Subscribe to RSS - ethnicity and national identity

ethnicity and national identity

[NeMLA 2020 Panel] "Imagining the Past: Neo-Medievalism in Fantasy Genre"

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:44am
Jiwon Ohm/ Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In “Dreaming of the Middle Ages,” Umberto Eco asks the question: “What would Ruskin, Morris, and the pre-Raphaelites have said if they had been told that the rediscovery of the Middle Ages would be the work of the twentieth-century mass media?”

Indeed, the twentieth-century mass media has disseminated what Eco calls, “escapism à la Tolkien” which has influenced many modern writers and cultural producers in other mass media such as films and video games. Although such “escapism à la Tolkien,” or “Tolkienesque” fantasy, seems harmless as pure entertainment, its consumption is massive, and many picture the Middle Ages not as it actually was, but how it is depicted through medievalist fantasy.

From the Margins to the Center: Reevaluating “Tradition” in English Studies

updated: 
Friday, September 20, 2019 - 4:34pm
University of Texas San Antonio Graduate English Organization
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 20, 2019

From the Margins to the Center: Reevaluating “Tradition” in English Studies

Graduate Student Symposium ft. keynote by Ariana Brown

February 22, 2020

University of Texas at San Antonio

 

“Enslaved Black folk couldn’t lift shackled feet,

so instead they shuffled

& invented the cumbia—

& you can’t tell me there aren’t many ways to survive,

to remember the dead,

to make a freedom where there isn’t one.”

Excerpt from Ariana Brown, “Cumbia,” published in the Acentos Review, 2019

Decolonizing Growth and Development in Postcolonial Writing (NeMLA 2020 Panel)

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:27am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Echoing the enlightenment ideals and yet widely considered groundbreaking, the United Nations Declaration on the Right to Development in 1986 proclaimed that “the right to development is an inalienable human right by virtue of which every human person and all peoples are entitled to participate in, contribute to, and enjoy economic, social, cultural and political development, in which all human rights and fundamental freedoms can be fully realized.” As Joseph Slaughter denounces as tautological, this declaration presumed that human rights and freedoms could not be made possible without proper development.

COMMUNICATING ACROSS DIFFERENCES: An Anthology of Intercultural Communicative

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:27am
Cynthia Wang / Cal State LA
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 20, 2019

Deadline extended to September 20th.

 

In recent years, our society has become increasingly divisive socially, culturally, politically, and geographically. Just in the US alone, we have seen a rise in conflicts based on differing as well as emerging identities, political views, cultural origins, nationalities, and socio-economic backgrounds.

 

Social Mobility in the French Urban Peripheries

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:26am
NeMLA Annual Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Media depictions of the French cité often present these peripheral areas as spaces in which multiethnic, multiracial youth are hopelessly confined; crime, drugs, violence, and poverty are depicted as inescapable conditions of their daily lives. Youth are portrayed as unable to penetrate beyond the boundaries of their neighborhoods and assimilate into the rest of middle-class, majority white France. Yet, concurrently, these residents of the cité are also characterized by their mobility and itinerancy, in opposition to the “Français de souche” who are firmly anchored in the terroir. Transnational markers of class and racial difference suggest that the ability to move around and resettle is an inescapable trait.

Immigrants of the 21st Century in Spanish and Latin American Film (Panel within NeMLA)

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:22am
NeMLA - NorthEast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Given the current political climate, immigration is a hot topic. It is indeed a complex issue with multiple ramifications, from its economic impact, to border security, or ethical duty. Regardless of our personal stand, few will doubt that contemporary immigration patters are challenging obsolete conceptions of nation and identity. The voices of the newcomers want to have a say in "Shaping and Sharing Identities: Spaces, Places, Languages, and Cultures", the theme of the 2020 NeMLA Convention.

Poetry & Poetics (Critical) Panels for SWPACA

updated: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019 - 5:54pm
Southwest Popular/American Culture Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 31, 2019

Poetry & Poetics (Critical)

Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA)

40th Annual Conference, February 19-22, 2020

Hyatt Regency Hotel & Conference Center

Albuquerque, New Mexico

http://www.southwestpca.org

Proposal submission deadline: October 31, 2019

ACLA 2020 Seminar: Geopolitical Narrative and the Genre Turn

updated: 
Friday, September 20, 2019 - 4:12pm
Elijah Guerra and Cynthia Snider (U of Missouri--Columbia)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

The genre turn in global literature has inspired scholarship exploring the relationship between generic form and contemporary themes. In addition to Caren Irr’s Toward the Geopolitical Novel (2014), which investigates the newly emerging genre of the international political novel, and Theodore Martin’s Contemporary Drift (2017), a comprehensive analysis of contemporary genre fiction and filmwe have also seen scholarship tracking specific genre forms: Contemporary Literature’s 2006 special issue, Immigrant Fictions; Jeremy Rosen’s 2018 article “Literary Fictions and the Genres of Genre Fiction” in Post45; and Sheri-Marie Harrison’s 2019 series Global Horror in Post45, to name a few.

NeMLA 2020 - CFP: Identity and Cityscape in French Crime and Science Fiction Cultural Production

updated: 
Wednesday, September 11, 2019 - 10:01am
Zvezdana Ostojic and Julia Jacob / Johns Hopkins University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This panel explores different urban spaces depicted in popular French and Francophone cultural production, such as crime and science fiction artworks. What are the connotations of urban spaces and how are they represented in these narratives? What does it mean for crime to be located in a particular space? What do construals of futuristic cityscapes say about our understanding of present-day cities? How do these descriptions compare to earlier representations of urban spaces, such as those that appear in realist novels, historical fiction, theater or poetry?

ACLA 2020 Call for Papers: Censorship and Dissent in South Asia

updated: 
Monday, September 9, 2019 - 3:06pm
Preeti Singh/Ohio State University-Columbus
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

The history of censorship in modern South Asia goes back to the Registration of Books Act (1867), used to track anti-state sedition; and to the various indigenous and British non-governmental associations of civilians who organized themselves as the guardians of literary culture around the same time. Both these currents continue to the contemporary moment in many ways. Genres of dissent are governed by various acts, laws, associations, extra-judicial modes of repression, and more recently, by social media.

Pages