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ethnicity and national identity

(Kalamazoo 2019) Exchanging Cultures: Anglo-French Relations in the Middle Ages

updated: 
Friday, August 3, 2018 - 9:23am
Steven F. Kruger, Medieval Studies Certificate Program, Graduate Center, CUNY
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

Scholars agree that English and French, whether language, literature, or culture, had a strong relationship in the Middle Ages. Despite their mutual interactions and back-and-forth distribution of power, the portrayal of the relationship has remained fairly static, frequently described as French influence on English writing but not the other way around. Rather than a unidirectional influence, however, we should perhaps consider the relationship to be one of exchange. How might English ideas have influenced French ones? How might both peoples have viewed each other on a day-to-day level?

Very Special Episodes Anthology

updated: 
Friday, August 3, 2018 - 9:29am
Jonathan Cohn, University of Alberta
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, December 10, 2018

Very Special Episodes: Event Television and Social Change Anthology

Edited by Jonathan Cohn and Phil Scepanski 

 

Abstracts/Proposals (300 words) due December 10th.

Chapters (no longer than 6000 words) due April 1st

Please submit queries and proposals to:  cohn@ualberta.caand scepanski.phil@gmail.com

 

Speculative Fiction, Pedagogy, and Social Change (NeMLA 2019)

updated: 
Friday, August 3, 2018 - 8:56am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

In their 2011 text, Teaching Science Fiction, Andy Sawyer and Peter Wright posit that science fiction is "one of the most effective genres for challenging the perspectives of a student body" (1). Yet Teaching Science Fiction is one of the few recent compendiums on teaching speculative fiction; the last significant scholarly focus on speculative fiction and pedagogy was in the 1970s and 1980s. The majority of publications after 2000 on teaching science fiction consider the teaching of science through science fiction.

International Symposium On Notions of Romani Origin

updated: 
Wednesday, August 1, 2018 - 9:58am
Centre for Advanced Study, Sofia
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, October 31, 2018

The claim in support of the Romani community’s Indian origin -- what the Orientalists first propounded is now reinforced by Genetics -- was, during the 18-19th centuries, premised upon the homophony between Romani and Indian languages. This was in line with notions of ‘border thinking’ so pervasive within the Orientalist discourse, and has since then provoked classist vis-à-vis confrontations and ideological practices of territorializing ‘differential space’ (Lefebvre, 1992). Taking off from here, the Centre for Advanced Study, Sofia is organizing an international symposium during 25-26 January 2019, which seeks to reflect on:

Fifteenth Annual Southeast Indian Studies Conference

updated: 
Friday, July 27, 2018 - 9:20am
American Indian Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 11, 2019

The purpose of the Southeast Indian Studies Conference is to provide a forum for discussion of the culture, history, art, health and contemporary issues of Native Americans in the Southeast. The conference serves as a critical venue for scholars, students and all persons interested in American Indian Studies in the region.

Sounding the alarm: ecological crimes and transnational crises

updated: 
Friday, July 27, 2018 - 9:16am
Thierry Gustave, University of Massachussetts, Boston
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Call for Panel Papers : NeMLA Conference 2019

 

Sounding the alarm: ecological crimes and transnational crises

 

Faced with ecological disaster and the migratory crisis, what roles can literature, cinema and popular culture play in raising awareness and empowering human beings? This session welcomes contributions in the fields of contemporary francophone literature and cinema that address the problem of violence against wildlife and explore solutions to this violence in a transnational context.

 

Animating Blackness - NEMLA 2019

updated: 
Thursday, July 26, 2018 - 9:18am
NEMLA 2019 - March 21-24, 2019, Washington, D. C.
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Since 2005, when Sianne Ngai first developed the concept of “animatedness” to describe the ways that racialized bodies are made machine-like through external manipulation, Ngai’s work has continued to provide a useful foundation for investigating representations of black voices and black bodies in African American literature and culture. This session seeks papers that will contribute to this broader scholarly conversation by considering the ways in which black bodies have continued to be voiced, mediated, automatized, and silenced by external forces.

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