disillusioned by the racial issues in America, James Baldwin moved to France in 1948. Nine years later, however, he was drawn back after seeing a photograph of Dorothy Counts, a young black girl in Charlotte, North Carolina being harassed by a white mob as she entered an all-white high school. They threw rocks, spat on her, and told her to go back to where she came from. The image and situation were significant for Baldwin for various reasons. First, despite his attempts to avoid American racism, it had found him in Paris. Second, it was as if the taunts of "go back to where you came from" to Dorothy Counts drew Baldwin back "home" to document and confront American racism head on.

Gender, Identity, and Belonging in Minority Women Artistic Production

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:32pm
Riham Ismail; Tulin Ece Tosun / Purdue University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 20, 2018

Within the current political discourse and political turmoil, representation of women’s races, identities, cultures, precisely of minority women, continue to be under discussion.  Women critics and writers have discussed and examined how current political discourse have changed the understanding of identity in connection with ethnicity, race, color, and language. Identity is formed and shaped by culture, beliefs, race, ethnicity, and space among several other factors.Stuart Hall argues “Identity is never complete, always in process, and always constituted within, not outside, representation.” With this in mind, howcomplex then this process of construction becomes when color, race, or religion emerges as defining factor of whether or not one belongs?

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