Subscribe to RSS - ethnicity and national identity

ethnicity and national identity

Edited Collection: “Marine Feet and Vesuvian Eyes”: The Volcanic Aesthetics of Maria Orsini Natale

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 1:50pm
Wake Forest University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 31, 2020

“The secret for harvesting from existence the greatest fruitfulness and the greatest enjoyment is: to live dangerously! Build your cities on the slopes of Vesuvius!” ~ Nietzsche

 “I have marine feet and Vesuvian eyes, and this belonging to a universe that is land, sea, and lava, my allegiance to a world, not only is a poetic inclination but, in its instinct, a resonant and overwhelming force” ~ Maria Orsini Natale

 


 

 

The Carmen Maria Machado Moment and the Latinx Literary Present

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 1:48pm
Northeast MLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Carmen Maria Machado's short story collection, Her Body and Other Parties (2017), was the winner of the National Book Critics Circle's John Leonard Prize and Shirley Jackson Award, and the finalist for the National Book Award and PEN/Robert W. Brigham Prize for Debut Fiction. Received to great acclaim, Her Body and Other Parties provocatively navigates between eerie and moving narratives that toy between science fiction, speculative fiction, horror, and fan fiction to underscore the various violences inflicted on women's bodies.

Russia and Occultism (Extended Deadline)

updated: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019 - 7:16pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (Mar 5-8 2020 Boston)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 7, 2019

How does representation of the occult differ across time, such as in pre- and post-Soviet works? How are ghosts, alternative science, paganism, and the supernatural associated with themes and concepts in new Russian texts or new approaches to older works? Potential topics include but are not limited to the intersection of occultism with fantasy, science fiction, visual arts, politics, espionage, or satire.

Submit short bios and 300-word abstracts with a free NeMLA CFP List account at https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/18275.

Canadian Association of American Studies at Congress 2020

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 12:08pm
Canadian Association for American Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 15, 2019

 

 

CALL FOR PAPERS: CAAS at Congress 2020

Western University, May 30-June 1, 2020

 

 

The Canadian Association for American Studies invites paper proposals for our 2020 conference, which will be held in conjunction with the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences at Western University in London, Ontario, Canada. Applicants may submit a proposal to one of our CAAS-sponsored panels or roundtables (listed below), or to our General CFP.

 

Deadline for Paper Proposals: November 15, 2019

General CFP

Feeling (Un)American: Race and National Belonging in the African American Literary Tradition

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:55am
North East Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In his 1903 The Souls of Black Folk, W.E.B. Du Bois poses a question at the heart of the African-American literary tradition: “How does it feel to be a problem?” We see the question’s precursors in Walker’s Appeal, Douglass’ address on the Fourth of July, and Harper’s anti-slavery poetry. It reverberates in Hurston’s “How It Feels To Be Colored Me,” Ellison’s “black and blue,” Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, and Rankine’s Citizen. Taking up the affective relationship between race and national belonging, these texts ask us to contend with what it feels like to be black in a nation founded on anti-blackness. Indeed, as Baldwin and Coates make clear, the problem lies ever “between the world and me.”

 

"Philip Roth's Succes de Scandale" at ACLA (March 19-22, 2020)

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:54am
The Philip Roth Society
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

The Philip Roth Society invites submissions for a seminar entitled “Philip Roth’s Succès de Scandale.” While the subject of “literature and scandal” seems to be an emerging trend within studies of European literature, relatively few academic works focus on American literature and scandal. Thus, this panel seeks to examine how Philip Roth, both the subject of scandal and one of its keenest interrogators, can shed new light on this conversation. 

Bringing Mythology Back: A Call for the Literary Study of Mythic Narratives

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:45am
2020 NeMLA (Northeast Modern Language Association)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Mythological narratives constitute a significant portion of the world’s most influential literature; nevertheless, they are glaringly absent from contemporary literary studies. Students interested in the study of mythology are directed to departments of anthropology, religion, or intellectual heritage, and these fields certainly conduct invaluable examinations of world-mythology; however, myths are unequivocally literary in nature, and their omission in departments of literature is both a detriment to the field and a disservice to world cultures. What went wrong with the study of myth-as-literature, and how can we revive this genre to reinvigorate the field of literary studies? 

What went wrong?

Examination Without Misrepresentation: Analyzing Culturally Diverse Narratives

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:45am
2020 NeMLA (Northeast Modern Language Association)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

How can academics attempt to faithfully translate, interpret, analyze, and/or discuss the creative narratives of cultures and communities to which they have no personal connection? This roundtable will insist that this question, although immensely complex, is not rhetorical—and that we, as students and scholars of literature, language, and culture, are positioned to conduct particularly constructive explorations into possible answers.

NeMLA Panel: 'The New Lost Generation': African American Expatriate Writers in Paris, 1945-60

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:45am
Courtney Mullis, Duquesne University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

NeMLA 2020: Boston, MA

http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html

In his 1961 essay “The New Lost Generation,” James Baldwin argues that Europe gave the “new” African American expats of the late 1940s and the 1950s “the sanction, if one can accept it, to become oneself. No artist can survive without this acceptance. But rare indeed is the American artist who achieved this without first becoming a wanderer, and then, upon his return to his own country, the loneliest and most blackly distrusted of men.” Indeed, Baldwin asserts that African American expats in Paris gained a kind of liberation through their experience with a culture wholly unlike their own.

Pages